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  #46  
Old 07-21-2012, 10:27 PM
My_Sox_Summer My_Sox_Summer is offline
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I am currently in the Air Force, stationed at Luke AFB. All in all, the lifestyle is very enjoyable. But one very real sacrifice is being away from home, friends, and family. Following the White Sox through DirectTV's MLB package and projects like this keep me connected to home and those friends and family that also follow the White Sox.
Very cool. I love the Flying Sox logo.

I was out west (AZ for 3 years and Cali for 7) and the one thing that connected me with my family and friends back in IL and then later CA, was Illini basketball. Always made calls at half and talked to my dad and friend, and texted during the game with several folks. It was a good way to keep home alive in my new environment.
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  #47  
Old 07-22-2012, 11:17 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Edit: Sorry mods; pics reduced to the size of the previous posts.


Danny Cater broke into the big leagues in 1964 with the Phillies but got his first chance as a regular starter after being traded to the White Sox with Lee Elia after the ’64 season for Ray Herbert and Jeoff Long. Cater would spend only the ’65 season and the first couple months of the ’66 season before being traded to the Athletics for Wayne Causey. Cater had some of his most productive seasons with the Athletics in Kansas City and Oakland. In 1968 he batted .290, good for second in the American League behind Carl Yastrzemski’s .301 (the lowest batting average ever to win a title). The next spring, Cater was featured in a Sports Illustrated article as “one of the game’s best unknown players,” and in 1970 after being traded to the Yankees had arguably his best season, batting .301 with 76 RBI and 64 runs scored for the second place club. His playing time steadily declined over the next five seasons, which he spent with the Yankees, Red Sox, and Cardinals.

Cater’s started 119 games for the 1965 White Sox, 109 in left field, 8 at third base, and 2 at first base. He occupied the leadoff spot, even though his batting average at that spot was lower than any other spot in the lineup. His .270 average on the season was very respectable, and his 74 runs scored was second only behind Don Buford. His 14 home runs were tied for third on the team with Floyd Robinson, and was also a career high for Cater, who would only hit 51 more in his remaining 10 seasons as a big-league ballplayer. Cater started off the season exceptionally strong, batting .328 with 17 RBI and 21 runs scored in the team’s first 32 games (during which the Sox went 23-9). The Sox’ decision to trade him after he got off to a slow start in 1966 turned out to be a poor one; Cater would go on to have five consecutive productive seasons in the big leagues, while Causey was never a regular starter for the White Sox and never batted over .250 after being traded for Cater.

During his one full season with the White Sox, Cater had a knack for clutch situations, batting .327 with two outs and runners in scoring position and .319 when the game was late and close (7th inning or later, with the game tied, the Sox ahead by one, or with the tying run at least on deck). Perhaps one of Cater’s ultimate late and close heroics came on June 4th, 1965. The White Sox had gone only 5-8 since the 13-run affair against the Athletics on May 17th, and had slipped to 1.5 games behind the Twins coming into their Friday evening matchup at Yankee Stadium. Joel Horlen started for the White Sox and Bill Stafford for the Yankees. Both starting pitchers scattered six hits but gave up no runs, and the game went into extras. Eddie Fisher took the mound for the Sox in the 10th and the Yankees used three relievers to get the game to the 15th, still tied at 0. Cater, batting leadoff, was 0-6 with three strikeouts when he came to the plate with one out and nobody on in the top of the 15th. Facing Pete Mikkelsen, Cater smashed his 5th home run of the season, putting the Sox ahead 1-0. Robinson would add another solo home run later in the inning, and the Sox won the game 2-0 to remain 1.5 games behind the Twins. Eddie Fisher’s six innings pitched, giving up only one hit, was his longest outing of the season and earned him a well-deserved fifth win of the season to add to his 11 saves.

A young White Sox fan in 1965 looking at Cater’s card might have seized on his minor league performances in 1959 and 1961, years when he hit above .300 and scored more than 100 runs. Cater would never score more runs than the 74 he scored for the 1965 White Sox, but he did go on to have a productive major league career.

Last edited by BRDSR; 07-24-2012 at 08:56 AM.
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  #48  
Old 07-23-2012, 06:54 AM
soxfan1965 soxfan1965 is offline
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I felt deflated after the Sox traded Cater for Causey, moreso when Causey didn't work out so well. Cater had an unusual batting stance, standing upright, hands low, with feet close together, hard to believe he could get off an efficient swing. But for me, Cater was a likable player you liked having on your team. When Robinson came up, you felt confident that he would make something happen, though by 1965 he was starting his decline from 1964. Except for the home runs, I didn't think he was that far down from Billy Williams. Too bad Robinson didn't make the All Star game or the post season. It would be nice if the Sox could bring him back for a visit some time, if possible. Speaking of 1964, I noticed that Mike Hershberger died earlier this month. It may be on this site, but I didn't see it posted.
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  #49  
Old 07-23-2012, 11:01 PM
gaelhound gaelhound is offline
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Originally Posted by soxfan1965 View Post
I felt deflated after the Sox traded Cater for Causey, moreso when Causey didn't work out so well. Cater had an unusual batting stance, standing upright, hands low, with feet close together, hard to believe he could get off an efficient swing. But for me, Cater was a likable player you liked having on your team. When Robinson came up, you felt confident that he would make something happen, though by 1965 he was starting his decline from 1964. Except for the home runs, I didn't think he was that far down from Billy Williams. Too bad Robinson didn't make the All Star game or the post season. It would be nice if the Sox could bring him back for a visit some time, if possible. Speaking of 1964, I noticed that Mike Hershberger died earlier this month. It may be on this site, but I didn't see it posted.
This is about the earliest team i really remember. I fondly recall my Father singing "Danny Boy" When this guy came up to bat. My father invented walk up music but gets no credit
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  #50  
Old 07-24-2012, 08:26 AM
Golden Sox Golden Sox is offline
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Default Danny Cater

When Cater was traded for Wayne Causey it turned out to be a bad trade for the White Sox. The trade was made because White Sox manager Eddie Stanky didn't like Cater. Needless to say the trade didn't work out for the White Sox.
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  #51  
Old 08-28-2012, 07:00 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Default Joe Horlen

Had a brief hiatus, but here's the next installment:





The story of Joe Horlen, often known as Joel, is perhaps most about why he isn’t much of a story. He’s not really a part of baseball lore, or even an immediately recognizable name for many White Sox fans. Yet he is one of only six pitchers to start at least 15 games in ten consecutive years for the 112-year-old franchise, from 1962-71. The others are Doc White (ten seasons, 1903-12), Red Faber (13 seasons, 1919-31), Ted Lyons (11 seasons, 1932-42), Billy Pierce (13 seasons, 1949-61), and Mark Buerhle (11 seasons, 2001-2011).

Why isn’t Horlen a bigger part of White Sox history? For one thing, Horlen didn’t win all that many games. His 113 wins are good for 9th on the White Sox all-time list, but he also lost 113 games for the team. The numbers are a little mind-boggling by modern standards. Over the course of his career he posted a 3.11 ERA and finished one game under .500 (he went 3-4 for the Athletics in 1972, the only season he pitched for a team other than the White Sox). For five straight seasons (1964-68) he posted sub-3.00 ERAs, yet only won more than 13 games once (19, in 1967).

Horlen’s won-loss record earned him a nickname of Joe “Hard Luck” Horlen, and there is actually empirical data that would arguably make him unluckiest pitcher ever to play the game. Horlen’s career ERA places him at 92nd on the all-time list for pitches who pitched more than 2,000 innings. Of the 91 players above him on the list, only 8 had non-winning records (one, Nap Rucker, had an even mark at 134-134). Of those 8 pitchers, each one pitched exclusively in the dead-ball era. The careers of five started before 1900 and the last, Bob Groom’s, ended in 1918. Thus, no pitcher since the end of World War I has pitched as effectively as Joe Horlen and still lost more games than he won.

The 1965 season was the first season that Horlen was used exclusively as a starter, and he was up to the task, although it was one of the seasons that earned him his nickname. He led the team’s starters with a 2.88 ERA, seven complete games, four shutouts, 219 IP, and a 3.21 K/BB ratio. Despite his dominance, he finished with an even 13-13 mark on a team that ended the season well above .500. Only Gary Peters, who finished the season with a 3.62 ERA (the highest of any White Sox starter) had a worse win-loss record.

Although not his most dominant pitching performance of the season, Horlen’s overall performance on June 8th may have been his best of the season. Facing the Red Sox on the road, Horlen gave up two early runs, in the second and third innings, on a home run by Lee Thomas and then a sacrifice fly. The Sox tied the game in the fifth and (since this was before the designated hitter was adopted in 1973) Horlen came up to bat in the sixth with Ron Hansen on third, J.C. Martin on first, and two outs. Horlen singled, his second of three singles that day, driving in the go-ahead run. When Horlen took the mound in the bottom of the sixth, he proceeded to retire the next 12 Red Sox batters in order, finishing his complete game and securing the victory to stay 2.5 games behind the Twins.

A child looking at Horlen’s 1965 baseball card would have noticed the 1.88 ERA he posted the year earlier. Although out-done in 1964 by Dean Chance’s 1.65 ERA and Sandy Koufax's 1.74 ERA, Horlen’s mark that year would have led the Major Leagues in each of the previous 18 seasons. By any measure Horlen probably did turn out to be one of the 10 best pitchers in White Sox history, but a child in 1965 might have seen even a much greater potential.

Last edited by BRDSR; 08-28-2012 at 10:03 PM.
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  #52  
Old 08-28-2012, 08:56 PM
SI1020 SI1020 is offline
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Horlen was the best pitcher in the AL in the ill fated year of 1967, but Jim Lonborg won the Cy Young award.
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  #53  
Old 08-28-2012, 09:00 PM
LITTLE NELL LITTLE NELL is offline
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Horlen was the best pitcher in the AL in the ill fated year of 1967, but Jim Lonborg won the Cy Young award.
If the Sox had won the Pennant, Horlen would have won the Cy Young.

After he pitched that no-hitter I thought we would go all the way.
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Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 08-29-2012 at 06:25 AM.
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  #54  
Old 08-29-2012, 08:44 AM
Procol Harum Procol Harum is offline
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Joe Horlen was a great pitcher for the White Sox. If he would have been on, say, the Cardinals during that stretch from '63 through ''69 he undoubtedly would've registered 3-4 20-win seasons.
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  #55  
Old 09-01-2012, 10:03 AM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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After pitching at the University of Oklahoma, Eddie Fisher was signed by the San Francisco Giants before the 1958 season. He spent all of 1958 in the minors and, although he would see some time in the majors in 1959, 1960, and 1961, he wouldn’t spend an entire season on a big league roster until the Giants traded him to the White Sox in the deal that ended Billy Pierce’s playing days in Chicago. Over the course of 15 seasons in the big leagues, Fisher would play for six different teams, but more for the White Sox than any other team. He started a significant number of games in 1962, 1963, and 1973, but otherwise was used primarily as a reliever. He compiled an 85-70 record during his career, a 3.41 ERA, and 81 saves.

By far Fisher’s most impressive season was his 1965 campaign for the White Sox. Teams generally did not have a defined “closer” in that era; rather, the team’s best reliever was often called a fireman. A fireman would enter a game to protect a lead or close deficit and would usually pitch multiple innings, sometimes 3 or more. Fisher was a White Sox fireman in 1965. His 82 appearances and 60 games finished were both league highs, as was his .974 WHIP. Despite never starting a game, he amassed 15 wins, usually by coming in during the middle of the game. Many of Fisher’s 24 saves during the 1965 season were two- or three-inning efforts. Fisher was especially effective during the first half of the season. Through July 7th, he boasted a 1.21 ERA, 19 saves, and a 9-3 record. He finished the season with a 2.40 ERA and Hoyt Wilhelm took over as the team’s primary fireman, but his incredible season still earned him a spot on the All-Star team and 4th place in MVP voting, the highest a White Sox player had finished since Minnie Minoso also finished 4th in 1960. (White Sox players Nellie Fox, Luis Aparicio, and Early Wynn had finished 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, respectively, in 1959.) The Sporting News awarded Fisher its annual Fireman of the Year award.

June 11th, 1965, was an incredibly accurate microcosm of Fisher’s season. The day featured a double header against the Senators in Washington, D.C. Juan Pizarro started the first game, and through five innings had only given up one run, with the White Sox leading 3-1. After giving up a single to the first batter in the 6th, Al Lopez decided to take Pizarro out and put in Fisher. Fisher finished the game, giving up 3 hits and one unearned run resulting from a passed ball by backup catcher J.C. Martin. In the nightcap, after his dissatisfaction with five different pitchers through seven innings, Lopez again put in Fisher, this time with the White Sox losing 4-3. Fisher pitched a scoreless 8th, allowing only a harmless single with two outs. The White Sox tied the game on a lead-off home run by J.C. Martin in the top of the 9th, and Fisher pitched another scoreless inning in the bottom half of the inning. In the top of the 10th, Don Buford hit another lead-off home run, putting the Sox in front, and Fisher closed out the game with a perfect 10th inning. By the end of the day, Fisher had pitched seven innings, given up 5 hits and zero earned runs, and earned himself a four-inning save and a three-inning win. The Twins, who also swept a double header against the Tigers, remained 1.5 games ahead of the White Sox.

An undiscerning youngster looking at Fisher’s 1965 baseball card might have been incredibly impressed by his .302 ERA the year before. This, of course, was a misprint, evidence of the hastiness often employed by Topps to get the set to print. Fisher’s ERA had actually been 3.02. Still, you can imagine a 7- or 8-year-old, just learning about statistics, running to his father and exclaiming what an incredible year Fisher had just had.
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  #56  
Old 09-01-2012, 01:22 PM
LITTLE NELL LITTLE NELL is offline
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Another pitcher in the long line of damn good hurlers from the Go-Go era of the 50s and 60s. Fisher was another great knuckleball pitcher that we had in those days along with Wilhelm and Wood who joined the Sox a few years later. We could use some of those guys right now.
I know it was a different era but the Sox from 1951 through 1968 never had a team ERA over 3.73 except for 1961 when it was 4.01, 1961 was an expansion year when pitching is sort of watered down.

Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 09-01-2012 at 01:34 PM.
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  #57  
Old 11-03-2012, 11:55 AM
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By 1965, Bill “Moose” Skowron had been a nine-year starter with the Yankees, played one season with the Dodgers, and had a short stint with the Senators before being traded (with Carl Bouldin) to the White Sox in July 1964 for Frank Kreutzer and Joe Cunningham. His career as a Yankee was somewhat overshadowed by the likes of Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, and Yogi Berra, but he was consistently productive for the Yankees, batting .294, hitting 165 home runs, and driving in 672 runs for the franchise. During his nine seasons with the Yankees, he helped the team to 7 World Series (and helped the Dodgers to another in 1963). He batted .293 with eight home runs and 29 RBI in 39 World Series games over the course of his career. On any other team, Skowron would have batted 3rd or 4th for the most productive seasons of his career instead of 5th or 6th; some believe that on a different team, he might have put up Hall-of-Fame-caliber numbers.

The 1965 season was Skowron’s first full season with the White Sox and his only truly productive one. He led a relatively low-scoring offense with 78 RBI and 237 total bases, and matched John Romano for most home runs with 18. His .274 batting overage was second only to Don Buford among starters. His performance earned him a spot on the All Star team with teammate Eddie Fisher. Although his production for White Sox was rather short-lived, he would become a beloved former player, working as a community relations representative for the team from 1999 until his death from lung cancer in April 2012.

Skowron’s importance to the 1965 squad was underscored on June 13th. Having lost to the Senators on the 12th, the White Sox started the day 1.5 games behind the Twins. Senators center-fielder Don Lock hit a solo home run off of Sox starter Bruce Howard in the bottom of the 2nd, and then the teams locked in a pitching duel for four innings. Still trailing 1-0 in the top of the 7th, Skowron came to the plate with one out and crushed a solo home run of his own off Senators starter Pete Richert, who was in the middle of one of the best seasons of his 13-year career. In the top of the 9th, Floyd Robinson led off the inning with a double, and after Danny Cater struck out, Skowron tripled the opposite way to drive in the eventual game-winning run. Hoyt Wilhelm, who pitched the last two scoreless innings, picked up his first win of the season. With the Twins losing to the Tigers, the White Sox pulled within a half game of the league lead.

A child looking at Skowron’s 1965 card might have wondered why he was nicknamed Moose. At 6’0” and 197 pounds, he was a muscular guy, but not particularly big. His face was large and narrowed at the jaw, so that could be it. But a really inquisitive child would have learned that as a kid, Skowron’s grandfather had thought he looked like Italian prime minister Benito Mussolini, that the nickname eventually got shortened to Moose, and that it obviously stuck for his entire baseball career.

Last edited by BRDSR; 11-03-2012 at 12:16 PM.
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  #58  
Old 11-10-2012, 04:56 PM
TheVulture TheVulture is offline
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Originally Posted by fisk4ever View Post
Paulie, being alive and all.
For some reason, this reminded me of story about Ty Cobb. As an old man, he was asked what he thought he would hit if he was playing in the modern game. He said, "Probably .290, .300." The interviewer asked if it was because of the advent of the slider, growing use of relievers, stronger pitchers. "No," he said, "because I'm seventy years old."
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  #59  
Old 11-10-2012, 05:03 PM
TheVulture TheVulture is offline
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Horlen was the best pitcher in the AL in the ill fated year of 1967, but Jim Lonborg won the Cy Young award.
'64 Horlen was an absolute beast in strato-matic.
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