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  #31  
Old 07-25-2014, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by chicagowhitesox1 View Post
Wasn't Harry Caray on the field pleading fans to go back to their seats during disco demolition? I agree it was a embarrising part of baseball but it's still a famous moment.
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It was Bill Veeck on the field pleading with fans, not Harry.
Milw is correct. Veeck hobbled down to the field and was surrounded by a couple of Sox security guys as he pleaded on the microphone. Harry was pleading up in the booth. "Hey......we've had a lot of fun.....whaddaya say we play some baseball now........lot of room for you in the stands!" I think Harry also sang Take Me Out.... to no avail.

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Originally Posted by Milw
I know this is sacrilegious to say around these parts, but ask Joe Baseball Fan for his most memorable Harry Caray moment and I promise the vast majority will say something Cubs related. 1984 division clincher would be my guess, or maybe something from 89.
I don't know if it is sacrilegious or just reality. I'd probably pick a Cubs moment for Harry. You had to realize at this point that Harry's last Sox game was 33 years ago. So, anyone who even remembers his very last season with the Sox has to be, at the youngest, probably around 40 years old. If you remember his early years with the Sox, you're 50+. Nobody is getting younger around here

I'm not sure Harry had a defining moment. My two favorite memories is listening to him try to pronounce Hector Villanueva's name during some random early 90s WGN afternoon broadcast, and perhaps in the '84 NLCS (Game 4) when the Cubs took the lead on, I believe, Durham's homer, and he just about passed out in the radio booth.
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  #32  
Old 07-25-2014, 09:31 PM
Wedema Wedema is offline
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Originally Posted by chicagowhitesox1 View Post
Interesting about Caray being at the 51 game. But being a spectator, doesn't really give him a right to use that moment as part of his resume. I think you would have to agree with me on this.

Wasn't Harry Caray on the field pleading fans to go back to their seats during disco demolition? I agree it was a embarrising part of baseball but it's still a famous moment.

Caray did call the '51 NL Playoff game with Hodges for a "special broadcast back to St. Louis":

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/d6a6a34e
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  #33  
Old 07-25-2014, 09:37 PM
kba kba is offline
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Like I said before, I was also too young for the game and I'm just going by that ESPN segment. If people who actually witnessed the game say that Piersall and Gleason played a bigger part, then I have no reason to not believe this. I personally have always heard about Harry Carey playing a big part of calming fans down but I'm not gonna argue with guy's who were actually there. It is kinda funny in the Youtube video, Harry Carey catches a foul ball with that big net he always had in the first game of disco demolition.
The foul ball catch was the night before, and it happened just as Harry and Jimmy were promoting Disco Demolition Night; they were obviously baffled by the whole idea of the promotion.

During the telecast of the actual riot, for the first minute or so after the fans stormed the field, there were no announcers -- just live video from the home plate camera. After a while, Piersall came on with Bill Gleason, who I guess he was already planning to interview between games of the doubleheader. Once it became clear that there was going to be an extended delay, WSNS cut away from the ballpark and showed old movies. Harry and Jimmy came back on later to do a recap after the second game was called.

Piersall and Gleason's running commentary was pretty compelling -- two guys who weren't afraid to express an opinion (Jimmy called Dahl "a jerk" and said the event "was garbage"), but Harry wasn't part of it.

Last edited by kba; 07-25-2014 at 09:53 PM.
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  #34  
Old 07-25-2014, 09:53 PM
chicagowhitesox1 chicagowhitesox1 is offline
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Caray did call the '51 NL Playoff game with Hodges for a "special broadcast back to St. Louis":

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/d6a6a34e
That's a interesting bio on Carey. I think it's amazing that he was there and for a personal highlight it's gotta be a great feeling for him but he's still not known for being the guy who called the homerun. I shouldn't have said spectator. I thought he was Russ Hodges sidekick for the game so I figured he was just there as the play by play guy. I didn't realize other cities had live plug ins of games in 1951.

Yeah T-Dog called that. I was surprised that he would even be at the game. That had to be an amazing game for anyone to be at.
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  #35  
Old 07-25-2014, 10:03 PM
chicagowhitesox1 chicagowhitesox1 is offline
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The foul ball catch was the night before, and it happened just as Harry and Jimmy were promoting Disco Demolition Night; they were obviously baffled by the whole idea of the promotion.

During the telecast of the actual riot, for the first minute or so after the fans stormed the field, there were no announcers -- just live video from the home plate camera. After a while, Piersall came on with Bill Gleason, who I guess he was already planning to interview between games of the doubleheader. Once it became clear that there was going to be an extended delay, WSNS cut away from the ballpark and showed old movies. Harry and Jimmy came back on later to do a recap after the second game was called.

Piersall and Gleason's running commentary was pretty compelling -- two guys who weren't afraid to express an opinion (Jimmy called Dahl "a jerk" and said the event "was garbage"), but Harry wasn't part of it.

I watched the ESPN video of disco demolition and it show's Harry Carey up in the booth singing "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" and trying to calm the fans down when Bill Veeck was on the field. Obviously the whole ordeal wasn't all about Harry Carey but and I hate to say it, it probably was his most remembered moment in his broadcasting career. I know we all remember him for who he is but for a historical event. That's probably his biggest moment. If somebody want's to say Musials 3000th hit or the 51 homerun call was his most memorable moment, then so be it. I don't think they are. Hence is why my original post said "arguably".
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  #36  
Old 07-25-2014, 10:19 PM
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Obviously the whole ordeal wasn't all about Harry Carey but and I hate to say it, it probably was his most remembered moment in his broadcasting career. I know we all remember him for who he is but for a historical event. That's probably his biggest moment.
So memorable that you've been arguiing for the past day that he was on the field and never mentioned "Take Me Out..." until I posted it two hours ago. Get out of here. You're trolling now.
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  #37  
Old 07-25-2014, 11:02 PM
chicagowhitesox1 chicagowhitesox1 is offline
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So memorable that you've been arguiing for the past day that he was on the field and never mentioned "Take Me Out..." until I posted it two hours ago. Get out of here. You're trolling now.
.........................

Last edited by chicagowhitesox1; 07-26-2014 at 12:37 AM.
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  #38  
Old 07-25-2014, 11:09 PM
tstrike2000 tstrike2000 is offline
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Neither are really HOF announcers. However, if there was an award for most times leaving for a bathroom break in the middle of the seventh inning, requiring your partner to also do the play-by-play, then Hawk would win hands down.
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  #39  
Old 07-26-2014, 05:28 AM
TommyJohn TommyJohn is offline
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For the record for those interested:

Harry Carey was an actor (as was his son Harry Carey, Jr.)


Harry Caray was a baseball announcer.
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  #40  
Old 07-28-2014, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Wedema View Post
Caray did call the '51 NL Playoff game with Hodges for a "special broadcast back to St. Louis":

http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/d6a6a34e
Yes and Jack Brickhouse called Willie Mays great running catch in the 1954 World Series.
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  #41  
Old 07-28-2014, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by chicagowhitesox1 View Post
I watched the ESPN video of disco demolition and it show's Harry Carey up in the booth singing "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" and trying to calm the fans down when Bill Veeck was on the field. Obviously the whole ordeal wasn't all about Harry Carey but and I hate to say it, it probably was his most remembered moment in his broadcasting career. I know we all remember him for who he is but for a historical event. That's probably his biggest moment. If somebody want's to say Musials 3000th hit or the 51 homerun call was his most memorable moment, then so be it. I don't think they are. Hence is why my original post said "arguably".
Who is this Harry Carey you speak of? You obviously know little about the man who announced baseball for over 50 years. His career in radio goes back to 1944 when he went to work for hometown KXOK in St. Louis. Caray would write his own copy, conduct news interviews, and write and present editorials on the station, and he had a regular sports talk program as well. He began announcing St. Louis Cardinal games in 1945. Caray also called football (Missouri Tigers), ice hockey (St. Louis Flyers), basketball (Saint Louis Billikens, St. Louis Hawks, and Boston Celtics ) in the 1940s, 50s and '60s. Additionally, he broadcast eight Cotton Bowl games (195864, 1966) on network radio. He worked the 1964, 67, and 68 World Series for the Cardinals. In fact his greatest, most creative period was his 25 year tenure with the Cardinals. He more than deserves his Ford Frick award and all you can babble about is Disco Demolition.

Last edited by SI1020; 07-28-2014 at 02:18 PM.
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  #42  
Old 07-29-2014, 02:38 AM
fungo bat fungo bat is offline
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"Who is this Harry Carey you speak of? You obviously know little about the man who announced baseball for over 50 years. His career in radio goes back to 1944 when he went to work for hometown KXOK in St. Louis. Caray would write his own copy, conduct news interviews, and write and present editorials on the station, and he had a regular sports talk program as well. He began announcing St. Louis Cardinal games in 1945. Caray also called football (Missouri Tigers), ice hockey (St. Louis Flyers), basketball (Saint Louis Billikens, St. Louis Hawks, and Boston Celtics ) in the 1940s, 50s and '60s. Additionally, he broadcast eight Cotton Bowl games (195864, 1966) on network radio. He worked the 1964, 67, and 68 World Series for the Cardinals. In fact his greatest, most creative period was his 25 year tenure with the Cardinals. He more than deserves his Ford Frick award and all you can babble about is Disco Demolition."

You are 100% correct. The scope of the man's contributions to sports broadcasting spans nearly 50 years. Disco Demolition? Please. That was one small page in a very large book. Like or hate him, Harry had an enviable career as a sportscaster. I'm amazed he hasn't been named a winner of the Ford Frick award yet.
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  #43  
Old 07-29-2014, 03:18 AM
chicagowhitesox1 chicagowhitesox1 is offline
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Originally Posted by fungo bat View Post
"Who is this Harry Carey you speak of? You obviously know little about the man who announced baseball for over 50 years. His career in radio goes back to 1944 when he went to work for hometown KXOK in St. Louis. Caray would write his own copy, conduct news interviews, and write and present editorials on the station, and he had a regular sports talk program as well. He began announcing St. Louis Cardinal games in 1945. Caray also called football (Missouri Tigers), ice hockey (St. Louis Flyers), basketball (Saint Louis Billikens, St. Louis Hawks, and Boston Celtics ) in the 1940s, 50s and '60s. Additionally, he broadcast eight Cotton Bowl games (195864, 1966) on network radio. He worked the 1964, 67, and 68 World Series for the Cardinals. In fact his greatest, most creative period was his 25 year tenure with the Cardinals. He more than deserves his Ford Frick award and all you can babble about is Disco Demolition."

You are 100% correct. The scope of the man's contributions to sports broadcasting spans nearly 50 years. Disco Demolition? Please. That was one small page in a very large book. Like or hate him, Harry had an enviable career as a sportscaster. I'm amazed he hasn't been named a winner of the Ford Frick award yet.
It's a large book but that small page would have been the most read page in that large book....Also on page 1 of this thread and post #5, you will see that Harry Caray was honored with the Ford Frick Award in 1989.

Was Harry Caray a great announcer? I always liked him but he's really no better than Ken Harrelson is. Although if I had to choose, I would much rather listen to Harry Caray. Both of them started out as really good announcers and as years went by they both became homers. I'm not trying to rip on Harry Caray but lets be honest, his last 10 or 15 years were a big drunk fest.

I also apologize if my misspelling of Caray offended anyone. Odd thing happened earlier today....I was watching the 1985 movie "Mask" and Harry Carey Jr. the actor came up on the end credits.
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  #44  
Old 07-29-2014, 11:28 AM
SI1020 SI1020 is offline
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Originally Posted by chicagowhitesox1 View Post
It's a large book but that small page would have been the most read page in that large book....Also on page 1 of this thread and post #5, you will see that Harry Caray was honored with the Ford Frick Award in 1989.

Was Harry Caray a great announcer? I always liked him but he's really no better than Ken Harrelson is. Although if I had to choose, I would much rather listen to Harry Caray. Both of them started out as really good announcers and as years went by they both became homers. I'm not trying to rip on Harry Caray but lets be honest, his last 10 or 15 years were a big drunk fest.

I also apologize if my misspelling of Caray offended anyone. Odd thing happened earlier today....I was watching the 1985 movie "Mask" and Harry Carey Jr. the actor came up on the end credits.
Back in the transistor radio days of my youth I would occasionally tune in at night to Harry Caray on KMOX. It was a pleasure to listen to him call a game, and he was always a homer. Harry, a native of St. Louis loved his Cardinals. He would have stayed there for the duration but was fired after the 1969 season for reasons that we shall not go into here. I'm sorry, I mean you no disrespect, but you've really missed the boat here. You can like him or not. We now live in the era of the Dewayne Staats and Len Kasper school of broadcasting. In his prime Harry was considered to be among the elite PBP men in the game. Guys like Caray, Bob Prince and Mel Allen (my favorite) weren't just calling a MLB game. They were forces of nature.
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  #45  
Old 07-29-2014, 02:07 PM
Paulwny Paulwny is offline
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Back in the transistor radio days of my youth I would occasionally tune in at night to Harry Caray on KMOX. It was a pleasure to listen to him call a game, and he was always a homer. Harry, a native of St. Louis loved his Cardinals. He would have stayed there for the duration but was fired after the 1969 season for reasons that we shall not go into here. I'm sorry, I mean you no disrespect, but you've really missed the boat here. You can like him or not. We now live in the era of the Dewayne Staats and Len Kasper school of broadcasting. In his prime Harry was considered to be among the elite PBP men in the game. Guys like Caray, Bob Prince and Mel Allen (my favorite) weren't just calling a MLB game. They were forces of nature.
As much as I hated the Yanks, Mel Allen was a joy to listen to broadcasting a game. He actually turned me into a sox fan when I was 11 yrs. old.
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