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  #16  
Old 07-12-2018, 11:29 AM
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voodoochile voodoochile is offline
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Originally Posted by bridgeportcopper View Post
I also really miss the refrain from "runaround Sue". Just things I remember from my youth that probably should have remained White Sox traditions, but I think we sold our organization's collective soul to Chance the Rapper a few years ago, in a rather misguided move. It hasnt really paid off and Ive seen Chance photographed in Cubs headgear, so "Channy from 79th" isnt very loyal to the south side.
I understand your point, but if you want to keep the next generation of fans coming you cannot rely on 50+ year old songs to keep them excited.

Times change. Music tastes change. People want the music to reflect their tastes. I'm sure there were people upset when we introduced canned music to the stadium and stopped relying on just organ music to create ambiance and excitement.

If you want your kids' kids to be watching baseball, you need to allow for the music to change to appeal to the newer tastes. That's just basic marketing...
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  #17  
Old 07-12-2018, 11:59 AM
WhiteSox5187 WhiteSox5187 is offline
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Originally Posted by voodoochile View Post
I understand your point, but if you want to keep the next generation of fans coming you cannot rely on 50+ year old songs to keep them excited.

Times change. Music tastes change. People want the music to reflect their tastes. I'm sure there were people upset when we introduced canned music to the stadium and stopped relying on just organ music to create ambiance and excitement.

If you want your kids' kids to be watching baseball, you need to allow for the music to change to appeal to the newer tastes. That's just basic marketing...
I think it's somewhere in the middle though. Things change constantly and a business needs to keep up with those changes but a part of the appeal of sports (and baseball in particular) is its timelessness.

Some teams, like the Red Sox with Sweet Caroline, do seem to cherish those "traditions" a lot more than the White Sox do.
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  #18  
Old 07-12-2018, 12:25 PM
Whitesox029 Whitesox029 is offline
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Originally Posted by thomas35forever View Post
Guys, I like Na Na, Hey Hey, Goodbye as much as the next Sox fan, but y'all need to chill. It's quite possible the song is resonating with fewer people coming to games and thus, they didn't feel they had to emphasize it as much with Nancy gone.

On top of that, newer fans need their own traditions to latch onto. Nowadays, more people see to hate that Thunderstruck isn't played at the start of games so much anymore.

This thread is one more example of why people pile onto baseball purists for not wanting anything to change ever. Not all change is good, but to never want the game or game-day experience to evolve is just silly. If baseball was really true to what it once was, everything would be exactly as how it was in the mid-19th century, and I don't think the game would have survived that way.

The below video shows exactly how some of you are sounding:

This is a pretty specious argument. Why should the Sox or MLB be so dismissive of the idea of keeping traditions when so many other things in society adhere very strongly to tradition? For example, when was the last time you heard someone suggest that we should stop singing Christmas songs like Jingle Bells or O Holy Night in favor of more "hip" Christmas tunes? When was the last time you heard someone suggest that a college football team should get rid of their marching band and replace it with an on-field DJ "to appeal to the kids"? That would be kind of an insane suggestion, no? Smacking of change for the sake of change? Despite the fact that the casual college football fan doesn't actually listen to marching band music in their free time unless they're a marching band person.

What is it about new MLB fans that causes them to "need their own traditions to latch onto", and why doesn't that logic apply to other realms?

Answer: Because it doesn't apply to new MLB fans either. MLB fanhood, like any other kind of thing that people enjoy in their leisure time, is very strongly tied to family. From a marketing standpoint, there should be an extremely compelling reason to keep things like musical traditions the same so that a parent can look at their kid and say "this is how we Sox fans celebrate, like we have for many decades". This is not Major League Lacrosse, a league that is trying to build a base. Baseball and MLB have completely saturated the American consciousness for a full century at this point. Anyone who is going to become a new Sox fan at this point is going to become a fan because someone close to them is going to introduce them to it. Not because they like the music that gets played at the park.
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  #19  
Old 07-12-2018, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Whitesox029 View Post
This is a pretty specious argument. Why should the Sox or MLB be so dismissive of the idea of keeping traditions when so many other things in society adhere very strongly to tradition? For example, when was the last time you heard someone suggest that we should stop singing Christmas songs like Jingle Bells or O Holy Night in favor of more "hip" Christmas tunes? When was the last time you heard someone suggest that a college football team should get rid of their marching band and replace it with an on-field DJ "to appeal to the kids"? That would be kind of an insane suggestion, no? Smacking of change for the sake of change? Despite the fact that the casual college football fan doesn't actually listen to marching band music in their free time unless they're a marching band person.

What is it about new MLB fans that causes them to "need their own traditions to latch onto", and why doesn't that logic apply to other realms?

Answer: Because it doesn't apply to new MLB fans either. MLB fanhood, like any other kind of thing that people enjoy in their leisure time, is very strongly tied to family. From a marketing standpoint, there should be an extremely compelling reason to keep things like musical traditions the same so that a parent can look at their kid and say "this is how we Sox fans celebrate, like we have for many decades". This is not Major League Lacrosse, a league that is trying to build a base. Baseball and MLB have completely saturated the American consciousness for a full century at this point. Anyone who is going to become a new Sox fan at this point is going to become a fan because someone close to them is going to introduce them to it. Not because they like the music that gets played at the park.

I agree with much of this. What I don't agree with is the general premise that the "Na Na Na Hey, Hey" song is no longer played at our ballpark. It is. I don't believe it was ever played following every Sox HR or after the last out after each home victory(as is suggested throughout this thread). It was normally played when the Sox knocked an opposing pitcher out of the game and was played as the pitcher was walking off the mound to the visitor's dugout (an event which sometimes followed a Sox HR). It also was played by the organist. The Sox no longer have an organist playing at every home game (only on weekends and special days).


The song is still being played; it's not played after every Sox HR or home victory (never was) and is being played less frequently likely because there is not an organist at each game and the Sox have been pretty dreadful the last two seasons and haven't been knocking as many pitchers out of games as they once did.


So all of you lamenting the loss of this song, just calm the **** down.
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  #20  
Old 07-12-2018, 09:12 PM
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Chaz, it was played enough after those moments, I would say 90 pct. I know when the mid 2000s hit, the Go Go White Sox song started to take over and Na Na was played less. So I know this isn't a recent thing. We're just a generic experience when it comes to music at the ballpark. Every ballpark has its own visual personally. In my opinion every ballpark should have it's own audial personality. We had it and pissed on it.
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  #21  
Old 07-12-2018, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Chez View Post
I agree with much of this. What I don't agree with is the general premise that the "Na Na Na Hey, Hey" song is no longer played at our ballpark. It is. I don't believe it was ever played following every Sox HR or after the last out after each home victory(as is suggested throughout this thread). It was normally played when the Sox knocked an opposing pitcher out of the game and was played as the pitcher was walking off the mound to the visitor's dugout (an event which sometimes followed a Sox HR).

That's my recollection as well. With as many home runs that the South Side Hitmen blasted, and as many starters and relievers they knocked out of the game, it must have seemed like it was played an awful lot.



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Originally Posted by Chez View Post
The song is still being played; it's not played after every Sox HR or home victory (never was) and is being played less frequently likely because there is not an organist at each game and the Sox have been pretty dreadful the last two seasons and haven't been knocking as many pitchers out of games as they once did.

The only disagreement I have with that is that I think the organist is there every game. I've been to eight Sox home games this year and the organ has been played at each and every one. Take Me Out To The Ball Game was played live, not with canned music. I can't have been to every special game this season, can I?
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  #22  
Old 07-13-2018, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by soxnut67 View Post
Chaz, it was played enough after those moments, I would say 90 pct. I know when the mid 2000s hit, the Go Go White Sox song started to take over and Na Na was played less. So I know this isn't a recent thing. We're just a generic experience when it comes to music at the ballpark. Every ballpark has its own visual personally. In my opinion every ballpark should have it's own audial personality. We had it and pissed on it.


I completely agree with the bolded part of your post. I also remember a number of years ago posters on this board were complaining that "The Song" was being played too often. I recall at the time that it was played whenever the opposition made an in-inning pitching change regardless of the circumstances of the change. For example if the opposition was changing pitchers because of a lefty/righty match-up the song would be played even if the pitcher being pulled had pitched well. The song was being played if the visiting starter pitched into the eighth inning and was pulled with a ten run lead. IMO, those were legit points -- "The Song" was often being played at inappropriate times during a game.


It's a great song that when played at the right time brings back a flood of great memories to many of us.
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  #23  
Old 07-13-2018, 08:07 AM
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The only disagreement I have with that is that I think the organist is there every game. I've been to eight Sox home games this year and the organ has been played at each and every one. Take Me Out To The Ball Game was played live, not with canned music. I can't have been to every special game this season, can I?

FJ, every game you go to is a special game.
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  #24  
Old 07-13-2018, 09:51 AM
soxnut67 soxnut67 is offline
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Originally Posted by Chez View Post
I completely agree with the bolded part of your post. I also remember a number of years ago posters on this board were complaining that "The Song" was being played too often. I recall at the time that it was played whenever the opposition made an in-inning pitching change regardless of the circumstances of the change. For example if the opposition was changing pitchers because of a lefty/righty match-up the song would be played even if the pitcher being pulled had pitched well. The song was being played if the visiting starter pitched into the eighth inning and was pulled with a ten run lead. IMO, those were legit points -- "The Song" was often being played at inappropriate times during a game.


It's a great song that when played at the right time brings back a flood of great memories to many of us.
Yes, you're right on it being played at inappropriate times. I remember that as well. As to how it wasn't being used with common sense, I don't get. But the nerd about these things that I am, I went on youtube and it was being used for home runs up until 2014 at least. There were years in between with them using the Yahoo phrase either after The Song, or just Yahoooo.

I just want it to go back to appropriate moments, to know that when this happens, you're going to hear it, and you know that you are on the South Side!

I don't want flavor of the month songs for those moments. To me that's for walk-up music, and other in game situations. That's where they can reflect on their moment in time.
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  #25  
Old 07-16-2018, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian26 View Post
Iím actually stunned at the reactions here as if this just happened this year. The Steam song hasnít been used after a homer or after the end of a game in at least 15 years, if not longer. Might be closer to 20 years. It was phased out years ago... well before the 2005 season.
No, I specifically remember much more recent than that. As another poster here said, 2014.

I don't mind nothing after HRs and routine pitching changes. Just please, bring it back for victories. The NYY will never get rid of Sinatra. Flubs will stick to their song. Dodgers still have I Love LA.

Listen to how perfect this is:

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  #26  
Old 07-17-2018, 09:35 AM
Whitesox029 Whitesox029 is offline
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Originally Posted by Chez View Post
I agree with much of this. What I don't agree with is the general premise that the "Na Na Na Hey, Hey" song is no longer played at our ballpark. It is. I don't believe it was ever played following every Sox HR or after the last out after each home victory(as is suggested throughout this thread). It was normally played when the Sox knocked an opposing pitcher out of the game and was played as the pitcher was walking off the mound to the visitor's dugout (an event which sometimes followed a Sox HR). It also was played by the organist. The Sox no longer have an organist playing at every home game (only on weekends and special days).


The song is still being played; it's not played after every Sox HR or home victory (never was) and is being played less frequently likely because there is not an organist at each game and the Sox have been pretty dreadful the last two seasons and haven't been knocking as many pitchers out of games as they once did.


So all of you lamenting the loss of this song, just calm the **** down.
Point of order: I was more referring to "Sweet Home Chicago" at the end of a win than "Na Na Hey Hey..." The former song was totally retired for a while. It's been brought back, but it isn't the first thing immediately played after a win like I always remember from my childhood in the 90s. They play some other song I've never even recognized (does anyone?) first.
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Originally Posted by Brian26 View Post
Iím actually stunned at the reactions here as if this just happened this year. The Steam song hasnít been used after a homer or after the end of a game in at least 15 years, if not longer. Might be closer to 20 years. It was phased out years ago... well before the 2005 season.
As for "Na Na Hey Hey..."
Alexei Ramirez's Slam vs. Detroit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n-lM9MkOfA
Thome in the Blackout Game
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIwG--tGJK8
The song is played after both these HRs, so the idea that it hasn't been played in 15 or 20 years isn't true. It is still played for mid-inning pitching changes after the Sox have really roughed up a pitcher...that just happens to be a rare occurrence these days.

And re: organist-- the new organist plays at every home game and has done so since she took over for Nancy in 2011. The weekends and day games thing was Nancy easing into retirement the same way Hawk is doing this year.
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  #27  
Old 07-17-2018, 09:41 AM
Whitesox029 Whitesox029 is offline
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Originally Posted by Chez View Post
I agree with much of this. What I don't agree with is the general premise that the "Na Na Na Hey, Hey" song is no longer played at our ballpark. It is. I don't believe it was ever played following every Sox HR or after the last out after each home victory(as is suggested throughout this thread). It was normally played when the Sox knocked an opposing pitcher out of the game and was played as the pitcher was walking off the mound to the visitor's dugout (an event which sometimes followed a Sox HR). It also was played by the organist. The Sox no longer have an organist playing at every home game (only on weekends and special days).


The song is still being played; it's not played after every Sox HR or home victory (never was) and is being played less frequently likely because there is not an organist at each game and the Sox have been pretty dreadful the last two seasons and haven't been knocking as many pitchers out of games as they once did.


So all of you lamenting the loss of this song, just calm the **** down.
Point of order: I was more referring to "Sweet Home Chicago" at the end of a win than "Na Na Hey Hey..." The former song was totally retired for a while. It's been brought back, but it isn't the first thing immediately played after a win like I always remember from my childhood in the 90s. They play some other song I've never even recognized (does anyone?) first.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian26 View Post
Iím actually stunned at the reactions here as if this just happened this year. The Steam song hasnít been used after a homer or after the end of a game in at least 15 years, if not longer. Might be closer to 20 years. It was phased out years ago... well before the 2005 season.
As for "Na Na Hey Hey..."
Alexei Ramirez's Slam vs. Detroit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n-lM9MkOfA
Thome in the Blackout Game
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIwG--tGJK8
The song is played after both these HRs, so the idea that it hasn't been played in 15 or 20 years isn't true. It is still played for mid-inning pitching changes after the Sox have really roughed up a pitcher...that just happens to be a rare occurrence these days.

And re: organist-- the new organist plays at every home game and has done so since she took over for Nancy in 2011. The weekends and day games thing was Nancy easing into retirement the same way Hawk is doing this year.

The reason people are reacting so strongly to all these things is that all these music cues were in full use in 2005, and everyone has very positive and powerful memories associated with that year. If the Sox are in first place in 2020, the best thing they could do to improve the ballpark experience would be to make the major-event music cues basically identical to 2005. That includes bringing back the old scoreboard intro video (would be magnificent on that nice new giant board). I realize they might have to pay to use Pirates of the Caribbean, but how much could it really cost? They used it for what felt like close to 10 years.
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