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  #1  
Old 07-01-2012, 05:33 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Default The 1965 White Sox Through the Eyes of a Child

When I was about 7 years old in 1992 my great-grandfather sent me a box. It wasn’t my birthday and it wasn’t near Christmas, it was just because. There were about 500 baseball cards in that box, and I was hooked. As a kid I amassed what is now a substantially worthless collection of about 20,000 cards, and I would sift through the cards while I watched baseball games on TV, examining a player's card when he was up to bat or the starting pitcher. Now I actively collect vintage White Sox cards in mid- to high-grade. I’m one card away from completely finishing my first year, 1965, a 30-card set.

A couple weeks ago, I started thinking about what I was going to do with the set once I finished. I realized that other than the White Sox’ record at the end of the season and what place the team finished in (both of which I looked up when I started on the set), I really didn’t know much about the 1965 team at all. I wish I'd had a chance to watch some of these lesser-known White Sox players while collecting their cards, like I did in the '90s. So decided I would do a little research, learning about the team’s season by learning about each White Sox player with a card in the set.

The theory is simple: each player on a baseball team makes some sort of impact on that team over the course of a season. Each one has a season worth of stats which, in the aggregate, affected the team’s season. And most if not all had at least a few memorable moments which had a direct impact on the outcome of a particular game.

Starting with my next post in this thread, I will cover those players who played for the 1965 White Sox but do not have a card, as well as those players who did not play for the 1965 White Sox but do have a card. After that, I’ll take one player at a time, posting his 1965 Topps card. I’ll give a brief bio of the player, closely examine his 1965 season, and describe one particular game where he had a direct impact. Those games will go in chronological order, and my only request is that the team’s record and place in the standings not be revealed until the end of the project. Obviously that information can be found with the click of a button on the Internet, but I think some younger readers might enjoy letting the season unfold as it would have if they’d been following the team during the summer of 1965…and those who were fans in 1965 might enjoy reliving the season!
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  #2  
Old 07-01-2012, 06:09 PM
soxfan1965 soxfan1965 is offline
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That was a pretty good team (esp #31) and season.
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  #3  
Old 07-01-2012, 06:56 PM
Southsider101 Southsider101 is offline
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The 1965 team was a excellent ball club. While they sometimes had trouble scoring runs, the pitching featured starters Joel Horlen, Gary Peters, John Buzhardt, and a young 22 year old Tommy John. Hoyt Wilhelm had a stellar year with a 1.81 ERA.

Last edited by Southsider101; 07-04-2012 at 12:43 PM. Reason: respect wish of OP
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Old 07-01-2012, 07:00 PM
LITTLE NELL LITTLE NELL is offline
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All I will say is that in October of 1965 I enlisted in the USAF and every year that I followed the Sox up to that point, they were Pennant contenders and all I knew was Southside winning Baseball. By the time I was discharged in 1969 things had changed drastically.
Look forward to reliving that season through your posts.
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Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 07-02-2012 at 05:52 AM.
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  #5  
Old 07-01-2012, 07:12 PM
Noneck Noneck is offline
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My eyes were of a child that year and they always saw hope. Now as a old man whose eyes has seen so many years, they see things so much differently.
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  #6  
Old 07-01-2012, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BRDSR View Post
Iím one card away from completely finishing my first year, 1965, a 30-card set.
I have a handful of Sox cards from 1965 (Gary Peters, Moose and Horlen). I love that design with the little pennant in the bottom corner w/ team name and logo. Someday if I hit the lottery, I'd like to build that entire set.
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Old 07-01-2012, 10:33 PM
PaleHoser PaleHoser is offline
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Is it too soon to share which card you're missing from the set?

I used to collect White Sox team sets years ago. The high numbered cards from the 1960's were always a bear to find, particularly in quality condition. The 1967 Tommy John was particularly tough to find because it was the last card issued in that set.
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:31 PM
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RCWHITESOX RCWHITESOX is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LITTLE NELL View Post
All I will say is that in October of 1965 I enlisted in the USAF and every year that I followed the Sox up to that point, they were Pennant contenders and all I knew was Southside winning Baseball. By the time I was discharged in 1969 things had changed drastically.
Look forward to reliving that season through your posts.
You must have really have looked forward to your Stars and Stripes paper!
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Old 07-03-2012, 05:28 AM
LITTLE NELL LITTLE NELL is offline
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Originally Posted by RCWHITESOX View Post
You must have really have looked forward to your Stars and Stripes paper!
When I was stationed at Nha Trang Air Force Base in Viet Nam in 1968 I worked from 11pm to 7am and the Star and Stripes was flown in daily at 11am, I would get up at 1030am to make sure to get my copy to see what the Sox did and then went back to bed. 1968 was the first losing season I experienced as a Sox fan as I started following them in the early 50s.
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Old 07-03-2012, 05:18 PM
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RCWHITESOX RCWHITESOX is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LITTLE NELL View Post
When I was stationed at Nha Trang Air Force Base in Viet Nam in 1968 I worked from 11pm to 7am and the Star and Stripes was flown in daily at 11am, I would get up at 1030am to make sure to get my copy to see what the Sox did and then went back to bed. 1968 was the first losing season I experienced as a Sox fan as I started following them in the early 50s.
I was in the Navy a few years after you and stationed in Pearl Harbor. We were a west pact patrol DER. Went to Vietnam, China, Tailand, Phillipines, Japan, and Guam. I was always awaiting mail delivery while out to sea; looking for my copy of the paper.
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:35 PM
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I was 8 in 1965 and collecting baseball cards took every stray nickel I had. The Checklist cards were my favorite. I still have the 1964 Yearbook "Operation White Sox."
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Old 07-04-2012, 11:05 AM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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I am currently in the Air Force, stationed at Luke AFB. All in all, the lifestyle is very enjoyable. But one very real sacrifice is being away from home, friends, and family. Following the White Sox through DirectTV's MLB package and projects like this keep me connected to home and those friends and family that also follow the White Sox.

34 different players stepped up to the plate or took the mound for the 1965 Chicago White Sox, but only 24 have White Sox baseball cards in the 1965 Topps set. The following players do not have White Sox cards in the set:

-Frank Lary, 26.2 IP
-Ted Wills, 19 IP
-Johnny Romano, 425 PA
-Gene Freese, 38 PA
-Bill Voss, 37 PA
-Tommie Agee, 21 PA
-Jim Hicks, 19 PA
-Duane Josephson, 11 PA
-Dick Kenworthy, 3 PA
-Bill Heath, 1 PA

By far the most significant absentee is Johnny Romano, the White Sox starting catcher in 1965. (J.C. Martin also saw significant time behind the plate.) Romano had been traded to the White Sox in January 1965 from the Indians in part of a three-team trade. The White Sox traded Mike Hershberger, Jim Landis, and Fred Talbot to the Kansas City Athletics. In addition to Romano, the White Sox also received Tommy John and Tommie Agee from the Indians. Interestingly, although Johnny Romano and Tommie Agee appear in the 1965 set as members of the Cleveland Indians, Topps managed to put Tommy John on a White Sox card before production of the set began.

At the peak of his career, Romano had played in two all-star games, but by 1965 was dipping below his career average in most major categories. He batted .242 with 39 runs, 48 RBI, and 18 HRs for the 1965 Chicago White Sox. He threw out 22 of 69 base stealers and allowed 11 passed balls.

In addition, five players appear on White Sox cards but did not play for the 1965 team:

-Fred Talbot (Traded to KCA during off-season)
-Mike Hershberger (Traded to KCA during off-season)
-Dave DeBusschere (Decided on a professional basketball career)
-Joel Gibson (Never made it to the big leagues)
-Gene Stephens (Never made it back to the big leagues after the 1964 season)

The remaining 24 players and manager Al Lopez have White Sox baseball cards in the 1965 set. I'll examine each one, starting in my next post with Don Buford, highlighting his performance on April 27, 1965.
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Old 07-04-2012, 11:24 AM
RowanDye RowanDye is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southsider101 View Post
The 1965 team was a excellent ball club. They finished ------------- with a ------ record.
Spoiler alert! I think the original poster requested not to post their record and standing.
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  #14  
Old 07-07-2012, 05:36 PM
BRDSR BRDSR is offline
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Default Don Buford



A major-league player for 10 seasons, Don Buford broke into the big leagues in 1963 with the White Sox after signing as a free agent with the team in November 1959. At only 5’7” and 160 pounds, Buford was a prototypical leadoff hitter much of his career. He always scored more runs than he batted in, including 99 runs scored for the Baltimore Orioles each season between 1969 and 1971. He stole 12 or more bases in eight different seasons, including 51 for the White Sox in 1966. He also led the league in being caught three times. His 93 career home runs demonstrate that he always had a little power, but he seemed to get stronger in the World Series; in 58 Fall Classic at bats for the Baltimore Orioles between 1969 and 1971, he hit an impressive four home runs. Between batting leadoff, his quick speed, and good situational hitting, Don Buford owns the distinction of being the most difficult major league player to double up: in 4,553 career at bats, he grounded into only 33 double plays.

Although he also played a lot of left field and third base over the course of his career, Buford primarily played second base for the White Sox in 1965. He played in 155 games for the ’65 team, starting at second base 128 times and third base 15 times. Though known as a leadoff hitter, Al Lopez often put the switch-hitting Buford in the #2 slot in 1965. Buford’s 93 runs and 166 hits were tops on the White Sox in 1965, and his .283 batting average and .358 OBP was the best of any starter on the team. His .982 fielding percentage was also very respectable for an infielder. For his 1965 efforts, Buford garnered three MVP vote points, finishing in 25th place. His performance was apparently comparable to legend Mickey Mantle and teammate Floyd Robinson, both of whom also received three points.

The season started a little later in the 1960s than it does now, and the White Sox had only played 10 games coming into their April 27th Tuesday evening contest with the Boston Red Sox. At 7-3 and with four wins in a row, the White Sox were tied for first with the Minnesota Twins coming into play. The Red Sox kicked off the scoring with a 2nd inning solo home run by Tony Conigliaro off John Buzhardt, but after that it was all White Sox. Although the ’65 team didn’t usually overwhelm opponents at the plate, when they did, Don Buford was probably involved. Buford went 4-5 with four singles on the 27th, scoring twice and picking up two RBI. The White Sox first run was on Buford’s first single of the game, a bunt fielded by Red Sox catcher Bob Tillman. Tillman promptly threw the ball away; Cater scored from first base and Buford advanced to third base. Buford’s first run put the White Sox ahead in the bottom of the third when he scored on a Pete Ward single. He added an RBI in the 4th on a single which scored Buzhardt. And in the 7th he helped put the game away. Buford led off the inning, singled, and scored on an error by second baseman Felix Mantilla. When Buford batting again, his single to right drove in Ken Berry, but the inning was ended when Danny Cater was thrown out at third by Conigliaro, who was playing right field.

When it was all over, the White Sox had won 10-1, with five of their runs unearned due to three Red Sox errors. Buford’s four singles had directly or indirectly resulted in five runs. The Twins also won, and so the two teams remained tied for first place. A child thumbing through his baseball cards on April 27th might have noticed Buford’s .336 average and 114 runs two years earlier for the Sox’ farm team and wondered whether he would replicate that production for the White Sox in 1965.
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  #15  
Old 07-07-2012, 06:23 PM
fisk4ever fisk4ever is offline
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BRDSR---This is my new favorite thread. Thanks for putting it on the board!
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