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  #1  
Old 05-29-2014, 10:12 PM
DSpivack DSpivack is offline
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Default Baseball Books

There are a lot of good ones out there, and lots of new ones as well.

http://grantland.com/features/baseba...of-summer-etc/

Is there a good biography out there on Nellie Fox?
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  #2  
Old 05-29-2014, 10:32 PM
Golden Sox Golden Sox is offline
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Default Nellie Fox

There was a decent book about Nellie Fox a few years ago. It's called Little Nel, The Nellie Fox Story by David Gough and Jim Bard.
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  #3  
Old 05-29-2014, 10:36 PM
DSpivack DSpivack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Sox View Post
There was a decent book about Nellie Fox a few years ago. It's called Little Nel, The Nellie Fox Story by David Gough and Jim Bard.
Thanks!
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  #4  
Old 05-30-2014, 08:24 AM
TommyJohn TommyJohn is offline
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I like the article, and the author brings up a point that I always notice-baseball (and sports in general) books with hilariously overreaching titles that make even the most mundane, little recalled moments out to be defining moments in the History of Mankind. Titles like:
XIII: The Steelers, the Cowboys, and the Game that Changed America Forever
When Time Stood Still: How the 1975 World Series Kept An Entire Nation Glued to its Seats and Changed America Forever
1947: The Year that Baseball United Us as a People, Taught Us All to Live Together As One, Gave Us a World Series with Joltin’ Joe and Jackie, and Changed America Forever.
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  #5  
Old 05-30-2014, 03:50 PM
fram40 fram40 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJohn View Post
I like the article, and the author brings up a point that I always notice-baseball (and sports in general) books with hilariously overreaching titles that make even the most mundane, little recalled moments out to be defining moments in the History of Mankind. Titles like:
XIII: The Steelers, the Cowboys, and the Game that Changed America Forever
When Time Stood Still: How the 1975 World Series Kept An Entire Nation Glued to its Seats and Changed America Forever
1947: The Year that Baseball United Us as a People, Taught Us All to Live Together As One, Gave Us a World Series with Joltin’ Joe and Jackie, and Changed America Forever.
The last title is the least preposterous.

Jackie Robinson did make a large contribution to changing America forever.
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  #6  
Old 06-02-2014, 09:53 AM
Irishsox1 Irishsox1 is offline
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Some writer actually wrote a book called:
Down to the Last Pitch: How the 1991 Minnesota Twins and Atlanta Braves Gave Us the Best World Series of All Time

No thanks reliving a World Series that took place in that nasty dome featuring memorable plays like outfielders losing the ball in the lights, infield choppers that bounce 30 feet in the air or players jumping high of plexiglass outfield walls.
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  #7  
Old 06-02-2014, 07:29 PM
TommyJohn TommyJohn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishsox1 View Post
Some writer actually wrote a book called:
Down to the Last Pitch: How the 1991 Minnesota Twins and Atlanta Braves Gave Us the Best World Series of All Time

No thanks reliving a World Series that took place in that nasty dome featuring memorable plays like outfielders losing the ball in the lights, infield choppers that bounce 30 feet in the air or players jumping high of plexiglass outfield walls.
Don't forget ******* first basemen doing body blocks on a baserunner and getting away with it.
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  #8  
Old 06-02-2014, 07:40 PM
soxfanatlanta soxfanatlanta is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyJohn View Post
Don't forget ******* first basemen doing body blocks on a baserunner and getting away with it.
Kent Hrbeck still has a price on his head round these parts...
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  #9  
Old 06-03-2014, 12:13 PM
TDog TDog is offline
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The 1947 baseball season actually did change America. That was before I was born, but from a historical perspective, I think that's pretty clear. If the 1975 World Series or any Super Bowl (I don't know when this one was played) changed America, it didn't change it so much that I noticed.

Among the hyperboles, there is a book about the greatest game ever pitched (that's pretty much the title), and it was played more than a decade before Kerry Wood was born, but I'm not sure that's hyperbole. In July 1963, Warren Spahn and Juan Marichal hooked up in a 16-inning game. Marichal pitched a 16-inning shutout. Spahn lost 1-0 on a one-out Willie Mays home run, long before such things were called walk-offs. Spahn was 42 and in the last superior season of his Hall of Fame career. Marichal was 25 and still had more than a decade left in his Hall of Fame career. In all, there were seven Hall of Famers that played all 16 innings that day.

A good book. A great game. But it didn't change America. It didn't even change baseball.
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  #10  
Old 06-03-2014, 12:34 PM
Irishsox1 Irishsox1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soxfanatlanta View Post
Kent Hrbeck still has a price on his head round these parts...
I totally forgot about that play, just another reason why I believe the 1991 World Series wasn't that good of a World Series and is by far the most overrated World Series of all time.

Hrbeck pulls of Gant video
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  #11  
Old 06-03-2014, 02:28 PM
SI1020 SI1020 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TDog View Post
The 1947 baseball season actually did change America. That was before I was born, but from a historical perspective, I think that's pretty clear. If the 1975 World Series or any Super Bowl (I don't know when this one was played) changed America, it didn't change it so much that I noticed.

Among the hyperboles, there is a book about the greatest game ever pitched (that's pretty much the title), and it was played more than a decade before Kerry Wood was born, but I'm not sure that's hyperbole. In July 1963, Warren Spahn and Juan Marichal hooked up in a 16-inning game. Marichal pitched a 16-inning shutout. Spahn lost 1-0 on a one-out Willie Mays home run, long before such things were called walk-offs. Spahn was 42 and in the last superior season of his Hall of Fame career. Marichal was 25 and still had more than a decade left in his Hall of Fame career. In all, there were seven Hall of Famers that played all 16 innings that day.

A good book. A great game. But it didn't change America. It didn't even change baseball.
You mean both managers left those pitchers in the game that long? The horror of it.
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  #12  
Old 03-15-2018, 01:19 AM
Wsoxmike59 Wsoxmike59 is offline
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Resurrecting an old thread about Baseball Books since a new season is almost upon us. I found this on Amazon and it looks like it might be an interesting read. A memoir from an old Sox Bat Boy during the 1965 season.

https://www.amazon.com/When-Grain-Ran-True-Memoirs-ebook/dp/B00ZGNEG7O/ref=cm_wl_huc_item
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  #13  
Old 03-15-2018, 04:14 AM
Grzegorz Grzegorz is offline
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https://www.amazon.com/dp/0060883529...585&sr=1-3-acs

https://www.amazon.com/Science-Hitti...baseball+books

https://www.amazon.com/Lou-Kicking-P...baseball+books

https://www.amazon.com/Texas-Heat-Ch...=horlen%2C+joe

https://www.amazon.com/Shades-Glory-...baseball+books

https://www.amazon.com/Youth-Basebal...baseball+books

Read the first two the others are on my list.
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  #14  
Old 03-15-2018, 07:42 AM
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Brian26 Brian26 is offline
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I read Jonah Keri’s book on the Expos over the winter. It’s really good. “Up, Up and Away”.

Also have a book on the shelf about 1981 season by Jeff Katz. Need to get to that soon. “Split Season”
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  #15  
Old 03-15-2018, 08:05 PM
DSpivack DSpivack is offline
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Yeah, I remember really liking that Expos book. Made me want to a start a game with the Expos ('94 or otherwise) on OOTP.
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