White Sox Interactive Forums
Minor Observations

Welcome
Go Back   White Sox Interactive Forums > Baseball Discussions > Minor Observations
Home Chat Stats Register Blogs FAQ Calendar Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-28-2004, 11:06 AM
Frater Perdurabo Frater Perdurabo is offline
WSI Prelate
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 18,249
Blog Entries: 1
Default Questions for Daver, Randar and other scouts

I read in the Garcia trade thread that Anderson is showing similar OBP potential to Reed. That is good news and takes away some of the sting of losing Reed.

Does Anderson have plate discipline equal to Reed's? If not, do you expect it to progress to that level?

Put more simply, in your best estimation will Anderson make us forget about Reed?

Thanks in advance.
__________________
The universe is the practical joke of the General at the expense of the Particular, quoth Frater Perdurabo, and laughed. The disciples nearest him wept, seeing the Universal Sorrow. Others laughed, seeing the Universal Joke. Others wept. Others laughed. Others wept because they couldn't see the Joke, and others laughed lest they should be thought not to see the Joke. But though FRATER laughed openly, he wept secretly; and really he neither laughed nor wept. Nor did he mean what he said.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-28-2004, 04:10 PM
Randar68 Randar68 is offline
WSI High Priest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,009
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frater Perdurabo
I read in the Garcia trade thread that Anderson is showing similar OBP potential to Reed. That is good news and takes away some of the sting of losing Reed.

Does Anderson have plate discipline equal to Reed's? If not, do you expect it to progress to that level?

Put more simply, in your best estimation will Anderson make us forget about Reed?

Thanks in advance.
No, No, No. Anderson is nothing like Reed. Anderson is a power hitter with some decent contact skills. He'll never have the kind of plate coverage and discipline that Reed does. Any high OBP that he shows will be due to a high BA or being pitched around.

Anderson is likely to move to AA in the very near term now that a space will be created with the loss of Reed in AAA. Anderson is a much more natural CF'er defensively though, no question.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-28-2004, 04:14 PM
Randar68 Randar68 is offline
WSI High Priest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,009
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frater Perdurabo
I read in the Garcia trade thread that Anderson is showing similar OBP potential to Reed. That is good news and takes away some of the sting of losing Reed.

Does Anderson have plate discipline equal to Reed's? If not, do you expect it to progress to that level?

Put more simply, in your best estimation will Anderson make us forget about Reed?

Thanks in advance.
Think about this in another manner. Reed was not your typical White Sox prospect. He has a good eye, takes a lot of walks, doesn't strike out too much, and makes a lot of solid contact, with occassional power. Most Sox position prospects are like Joe Borchard or Josh Fields. Power hitters that succeed if they are able to learn the strike zone and make more consistent contact. Reed was something of a rarity, and that is why some are so disappointed at us giving him up. Was he going to be a super-star or perennial All-Star? Most likely not, but he would have been a valuable cog in the wheel of an offense that currently fails to manufacture runs or score consistently against above-average pitching.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-28-2004, 04:54 PM
rdivaldi rdivaldi is offline
WSI Church Elder
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Chicago - South Loop
Posts: 2,877
Default

But if you look at Anderson's numbers in Winston-Salem, you will notice that he has a very respectible 28:43 K:BB ratio in 248 at bats.

After watching both Reed and Anderson play many times, there's no doubt in mind that Anderson has a much higher ceiling. Whether or not he lives up to the potential is another story.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-28-2004, 06:09 PM
Randar68 Randar68 is offline
WSI High Priest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,009
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdivaldi
But if you look at Anderson's numbers in Winston-Salem, you will notice that he has a very respectible 28:43 K:BB ratio in 248 at bats.

After watching both Reed and Anderson play many times, there's no doubt in mind that Anderson has a much higher ceiling. Whether or not he lives up to the potential is another story.
44:29 K:BB ratio, you had it reversed.

That ios not terrible, but he's basically playing at a level just slightly above what he played at in College, and only Casey Rogowski has been hitting anything consistently in W-S, it's not like he's overly protected hitting in that line-up.

Do Anderson and Borchard have higher ceilings than Reed? I'd say yes on both counts, but I'd also say that Reed had a higher likelihood of success or of being a good regular MLB contributor. One was a sure thing with a low likelihood of that turning into a star, and the other 2 have star potential with a lower likelihood of reaching it.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-28-2004, 06:13 PM
Daver's Avatar
Daver Daver is offline
The Grand Wazoo
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: SW Suburbs
Posts: 26,641
Blog Entries: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randar68
44:29 K:BB ratio, you had it reversed.

That ios not terrible, but he's basically playing at a level just slightly above what he played at in College, and only Casey Rogowski has been hitting anything consistently in W-S, it's not like he's overly protected hitting in that line-up.

Do Anderson and Borchard have higher ceilings than Reed? I'd say yes on both counts, but I'd also say that Reed had a higher likelihood of success or of being a good regular MLB contributor. One was a sure thing with a low likelihood of that turning into a star, and the other 2 have star potential with a lower likelihood of reaching it.
Exactly.


I would say Sweeney has a higher potential cieling as well.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-28-2004, 06:39 PM
Randar68 Randar68 is offline
WSI High Priest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,009
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daver
Exactly.


I would say Sweeney has a higher potential cieling as well.
I agree, but he's not as advanced as the other 2 at this point, so it's a little harder to project his power and potential accurately. He also isn't quite the all-around athlete the other 2 are, IMO.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-28-2004, 07:08 PM
rdivaldi rdivaldi is offline
WSI Church Elder
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Chicago - South Loop
Posts: 2,877
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randar68
44:29 K:BB ratio, you had it reversed.
Oops, my bad.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-14-2004, 12:54 AM
Rex Hudler Rex Hudler is offline
WSI Personality
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 872
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Randar68
44:29 K:BB ratio, you had it reversed.


That ios not terrible, but he's basically playing at a level just slightly above what he played at in College, and only Casey Rogowski has been hitting anything consistently in W-S, it's not like he's overly protected hitting in that line-up.

Do Anderson and Borchard have higher ceilings than Reed? I'd say yes on both counts, but I'd also say that Reed had a higher likelihood of success or of being a good regular MLB contributor. One was a sure thing with a low likelihood of that turning into a star, and the other 2 have star potential with a lower likelihood of reaching it.
First of all, hello..... I never knew there was a minor league thread at WSI, so I am a little late in chiming in here. But I do feel the need to address one thing.

High A ball is not "slightly above Division I baseball". I love college baseball and see much SEC Baseball every year. But in no way is the quality of baseball in the major college conferences even close to high A. Yes, the best players (maybe 1-2 per team) at that level could take a shot at High A. But the rest are not close.

Think of it this way.... Most college rosters have 2-4 kids per year get drafted max. The rest either never get drafted or they get drafted a year or two later. Kids that are freshman and sophomores would not likely be in high A if they had signed out of high school instead. Only a rare few. Many of the college juniors and seniors never even make it to high Class A. Most never get drafted at all. College baseball is good baseball and it is very exciting to watch, but your best teams would have difficulty competing in low Class A, if that. Most are probably more comparable to Advanced Rookie leagues.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-14-2004, 11:45 AM
Randar68 Randar68 is offline
WSI High Priest
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,009
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rex Hudler
First of all, hello..... I never knew there was a minor league thread at WSI, so I am a little late in chiming in here. But I do feel the need to address one thing.

High A ball is not "slightly above Division I baseball". I love college baseball and see much SEC Baseball every year. But in no way is the quality of baseball in the major college conferences even close to high A. Yes, the best players (maybe 1-2 per team) at that level could take a shot at High A. But the rest are not close.

Think of it this way.... Most college rosters have 2-4 kids per year get drafted max. The rest either never get drafted or they get drafted a year or two later. Kids that are freshman and sophomores would not likely be in high A if they had signed out of high school instead. Only a rare few. Many of the college juniors and seniors never even make it to high Class A. Most never get drafted at all. College baseball is good baseball and it is very exciting to watch, but your best teams would have difficulty competing in low Class A, if that. Most are probably more comparable to Advanced Rookie leagues.
Here is my point. Even in high A-ball, you have many raw 20-22 year olds, akin to most starting players in major D1 programs. Are their ceilings as high? not most of the time. The best players from D1 can make the jump to High-A ball and it is only a slight adjustment for them. I think Pac-10, SEC, and Big 12 baseball is a better level of competition than low A ball, but I clearly said it's not to the level of High A, slightly below.

I stand by my assessment.

Last edited by Randar68; 07-14-2004 at 12:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Forum Jump




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:35 PM.




Design by: Michelle

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Site-specific editorial/photos Copyright ©2001 - 2008 White Sox Interactive. All rights reserved.