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  #16  
Old 07-07-2012, 10:19 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Originally Posted by fisk4ever View Post
BRDSR---This is my new favorite thread. Thanks for putting it on the board!
Thanks. I hope others like it, and I'm enjoying putting it together, if only as a way to learn White Sox history. Before I started this, I had no idea who Don Buford was, and it turns out he was really a significant part of the '65 team. And in the grand scheme of things, he was a pretty talented major league ballplayer. Now I know!
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  #17  
Old 07-08-2012, 07:40 AM
LITTLE NELL LITTLE NELL is offline
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Originally Posted by BRDSR View Post
Thanks. I hope others like it, and I'm enjoying putting it together, if only as a way to learn White Sox history. Before I started this, I had no idea who Don Buford was, and it turns out he was really a significant part of the '65 team. And in the grand scheme of things, he was a pretty talented major league ballplayer. Now I know!
Had a hard time warming up to Buford since he replaced my all time favorite player a year earlier.
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  #18  
Old 07-09-2012, 02:00 AM
PeteWard PeteWard is offline
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Saw my first game as a five-year old in Comiskey in 65. Sox beat Boston. I think Horlen pitched. That's all I remember about the game except I sat along the right field foul line upper deck and was afraid of the height at first.
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  #19  
Old 07-09-2012, 08:47 AM
TomBradley72 TomBradley72 is offline
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Originally Posted by PeteWard View Post
Saw my first game as a five-year old in Comiskey in 65. Sox beat Boston. I think Horlen pitched. That's all I remember about the game except I sat along the right field foul line upper deck and was afraid of the height at first.
This looks like the only game Horlen started at home vs. BOS that year (Game 1 of a Twi-Night DH- I miss those)

http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1...271CHA1965.htm
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  #20  
Old 07-09-2012, 09:27 AM
soxfan1965 soxfan1965 is offline
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Originally Posted by BRDSR View Post
Thanks. I hope others like it, and I'm enjoying putting it together, if only as a way to learn White Sox history. Before I started this, I had no idea who Don Buford was, and it turns out he was really a significant part of the '65 team. And in the grand scheme of things, he was a pretty talented major league ballplayer. Now I know!
I liked Buford's speed and versitility (switch hitting, infield/outfield) that was supplemented by Tommie Agee (and both got World Series rings) the next year. He was a good sport on Sox photo day, flashing a nice smile and arm around the shoulder for this young fan. He played in Japan at the end of his career. He and his sons were USC alum. His one son is a prominent orthopedic surgeon. He's still living so it would be nice to get him back to Chicago somehow (and others like Ken Berry), like they did Dick Allen and Goose Gossage.
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  #21  
Old 07-09-2012, 09:51 AM
PeteWard PeteWard is offline
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Originally Posted by TomBradley72 View Post
This looks like the only game Horlen started at home vs. BOS that year (Game 1 of a Twi-Night DH- I miss those)

http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1...271CHA1965.htm
Wow thanks but it was definitely not a DH unless my mom made us go home after Game 1 which is possible as we were young.
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  #22  
Old 07-09-2012, 10:49 AM
Procol Harum Procol Harum is offline
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Nice new thread BRDSR.

The 1965 season took me from 5th to 6th grade. It was the summer that I was on my one and only championship team in any sport as a strong-hitting catcher/first baseman for my Little League team (named, to my chagrin, the Yankees!). It was a summer where I became briefly enthralled with surfer comics and hot rods to supplement my abiding interests in reading history and listening to the still British Invasion-dominated sounds of WLS' Top 40 format.

It was also the summer that I had my first encounter with death's severe hand as my paternal grandfather passed away down in NC. It was at that funeral--actually during the viewing at my grandparents' house, they were still in the habit there of taking the body "home" one last time and setting the coffin out in the parlor--where, during the year of the March on Selma that I saw two of my grandfather's black neighbors from the filling station down the road come forward, hesitant, hats in hand, unsure about the propriety of stepping foot in a white man's house, until reassured by my grandmother that they could come in and pay their respects. They say the past is a different country. Indeed.

I entered the 1965 baseball season fueled with hope--the previous year's White Sox team's anemic hitting and excellent pitching staff had, after all, lifted us to a 98-win season that had fallen one desperate game short of the hated Yankees. If only we (and it was always "we") had been able to win just two--two stinkin' games!--of the first ten games we had played against the Yankees the pennant would have been ours! Surely, there was reason for optimism going into '65--the White Sox pitching staff was a close, close second to the Dodgers' unworldly staff featuring the likes of Koufax, Drysdale and Osteen. In looking at the entire staff from starters through bullpen--a good argument could be made that perhaps Sox pitching was stronger even than that of Los Angeles.

And there was even hope that our inept offense just might be ready to do something. In the off season we had strengthened our club after having re-acquired "Honey" John Romano to add some punch along with a good-looking outfielder acquired from the Phillies named Danny Cater. The '64 lineup promised better, revolving around our star 3rd baseman Pete Ward who had given the dodge to the sophomore slump after his near-miss Rookie of the Year 1963 season posting a .282 ba, driving in 94 runs, and banging out 23 home runs (23! It's hard now to convey just how awesome those sorts of numbers looked for a White Sox player during that era of the pitcher). With Floyd Robinson out in RF, our tall, lanky power-hitting shortstop Ron Hansen, and the big bat of first baseman Moose Skowron (on hand for the entire season this time) it looked like the Sox would be able to make their move.

And from the start it looked good--an opening day win and a decent start while the Yankees so uncharacteristically stumbled out of the gate. In May there was a 9 or 10-game winning streak that I followed excitedly every morning in the pages of "The Bright One", the Chicago Sun-Times. But alas...the Twins, with that horde of great hitters Killebrew, Allison, Hall, Versailles, Mincher, Rollins, Oliva, and the ex-Sox prospect Earl Battey suddenly came up with great seasons from the likes of veteran pitchers such as Camillo Pascual, 21-game winner Jim "Mudcat Grant," Jim Perry, and Jim Kaat; the previous season's 6th place team suddenly gelled and began playing great baseball. And the Sox? A few key injuries undercut the team. The pitching was not quite as good as it had been in '64 although it was still very good and, unimaginably, the hitting was even worse. I learned a lot about expectations, realities, ideals, disappointments, baseball and life that year...

Last edited by Procol Harum; 07-09-2012 at 11:03 AM.
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  #23  
Old 07-09-2012, 01:33 PM
shes shes is offline
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Great thread!

I began collecting baseball (and basketball) cards in the early nineties when I was 6 or 7 and they were an incredible source of information for a kid who was looking to gobble up as much information about baseball history as he could. I also read almanacs, player biographies and the Kahn/Halberstam books as well. To this day, I remember very little about what I learned in school at that age but I distinctly remember poring over lists on the all-time and yearly home run leaders, hits leaders, etc. I remember coming across names like Mel Ott and Harmon Killebrew near the top of these lists, not knowing who they were, and then finding a book that could clue me in. To this day I can tell you that Ott hit 511 home runs, which was 1 fewer than Banks and Eddie Matthews and 10 fewer than Williams and McCovey. I remember reading the back of a Dale Murphy card that called him something like the "ghost of a once-great slugger trying to hold on for just a couple more home runs and a shot at the HOF." (He retired with 398 -- I guess once upon a time 400 was a lot bigger deal in terms of HOF credentials) and feeling sorry for him. I know that Boggs hit over .360 four times before he was 30 (!) but was never close to winning an MVP (probably should have won in '87), which boggled my young mind. I have retained all this knowledge and forgotten all about virtually everything else -- guess I've always had baseball on the brain.

Every year my mom asks me what to do with all the boxes of cards that are just taking up space in my old room. I don't yet have the heart to tell her to just get rid of 'em. Too many memories attached.
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  #24  
Old 07-09-2012, 02:53 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Awesome posts, especially Procol's. It's amazing how an avid fan will contextualize the rest of his/her life based on his/her favorite team. I know I still do.
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  #25  
Old 07-09-2012, 06:17 PM
TomBradley72 TomBradley72 is offline
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Originally Posted by Procol Harum View Post
Nice new thread BRDSR.

The 1965 season took me from 5th to 6th grade. It was the summer that I was on my one and only championship team in any sport as a strong-hitting catcher/first baseman for my Little League team (named, to my chagrin, the Yankees!). It was a summer where I became briefly enthralled with surfer comics and hot rods to supplement my abiding interests in reading history and listening to the still British Invasion-dominated sounds of WLS' Top 40 format.

It was also the summer that I had my first encounter with death's severe hand as my paternal grandfather passed away down in NC. It was at that funeral--actually during the viewing at my grandparents' house, they were still in the habit there of taking the body "home" one last time and setting the coffin out in the parlor--where, during the year of the March on Selma that I saw two of my grandfather's black neighbors from the filling station down the road come forward, hesitant, hats in hand, unsure about the propriety of stepping foot in a white man's house, until reassured by my grandmother that they could come in and pay their respects. They say the past is a different country. Indeed.

I entered the 1965 baseball season fueled with hope--the previous year's White Sox team's anemic hitting and excellent pitching staff had, after all, lifted us to a 98-win season that had fallen one desperate game short of the hated Yankees. If only we (and it was always "we") had been able to win just two--two stinkin' games!--of the first ten games we had played against the Yankees the pennant would have been ours! Surely, there was reason for optimism going into '65--the White Sox pitching staff was a close, close second to the Dodgers' unworldly staff featuring the likes of Koufax, Drysdale and Osteen. In looking at the entire staff from starters through bullpen--a good argument could be made that perhaps Sox pitching was stronger even than that of Los Angeles.

And there was even hope that our inept offense just might be ready to do something. In the off season we had strengthened our club after having re-acquired "Honey" John Romano to add some punch along with a good-looking outfielder acquired from the Phillies named Danny Cater. The '64 lineup promised better, revolving around our star 3rd baseman Pete Ward who had given the dodge to the sophomore slump after his near-miss Rookie of the Year 1963 season posting a .282 ba, driving in 94 runs, and banging out 23 home runs (23! It's hard now to convey just how awesome those sorts of numbers looked for a White Sox player during that era of the pitcher). With Floyd Robinson out in RF, our tall, lanky power-hitting shortstop Ron Hansen, and the big bat of first baseman Moose Skowron (on hand for the entire season this time) it looked like the Sox would be able to make their move.

And from the start it looked good--an opening day win and a decent start while the Yankees so uncharacteristically stumbled out of the gate. In May there was a 9 or 10-game winning streak that I followed excitedly every morning in the pages of "The Bright One", the Chicago Sun-Times. But alas...the Twins, with that horde of great hitters Killebrew, Allison, Hall, Versailles, Mincher, Rollins, Oliva, and the ex-Sox prospect Earl Battey suddenly came up with great seasons from the likes of veteran pitchers such as Camillo Pascual, 21-game winner Jim "Mudcat Grant," Jim Perry, and Jim Kaat; the previous season's 6th place team suddenly gelled and began playing great baseball. And the Sox? A few key injuries undercut the team. The pitching was not quite as good as it had been in '64 although it was still very good and, unimaginably, the hitting was even worse. I learned a lot about expectations, realities, ideals, disappointments, baseball and life that year...
A great read on many levels- thank you for posting this.
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  #26  
Old 07-09-2012, 10:48 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Default Smoky Burgess





A major-leaguer for parts of 18 seasons, Smoky Burgess was signed at 17 years old by the Chicago Cubs in 1944. He broke into the majors with the Cubs in 1949 and would go on to play for five different clubs. He consistently hit for respectable batting averages, finishing his career at .295, but never hit more than 21 homers in a season and finished with relatively low career power numbers; 230 doubles; 126 homers, and 673 RBI. Burgess never took the field at any position other than catcher, where he fielded at a .988 clip and threw out 213 of 583 base stealers. To this writerís knowledge, he holds the distinction of being the only catcher to catch more than 9 consecutive perfect innings in a single game when, on May 26th, 1959, he helped Harvey Haddix retire 36 consecutive batters before giving up an unearned run in the 13th to lose 1-0. In 11 seasons between 1954 and 1964, Burgess made six National League all-star teams, even cracking the starting lineup in 1961. By the time he was picked up on the waiver-wire by the White Sox in September 1964, Burgess was used almost exclusively as a pinch-hitter. He would retire after the 1967 season with 145 career pinch hits, a record that wasnít broken until 1979 by Manny Mota. Burgess now sits fourth on the all-time pinch-hits list.

1965 was indicative of Burgessís last years in the league. Burgess appeared in 80 games, but he was third on the catching depth chart behind Johnny Romano and J.C. Martin, and only appeared in five games behind the plate, three as a starter. Burgess pinch-hit 75 times in í65 and made the most of them. He batted .286 on the season, and with 24 RBI in 89 plate appearances, his rate of one RBI per 3.7 plate appearances was better than anyone on the team with more than 10 plate appearances. (Marv Staehle picked up two RBI in seven plate appearances.) His late-game appearances put him at the plate during lots of crucial situations, such as in the 7th inning of the second game of a double header against the Detroit Tigers on May 5, 1965.

The Sox came into the day a half-game ahead of the Twins, who were only playing one game on May 5th. Heading into the night game, White Sox had gone 4-2 since their win on April 27th, including a 4-0 four-hit shutout victory by John Buzhardt earlier in the day. In the nightcap, Joe Horlen and Tigers pitcher Dave Wickersham were locked in a 0-0 contest until the bottom of the 6th when leadoff hitter Dick McAuliffe hit an inside-the-park home run to the cavernous center field of Tigers Stadium. (The wall was 440 feet from home plate just to the left of dead center.) Down one coming into the top of the 7th, Pete Ward walked, Bill Skowron doubled, and Ron Hansen was intentionally walked. Ken Berry was due up, but his .200 batting average prompted Al Lopez to pinch-hit Burgess instead. Burgess stroked a single, scoring Ward and Skowron, and was promptly taken out for pinch-runner Tommy McCraw. The Sox would score two more runs that inning and win 4-1, but all they needed was the one at-bat from Burgess.

The Sox moved to 13-5 and, in sweeping the double-header, improved to one game ahead of the Twins, who also won that day. And if a child had looked at the back of Burgessís baseball card that day, he probably would have simply been impressed at how long heíd been playing. Most kids enamored with baseball cards were under 16 years old, which means the child looking at the back of Burgessís would not have been born when he broke into the big leagues.
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  #27  
Old 07-09-2012, 11:12 PM
BigKlu59 BigKlu59 is offline
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Hey BRDSR.... Thanks for the flashbacks. Smokey was the man. He always had a knack for poking it thru some hole and moving them around the bases. If you could say he was an original DH before its time. Not understanding his physical limitations and age and success rate on those ptching and defence Sox teams, I used to ask my Dad why he wasnt an every day player.. He used to laugh and say he could be the father of some of the guys on the diamond. Yup, Smokey had been in the bigs since Korea and had quite a resume on the flip side of his card.

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  #28  
Old 07-10-2012, 11:47 PM
MikeW MikeW is offline
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I was 10 years old in 1965 and growing up in New Jersey. Rooting for the Sox in Yankee territory was not any easy thing to do. I am proud to say that I have every White Sox baseball card since 1949 and quite a few before that. Also many programs,yearbooks seats from Comiskey and over 600 Sox autographs.
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  #29  
Old 07-11-2012, 12:03 PM
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As a kid who was negative-four in 1965, I am thoroughly enjoying this read. Thanks for taking the time and sharing the cards!
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  #30  
Old 07-11-2012, 12:40 PM
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Chez Chez is online now
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Smoky Burgess could be the slowest position player in White Sox history. But he could hit.
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