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  #166  
Old 01-28-2014, 09:52 PM
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ChiSoxGirl ChiSoxGirl is offline
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Originally Posted by Noneck View Post
Is that a back drop that was at Soxfest or did you photoshop that?
It was a backdrop they had at SoxFest.
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  #167  
Old 01-28-2014, 09:56 PM
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It was a backdrop they had at SoxFest.

Very cool, even the lighting looks like you were at the park.
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  #168  
Old 01-28-2014, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by MUsoxfan View Post
Why should they go out of their way to make sure people can flip their scribble for maximum cash? What do they get out of that?

Just because they made x amount of money playing baseball, doesn't mean they have to put money in a "collector's" pocket
This is a really ignorant comment and generalization.

Anyone who spends the time, money and effort to go to Soxfest or an autograph convention to get something signed generally would not make their money back by selling it second-hand. It's just not worth it. Consider the time involved in standing in line, the cost to go there, park, the tickets, buying the memorabilia, the fees to sell it on an auction site, the item not being certified, etc. The return would not justify the investment in most cases.

Most people collect this stuff to put in their den/tv room because it's a cool to display/fun to talk about. It's a hobby for a lot of people. If there wasn't a market for it, then these huge fan conventions like Soxfest, Cubs Convention, the Rosemont SunTimes shows wouldn't exist.
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  #169  
Old 01-28-2014, 10:17 PM
MUsoxfan MUsoxfan is offline
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This is a really ignorant comment and generalization.

Anyone who spends the time, money and effort to go to Soxfest or an autograph convention to get something signed generally would not make their money back by selling it second-hand. It's just not worth it. Consider the time involved in standing in line, the cost to go there, park, the tickets, buying the memorabilia, the fees to sell it on an auction site, the item not being certified, etc. The return would not justify the investment in most cases.

Most people collect this stuff to put in their den/tv room because it's a cool to display/fun to talk about. It's a hobby for a lot of people. If there wasn't a market for it, then these huge fan conventions like Soxfest, Cubs Convention, the Rosemont SunTimes shows wouldn't exist.

That's fine and I understand that aspect of it. What I was mostly responding to was the claim that players know what makes an autograph valuable. That, to me, suggests value on the open market. I don't see why a guy like Jim Thome would want to go out of his way to make it easy for a guy to make maximum cash on the back end.

If Thome signs something for someone to keep around the house, what does it matter how he signs it. Isn't just good enough to know that you met the guy and he signed something for you to display? Seems petty to complain about how he signed a baseball not on the sweet spot or that he didn't put other little details in the signature when there are hundreds of other people waiting and a limited timeframe in which to do it.
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  #170  
Old 01-28-2014, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by MUsoxfan View Post
That's fine and I understand that aspect of it. What I was mostly responding to was the claim that players know what makes an autograph valuable. That, to me, suggests value on the open market. I don't see why a guy like Jim Thome would want to go out of his way to make it easy for a guy to make maximum cash on the back end.

If Thome signs something for someone to keep around the house, what does it matter how he signs it. Isn't just good enough to know that you met the guy and he signed something for you to display? Seems petty to complain about how he signed a baseball not on the sweet spot or that he didn't put other little details in the signature when there are hundreds of other people waiting and a limited timeframe in which to do it.
I'm probably not going to change your mind on any of this, but I appreciate the discussion.

So, if you truly just collect this stuff to display in your den or tv room, you want it to look nice. The sweet spot on the ball is the longest part of the ball to put a full signature such that it is not squeezed. It displays nicely like that. If a guy puts his number next to his name, it looks more complete and helps you remember who's signature it is.

Let me show you a classic example of a "good" auto and a "bad" auto. AJ Pierzynski has always been cordial when I've seen him. He's signed some nice World Series stuff for me. However, I've seen him tank his autograph for some people.

Here's AJ's nice signature (you can basically read it...)


Here's AJ's crappy signature (just a scribble...)


That second one looks like something a pre-school kid would do with his crayons. AJ may have been in a bad mood when he did that But, yeah, tell me which one you would want to display at home and if you'd feel good about the experience if you got the 2nd version of the autograph after standing in line for an hour.
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  #171  
Old 01-28-2014, 11:28 PM
BainesHOF BainesHOF is offline
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Originally Posted by MUsoxfan View Post
Maybe they get frustrated with grown adults who fuss and moan about having them scribble things the "proper way". I'd be frustrated too.
Well, it's an autograph session at a team event. The retired players don't have to do it. They agreed to be there. From my perspective, asking a player politely to use a certain pen and sign it in a certain place takes all of two seconds. I don't think it's too much to ask after spending decent money and waiting a couple hours. Plus making a simple request often helps a player, who has a bunch of different pens and markers in front him and often hesitates when deciding which one to use and where to sign an item on his own.

Personally, I find it warped that multi-millionaires play games with fans in such a setting. There's no reason why a player should be frustrated by an autograph request at a fan fest.

As far as autograph values go, I agree with Brian26 that it's not worth attending a fan fest to make money. In fact, I think the issue is not whether the player is increasing the value of the item, but whether the player is decreasing the value or even wrecking an item. I guess a good example is Thome giving his jag signature on a $500 bat. How would you feel if you paid $500 for the bat and now, should you need the money, you'd be lucky to get $250 for the bat because of the bad signature? In effect, Thome just screwed the guy out of $250. Way to go, multi-millionaire! You really showed one of your fans!!!

As far as sweet-spotting baseballs, it's simply the standard because a signature looks best there. If you have other balls in your collection, it would be nice if they all looked similar when displayed. It's just a collecting thing. The same kind of reasoning why collectors want Star Wars figures in their original packaging or old currency in uncirculated condition.

Collecting autographs can be a weird thing, but I wouldn't criticize it here because so can spending time and money watching men play a game over 100 times in a year and then spending more time reading and writing about it on a message board.
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  #172  
Old 01-28-2014, 11:30 PM
Noneck Noneck is online now
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It doesnt matter if the autograph is for someone to display in their house or for a collector, the player agreed to sign and should do it in the best possible way. I also understand if a player cant do certain things such as "Big Hurt" due to contractual reasons but to do it in a way to lessen its value is shameful.
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  #173  
Old 01-29-2014, 09:13 AM
shenk16 shenk16 is offline
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Originally Posted by ChiSoxGirl View Post
It was a backdrop they had at SoxFest.
Did I miss the annual ChiSoxGirl review of SoxFest?
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  #174  
Old 01-29-2014, 09:29 AM
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For me, I collect a lot of autographs and memorabilia. If you collect it, you want it nice. If you collect stamps or coins, you pay more for higher grades. If you collect plates, you donít buy ones that are chipped. If you collect comic books, you donít want the edition a 7 year old colored all over. It is no different.

When it comes to signing stuff, know who you are. I say that because I get why Buehrle may not sign Perfect Game, or Thomas and Maddux donít sign HOF. But Like, Steve Stone for example is notoriously a jerk to fans at signings. No Cy Young, No Sweet Spot, everything MUST be inscribed. You would not get back the 20 buck cost of an MLB Baseball if you sold a sweet spot cy young Steve Stone ball. Get over yourself.

I never am ungrateful for a player signing, but I do get why people get upset. Soxfest one year, Freddy Garcia showed up totally drunk and hungover, and this guy had been working on a World Series team signed ball, and Freddy Signed it upside down, so his signature is the only 1 going in the other direction.
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  #175  
Old 01-29-2014, 09:40 AM
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Did I miss the annual ChiSoxGirl review of SoxFest?
No, I've just been busy and exhausted since the event. Maybe I'll have a chance to do a recap tonight.
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  #176  
Old 01-29-2014, 09:46 AM
shenk16 shenk16 is offline
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Originally Posted by Domeshot17 View Post
For me, I collect a lot of autographs and memorabilia. If you collect it, you want it nice. If you collect stamps or coins, you pay more for higher grades. If you collect plates, you donít buy ones that are chipped. If you collect comic books, you donít want the edition a 7 year old colored all over. It is no different.

When it comes to signing stuff, know who you are. I say that because I get why Buehrle may not sign Perfect Game, or Thomas and Maddux donít sign HOF. But Like, Steve Stone for example is notoriously a jerk to fans at signings. No Cy Young, No Sweet Spot, everything MUST be inscribed. You would not get back the 20 buck cost of an MLB Baseball if you sold a sweet spot cy young Steve Stone ball. Get over yourself.

I never am ungrateful for a player signing, but I do get why people get upset. Soxfest one year, Freddy Garcia showed up totally drunk and hungover, and this guy had been working on a World Series team signed ball, and Freddy Signed it upside down, so his signature is the only 1 going in the other direction.
I agree 100%.

The annual Steve Stone is an idiot story of Soxfest 2014:
Literally printed his name out on some guy's baseball instead of signing it.

I apologize if this question was already posed, but how does Soxfest work in terms of players attending? I was under the impression that current players were required to attend so many team functions per year. I assume that everything is compensated for them. Does the team actually pay former players or do they just take care of their accommodations? In my opinion none of this should matter, but I always find it interesting why some guys attend and others do not.

Rumor was that Sale was on a cruise with his parents. Understandable. Is there a reason that a guy like Rios never attended once? Possibly something to do with his VISA?
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  #177  
Old 01-29-2014, 09:58 AM
LoveYourSuit LoveYourSuit is offline
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Originally Posted by BainesHOF View Post
Well, it's an autograph session at a team event. The retired players don't have to do it. They agreed to be there. From my perspective, asking a player politely to use a certain pen and sign it in a certain place takes all of two seconds. I don't think it's too much to ask after spending decent money and waiting a couple hours. Plus making a simple request often helps a player, who has a bunch of different pens and markers in front him and often hesitates when deciding which one to use and where to sign an item on his own.

Personally, I find it warped that multi-millionaires play games with fans in such a setting. There's no reason why a player should be frustrated by an autograph request at a fan fest.

As far as autograph values go, I agree with Brian26 that it's not worth attending a fan fest to make money. In fact, I think the issue is not whether the player is increasing the value of the item, but whether the player is decreasing the value or even wrecking an item. I guess a good example is Thome giving his jag signature on a $500 bat. How would you feel if you paid $500 for the bat and now, should you need the money, you'd be lucky to get $250 for the bat because of the bad signature? In effect, Thome just screwed the guy out of $250. Way to go, multi-millionaire! You really showed one of your fans!!!

As far as sweet-spotting baseballs, it's simply the standard because a signature looks best there. If you have other balls in your collection, it would be nice if they all looked similar when displayed. It's just a collecting thing. The same kind of reasoning why collectors want Star Wars figures in their original packaging or old currency in uncirculated condition.

Collecting autographs can be a weird thing, but I wouldn't criticize it here because so can spending time and money watching men play a game over 100 times in a year and then spending more time reading and writing about it on a message board.
I'm pretty sure Jim Thome did not wake up that AM with the simple mission in mind to screw over people with a ****ed up signature on a piece of memorabilia.

Still don't understand how the math works in him screwing that one guy $250.
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  #178  
Old 01-29-2014, 09:59 AM
dickallen15 dickallen15 is offline
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Another thing to keep in mind, when you are signing hundreds of autographs, your signature tends to deteriorate after time. Go through something where you have to sign several things quickly. After a while, your signature gets a little scribly.
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  #179  
Old 01-29-2014, 10:06 AM
LoveYourSuit LoveYourSuit is offline
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Another thing to keep in mind, when you are signing hundreds of autographs, your signature tends to deteriorate after time. Go through something where you have to sign several things quickly. After a while, your signature gets a little scribly.
When you make millions and millions of $ you are not allowed to be human.
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  #180  
Old 01-29-2014, 10:15 AM
dickallen15 dickallen15 is offline
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I'm pretty sure Jim Thome did not wake up that AM with the simple mission in mind to screw over people with a ****ed up signature on a piece of memorabilia.

Still don't understand how the math works in him screwing that one guy $250.
Neither do I. He did sign it. If it wasn't to make money and only display he was out the $500 anyway.

The same complaints are said for years, so really, if you want someone to sign really neatly, if you want someone to add their number or HOF or Perfect Game or Cy Young, or sign on the sweet spot, do yourself a favor and skip Soxfest signings next year, or you will be saying the same thing. You can blame the players, but autographs have become big business. Frank, Bo, Thome, I am all sure have contractual obligations when it comes to signing. Whether you have any intention or not of selling it, the guy signing it probably and understandaby thinks you do. There are more people looking to make money in those autograph lines than are not. Even some collectors who say they are for personal display will look for a profit in a few years.
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