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  #31  
Old 01-29-2018, 01:11 PM
beasly213 beasly213 is offline
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I always like reading about SoxFest here (Who you met, interesting stories, autographs you got etc.) So lets hear about it!
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  #32  
Old 01-29-2018, 06:24 PM
BainesHOF BainesHOF is offline
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The long shot came in Friday. Line integrity was more or less preserved on the first day of SoxFest for the first time in years. Each increment of 30-40 people were jumbled a bit due to being herded into holding pens for the opening ceremony, but that was a minor quibble compared to problems of past years.

Overall, the SoxFest mood was very positive. There is a good vibe among the young players, and between most players and fans. Most experiences at official signing sessions were good if not downright great, and many players signed many extra autographs whether in the lobby in the morning or in the kids/social lounge area throughout SoxFest. Some players just hung around in that area and signed, talked with fans and posed for pictures informally. Despite the sizeable number of hotel guests, Friday was pretty good for autograph seekers. The lines moved pretty quickly and you could move from stage to stage in relatively decent fashion. Saturday was the most crowded, but you could still have success as long as you were willing to wait. I arrived in line at 4:45 a.m. and there were already 250 people in front of me. Sunday saw crowds thin as some people left after checking out of their rooms. People who stuck out the whole weekend were rewarded with a couple more autographs or pictures.

As I said, most players were cool with fans and accommodated reasonable requests. Sanchez and Delmonico were particularly outgoing with everyone. I had good experiences with Burger, Renteria, Moncada, Contreras and Loaiza. Abreu really takes time to give everyone a good autograph to the point where he could be seen rubbing his hand over his Sports Illustrated covers to remove the gloss so the Sharpie would take to them better. He's a gem. After one seminar, I heard Rodon stayed and signed an autograph for every single person who wanted one. Kopech personalized his autographs. Many fans wanted an autograph from Jimenez. He was a bit weird when it came to signing balls. He would "sweet spot" some, which is what collectors want, and "side panel" others. I was lucky and got a sweet spot signature. While on this subject, Davidson sidepaneled me. That's just a jerk move. I dropped close to $1K this weekend and waited around two hours to get him. I don't sell my stuff. For him to ruin a ball like that (which aren't cheap these days) and waste my time sucks. I heard many people say Hansen acted like he didn't want to be there. The autograph he gave my 14-year-old nephew was just lines drawn up and down in a scribble. However, Steve Stone continued his reign as Jerk of SoxFest, going out of his way to sign/draw stupid stuff on some people's items to wreck them in his warped attempt to demean people right to their face. He's known for doing this. His introduction at the opening ceremony was the only one to draw some boos. I used to talk with him about our dogs each year at SoxFest, but after watching him cut down a polite fan right in front of me last year I don't want anything to do with the guy. The sooner he leaves the organization the better.

One of the great things about SoxFest is how you can have random encounters with people while walking around. I ran into Hahn and asked him how it looked for Abreu staying. "He'll be with us this year," he said, looking me dead in the eye. I saw Rodon walking by and asked when he'd be back. "May," he said, iffy and hopefully with a shrug of his shoulders. I got to shake Renteria's hand and tell him how much I like him as our manager.

My nephew hit an official photo session with his favorite player, Tim Anderson. A professional photographer took the photos using a flash, and my nephew's photo with Anderson came out beautifully.

The seminars can often be entertaining. Unfortunately, I only found the time to attend one, but it was a good one on the 1983 season with Fisk, Kittle and Baines. Fisk gave some particularly thoughtful and insightful answers. A fan asked about Dybzynski's baserunning blunder and Fisk defended him, saying Leyland waved runners home almost every time that season and he couldn't blame Dybzynski for thinking Fletcher was going to try to score from second and running hard to make it to third base. He had a lot of nice things to say about Dybzynski and called him "a gamer." Another fan asked what they thought about LaRussa leaving in Burns for the 10th inning of Game 4. Fisk said had a problem with it in one aspect. He said LaRussa asked Burns how he felt after nine and Burns said he felt good and Fisk told LaRussa he was still throwing well. What rubbed Fisk the wrong way was that LaRussa then told Burns, "Okay, it's your game to win or lose." Fisk said it was the team's game to win or lose. Kittle told a couple good stories about Hoyt. He said Hoyt was reading a scouting report and flipping a ball and Kittle asked him what he thought. Hoyt flipped up the ball, caught it and stuck it in his pocket, responding, "I've got 'em in my back pocket." When reporters gathered around Hoyt after a victory, one told Hoyt that he threw 86 pitches. "And 84 were on the black," Hoyt said. Lots of good stuff in this seminar. I wish it could have last twice as long. Unfortunately, Farmer hosted it and often broke people's train of thought, and for some reason talked about his times with the Sox.

The Garage Sale had some good stuff as usual, but you had to find it. I picked up nice bats of Abreu ($350) and Garcia ($175). A Sale jersey went for $500 and a couple Abreu jerseys were sold for $650.

Just when things looked like SoxFest would go off without a big hitch, Sunday's line to enter took a screwy turn. Hotel security had people line up in the hallway facing away from SoxFest for hours. Eventually, SoxFest officials led the line back to the SoxFest ballroom in a weird route that went through the hotel bar. There was a period of time while waiting in the ballroom that nobody could leave the room. When a wristband system was announced that would allow people to go to the bathroom, get something to eat, etc., about 100 people flocked to the door. As silly as this was, some people actually applauded the proceedings since at least line integrity was being preserved.

I saw someone on Facebook today say this was the last year the Hilton would host SoxFest and that the Sox are trying to move it to McCormick Place. If true, it looks like the Sox are plotting to make it an even bigger event and moneymaker.
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  #33  
Old 01-29-2018, 07:06 PM
ricker182 ricker182 is offline
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Originally Posted by BainesHOF View Post
The long shot came in Friday. Line integrity was more or less preserved on the first day of SoxFest for the first time in years. Each increment of 30-40 people were jumbled a bit due to being herded into holding pens for the opening ceremony, but that was a minor quibble compared to problems of past years.

Overall, the SoxFest mood was very positive. There is a good vibe among the young players, and between most players and fans. Most experiences at official signing sessions were good if not downright great, and many players signed many extra autographs whether in the lobby in the morning or in the kids/social lounge area throughout SoxFest. Some players just hung around in that area and signed, talked with fans and posed for pictures informally. Despite the sizeable number of hotel guests, Friday was pretty good for autograph seekers. The lines moved pretty quickly and you could move from stage to stage in relatively decent fashion. Saturday was the most crowded, but you could still have success as long as you were willing to wait. I arrived in line at 4:45 a.m. and there were already 250 people in front of me. Sunday saw crowds thin as some people left after checking out of their rooms. People who stuck out the whole weekend were rewarded with a couple more autographs or pictures.

As I said, most players were cool with fans and accommodated reasonable requests. Sanchez and Delmonico were particularly outgoing with everyone. I had good experiences with Burger, Renteria, Moncada, Contreras and Loaiza. Abreu really takes time to give everyone a good autograph to the point where he could be seen rubbing his hand over his Sports Illustrated covers to remove the gloss so the Sharpie would take to them better. He's a gem. After one seminar, I heard Rodon stayed and signed an autograph for every single person who wanted one. Kopech personalized his autographs. Many fans wanted an autograph from Jimenez. He was a bit weird when it came to signing balls. He would "sweet spot" some, which is what collectors want, and "side panel" others. I was lucky and got a sweet spot signature. While on this subject, Davidson sidepaneled me. That's just a jerk move. I dropped close to $1K this weekend and waited around two hours to get him. I don't sell my stuff. For him to ruin a ball like that (which aren't cheap these days) and waste my time sucks. I heard many people say Hansen acted like he didn't want to be there. The autograph he gave my 14-year-old nephew was just lines drawn up and down in a scribble. However, Steve Stone continued his reign as Jerk of SoxFest, going out of his way to sign/draw stupid stuff on some people's items to wreck them in his warped attempt to demean people right to their face. He's known for doing this. His introduction at the opening ceremony was the only one to draw some boos. I used to talk with him about our dogs each year at SoxFest, but after watching him cut down a polite fan right in front of me last year I don't want anything to do with the guy. The sooner he leaves the organization the better.

One of the great things about SoxFest is how you can have random encounters with people while walking around. I ran into Hahn and asked him how it looked for Abreu staying. "He'll be with us this year," he said, looking me dead in the eye. I saw Rodon walking by and asked when he'd be back. "May," he said, iffy and hopefully with a shrug of his shoulders. I got to shake Renteria's hand and tell him how much I like him as our manager.

My nephew hit an official photo session with his favorite player, Tim Anderson. A professional photographer took the photos using a flash, and my nephew's photo with Anderson came out beautifully.

The seminars can often be entertaining. Unfortunately, I only found the time to attend one, but it was a good one on the 1983 season with Fisk, Kittle and Baines. Fisk gave some particularly thoughtful and insightful answers. A fan asked about Dybzynski's baserunning blunder and Fisk defended him, saying Leyland waved runners home almost every time that season and he couldn't blame Dybzynski for thinking Fletcher was going to try to score from second and running hard to make it to third base. He had a lot of nice things to say about Dybzynski and called him "a gamer." Another fan asked what they thought about LaRussa leaving in Burns for the 10th inning of Game 4. Fisk said had a problem with it in one aspect. He said LaRussa asked Burns how he felt after nine and Burns said he felt good and Fisk told LaRussa he was still throwing well. What rubbed Fisk the wrong way was that LaRussa then told Burns, "Okay, it's your game to win or lose." Fisk said it was the team's game to win or lose. Kittle told a couple good stories about Hoyt. He said Hoyt was reading a scouting report and flipping a ball and Kittle asked him what he thought. Hoyt flipped up the ball, caught it and stuck it in his pocket, responding, "I've got 'em in my back pocket." When reporters gathered around Hoyt after a victory, one told Hoyt that he threw 86 pitches. "And 84 were on the black," Hoyt said. Lots of good stuff in this seminar. I wish it could have last twice as long. Unfortunately, Farmer hosted it and often broke people's train of thought, and for some reason talked about his times with the Sox.

The Garage Sale had some good stuff as usual, but you had to find it. I picked up nice bats of Abreu ($350) and Garcia ($175). A Sale jersey went for $500 and a couple Abreu jerseys were sold for $650.

Just when things looked like SoxFest would go off without a big hitch, Sunday's line to enter took a screwy turn. Hotel security had people line up in the hallway facing away from SoxFest for hours. Eventually, SoxFest officials led the line back to the SoxFest ballroom in a weird route that went through the hotel bar. There was a period of time while waiting in the ballroom that nobody could leave the room. When a wristband system was announced that would allow people to go to the bathroom, get something to eat, etc., about 100 people flocked to the door. As silly as this was, some people actually applauded the proceedings since at least line integrity was being preserved.

I saw someone on Facebook today say this was the last year the Hilton would host SoxFest and that the Sox are trying to move it to McCormick Place. If true, it looks like the Sox are plotting to make it an even bigger event and moneymaker.
I had a great time this year.
Moncada and Eloy were very iffy about signing outside of their sessions.
Kinda crappy as "new" guys IMO.

Yolmer was the star of the whole weekend. That guy is awesome and really down to earth.

Definitely seemed like the most crowded year ever.
If they are actually talking about moving to McCormick place, I'm not sure I will attend. I like the hotel setup.
I actually miss the Palmer House, but I think the Sox outgrew that place.
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  #34  
Old 01-29-2018, 08:59 PM
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Brian26 Brian26 is offline
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Originally Posted by BainesHOF View Post
The long shot came in Friday. Line integrity was more or less preserved on the first day of SoxFest for the first time in years. Each increment of 30-40 people were jumbled a bit due to being herded into holding pens for the opening ceremony, but that was a minor quibble compared to problems of past years.

Overall, the SoxFest mood was very positive. There is a good vibe among the young players, and between most players and fans. Most experiences at official signing sessions were good if not downright great, and many players signed many extra autographs whether in the lobby in the morning or in the kids/social lounge area throughout SoxFest. Some players just hung around in that area and signed, talked with fans and posed for pictures informally. Despite the sizeable number of hotel guests, Friday was pretty good for autograph seekers. The lines moved pretty quickly and you could move from stage to stage in relatively decent fashion. Saturday was the most crowded, but you could still have success as long as you were willing to wait. I arrived in line at 4:45 a.m. and there were already 250 people in front of me. Sunday saw crowds thin as some people left after checking out of their rooms. People who stuck out the whole weekend were rewarded with a couple more autographs or pictures.

As I said, most players were cool with fans and accommodated reasonable requests. Sanchez and Delmonico were particularly outgoing with everyone. I had good experiences with Burger, Renteria, Moncada, Contreras and Loaiza. Abreu really takes time to give everyone a good autograph to the point where he could be seen rubbing his hand over his Sports Illustrated covers to remove the gloss so the Sharpie would take to them better. He's a gem. After one seminar, I heard Rodon stayed and signed an autograph for every single person who wanted one. Kopech personalized his autographs. Many fans wanted an autograph from Jimenez. He was a bit weird when it came to signing balls. He would "sweet spot" some, which is what collectors want, and "side panel" others. I was lucky and got a sweet spot signature. While on this subject, Davidson sidepaneled me. That's just a jerk move. I dropped close to $1K this weekend and waited around two hours to get him. I don't sell my stuff. For him to ruin a ball like that (which aren't cheap these days) and waste my time sucks. I heard many people say Hansen acted like he didn't want to be there. The autograph he gave my 14-year-old nephew was just lines drawn up and down in a scribble. However, Steve Stone continued his reign as Jerk of SoxFest, going out of his way to sign/draw stupid stuff on some people's items to wreck them in his warped attempt to demean people right to their face. He's known for doing this. His introduction at the opening ceremony was the only one to draw some boos. I used to talk with him about our dogs each year at SoxFest, but after watching him cut down a polite fan right in front of me last year I don't want anything to do with the guy. The sooner he leaves the organization the better.

One of the great things about SoxFest is how you can have random encounters with people while walking around. I ran into Hahn and asked him how it looked for Abreu staying. "He'll be with us this year," he said, looking me dead in the eye. I saw Rodon walking by and asked when he'd be back. "May," he said, iffy and hopefully with a shrug of his shoulders. I got to shake Renteria's hand and tell him how much I like him as our manager.

My nephew hit an official photo session with his favorite player, Tim Anderson. A professional photographer took the photos using a flash, and my nephew's photo with Anderson came out beautifully.

The seminars can often be entertaining. Unfortunately, I only found the time to attend one, but it was a good one on the 1983 season with Fisk, Kittle and Baines. Fisk gave some particularly thoughtful and insightful answers. A fan asked about Dybzynski's baserunning blunder and Fisk defended him, saying Leyland waved runners home almost every time that season and he couldn't blame Dybzynski for thinking Fletcher was going to try to score from second and running hard to make it to third base. He had a lot of nice things to say about Dybzynski and called him "a gamer." Another fan asked what they thought about LaRussa leaving in Burns for the 10th inning of Game 4. Fisk said had a problem with it in one aspect. He said LaRussa asked Burns how he felt after nine and Burns said he felt good and Fisk told LaRussa he was still throwing well. What rubbed Fisk the wrong way was that LaRussa then told Burns, "Okay, it's your game to win or lose." Fisk said it was the team's game to win or lose. Kittle told a couple good stories about Hoyt. He said Hoyt was reading a scouting report and flipping a ball and Kittle asked him what he thought. Hoyt flipped up the ball, caught it and stuck it in his pocket, responding, "I've got 'em in my back pocket." When reporters gathered around Hoyt after a victory, one told Hoyt that he threw 86 pitches. "And 84 were on the black," Hoyt said. Lots of good stuff in this seminar. I wish it could have last twice as long. Unfortunately, Farmer hosted it and often broke people's train of thought, and for some reason talked about his times with the Sox.

The Garage Sale had some good stuff as usual, but you had to find it. I picked up nice bats of Abreu ($350) and Garcia ($175). A Sale jersey went for $500 and a couple Abreu jerseys were sold for $650.

Just when things looked like SoxFest would go off without a big hitch, Sunday's line to enter took a screwy turn. Hotel security had people line up in the hallway facing away from SoxFest for hours. Eventually, SoxFest officials led the line back to the SoxFest ballroom in a weird route that went through the hotel bar. There was a period of time while waiting in the ballroom that nobody could leave the room. When a wristband system was announced that would allow people to go to the bathroom, get something to eat, etc., about 100 people flocked to the door. As silly as this was, some people actually applauded the proceedings since at least line integrity was being preserved.

I saw someone on Facebook today say this was the last year the Hilton would host SoxFest and that the Sox are trying to move it to McCormick Place. If true, it looks like the Sox are plotting to make it an even bigger event and moneymaker.
The only thing better than Soxfest is the annual BainesHOF recap. Love reading these.
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  #35  
Old 01-30-2018, 01:35 AM
BainesHOF BainesHOF is offline
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I had a great time this year.
Moncada and Eloy were very iffy about signing outside of their sessions.
Kinda crappy as "new" guys IMO.
I take issue with them being labeled "crappy" for not signing outside of an official signing session. They each signed hundreds of autographs during their sessions at SoxFest. While I don't blame fans for trying to get them outside those official sessions, how much is enough? Players were hounded in the hotel starting Thursday morning and it never stopped. Not in the morning in the lobby. Not anywhere they went on the SoxFest floor. Not at night in the lobby. Not outside the hotel. I know it's a fan fest and the hounding should be viewed a little differently because of that, but the autograph requests of players is relentless, often by the same people. It just never stops. That's why some players start looking at people suspiciously. That's why Matt Davidson sidepanels me in an official session even though the ball is worth more than his autograph. Yes, some people are just flat-out jerks (see Steve Stone), but some fans have to give players a little breathing room sometimes.

I remember one SoxFest when Adam Dunn was leaving his just-completed signing session and a kid about 12 asked him if he could sign "just one." "It's never 'just one,'" Dunn said matter-of-factly as he stopped and signed for the kid and then some others who descended upon him.
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  #36  
Old 01-30-2018, 12:51 PM
beasly213 beasly213 is offline
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Awesome recap BainesHOF!

I haven't been to Soxfest in years (Probably since 2001 or 2002) back then general admission was $15
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  #37  
Old 01-30-2018, 06:05 PM
Harry Chappas Harry Chappas is offline
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I'm not an autograph collector so I've never heard of this term - side-paneled. How does it ruin the baseball? Is it possible that Davidson didn't know either? If someone handed me a baseball to autograph, I'd probably sign on a side panel just because it's got the most room. It's got to be a pain to try to sign in between the laces in the "sweet spot."
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  #38  
Old 01-30-2018, 06:46 PM
ricker182 ricker182 is offline
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I take issue with them being labeled "crappy" for not signing outside of an official signing session. They each signed hundreds of autographs during their sessions at SoxFest. While I don't blame fans for trying to get them outside those official sessions, how much is enough? Players were hounded in the hotel starting Thursday morning and it never stopped. Not in the morning in the lobby. Not anywhere they went on the SoxFest floor. Not at night in the lobby. Not outside the hotel. I know it's a fan fest and the hounding should be viewed a little differently because of that, but the autograph requests of players is relentless, often by the same people. It just never stops. That's why some players start looking at people suspiciously. That's why Matt Davidson sidepanels me in an official session even though the ball is worth more than his autograph. Yes, some people are just flat-out jerks (see Steve Stone), but some fans have to give players a little breathing room sometimes.

I remember one SoxFest when Adam Dunn was leaving his just-completed signing session and a kid about 12 asked him if he could sign "just one." "It's never 'just one,'" Dunn said matter-of-factly as he stopped and signed for the kid and then some others who descended upon him.
I would agree if it were any other weekend of the year, but they're specifically there to sign autographs and take pictures with fans.

It didn't help that Eloy and Moncada were two of the most sought after autographs. They were out of wristbands right when it opened.

Many many other players take no issue with signing outside of their sessions.
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  #39  
Old 01-30-2018, 07:18 PM
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I'm not an autograph collector so I've never heard of this term - side-paneled. How does it ruin the baseball? Is it possible that Davidson didn't know either? If someone handed me a baseball to autograph, I'd probably sign on a side panel just because it's got the most room. It's got to be a pain to try to sign in between the laces in the "sweet spot."
There is no way he doesn't know at this point in his career.

IMO I think he feels he isn't popular enough to be the only autograph on a single ball (official balls are $25 with a cube), so he signs it so you have room for others.

Also, I don't understand how that ruins the ball.
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Old 02-01-2018, 11:04 AM
Harry Chappas Harry Chappas is offline
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There is no way he doesn't know at this point in his career.

IMO I think he feels he isn't popular enough to be the only autograph on a single ball (official balls are $25 with a cube), so he signs it so you have room for others.

Also, I don't understand how that ruins the ball.
I had the same thought as well re: other signatures. I'm guessing that most non-autograph folks probably had a single ball and collected as many signatures as they could fit. I think Baines even mentioned that the ball was worth more than Davidson's signature irrespective of where he signed it.
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  #41  
Old 02-04-2018, 11:05 PM
soxfanreggie soxfanreggie is offline
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There is no way he doesn't know at this point in his career.

IMO I think he feels he isn't popular enough to be the only autograph on a single ball (official balls are $25 with a cube), so he signs it so you have room for others.

Also, I don't understand how that ruins the ball.
Could BainesHOF have asked him to sign on the sweet spot since it’s for “Favorite Sox Player” collection?
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  #42  
Old 02-05-2018, 05:59 PM
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Could BainesHOF have asked him to sign on the sweet spot since it’s for “Favorite Sox Player” collection?
Of course. When that's what I want, I ask for it.

I guarantee Davidson doesn't believe people would want only his autograph on a ball.
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