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we be jake
04-09-2008, 07:15 AM
Last night one of my boys and some buddies came over and wound up dragging out my old ball cards. I've got 4 albums of nothin' but Sox and got to looking at them after many years of sitting on a bookshelf. Some of the old guys were pleasant memories and some I don't even remember being on the team. Some were marginal players and some played for us on teams that weren't very good; not exactly household names, but they all got to wear the White Sox uniform and play, even if only for a while. You oldsters remember some of these guys?
Jim Derrington P
Dixie Howell p
Tom Qualters p
Ron Jackson 1b
Les Moss c
Cisco Carlos p
Fred Klages p
Bob Priddy p
Jack Fisher p
Don Pavletich c-1b
Duane Josephson c
Bob Christian of
Paul Edmondson p
Danny Murphy p
Gail Hopkins 1b
Rick Reichardt of
Ron Hansen ss-2b
Lee Stange p
Rich McKenney 3b-ss
luis Alvarado ss
Bobby Knoop 2b
Steve Huntz 2b
Steve Kealey p
Johnny Jeter of
Eddie Leon 2b
Chuck Brinkman c
Lee Richards inf
Jim Otten p
Nyls Nyman of
Dan Osborn P
Pete Varney c
Chris Knapp p
Kevin Bell 3b
Royle Stillman of
Lerrin LaGrow p
Jim Hughes p
Eric Soderholm 3b
Junior Moore 3b-2b
Henry Cruz of
John Verhoeven p
Steve Renko p
Thad Bosley of
Bill Nahorodny c
These are all guys from'57 to '77. No HOFers here but they all played on the Southside.
Do you remember some of these guys?

Railsplitter
04-09-2008, 07:25 AM
Rick Reichardt hit a homer in the first Sox I attended.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 07:37 AM
Rick Reichardt hit a homer in the first Sox I attended.

He once tied the record by Hitting 2 hrs in one inning - 1966 -Angels

He came to us in '71 - I think.

Jjav829
04-09-2008, 08:17 AM
Rich McKenney 3b-ss


I've heard he was a clutch hitter; perhaps the most clutch hitter some ever saw. True?

TomBradley72
04-09-2008, 10:32 AM
I saw Pete Varney's major league debut! (0-4)

comet2k
04-09-2008, 10:42 AM
Lee "BB" Richards couldn't hit worth a lick, but he was so fast he once tagged up from second base and scored on a long fly ball. No exaggeration.

PicktoCLick72
04-09-2008, 11:36 AM
No, I do not.

PatK
04-09-2008, 12:03 PM
Eric Soderholm owns a ticket agency.

Apparently, Uncle Jerry doesn't like him. We had our Bulls tickets revoked after the 1992 season because the Bulls somehow found out we sold some of our playoff tickets to him.

Someone in the organization told us that if it were any ticket broker other than Eric, it wouldn't have been a problem.

Procol Harum
04-09-2008, 12:12 PM
I've heard he was a clutch hitter; perhaps the most clutch hitter some ever saw. True?

As a gaffer I would agree that Rich McKinney did come up with some clutch hits back in his day at the turn of the '70s, but "most clutch hitter"!? Sounds like that must've come from someone absolutely Cub-fannish in their Kool-Aid drinking boosterism--after all, wouldn't you think the "most clutch hitter" ever would've done a bit more in his career?

comet2k
04-09-2008, 12:23 PM
Pete Varney was a No. 1 pick out of Harvard, dispelling the myth that the equipment catchers wear are "tools of ignorance." When Varney was in the minors, Harry Caray used to rave about him like he was going to be better than Johnny Bench, but he fizzled with the Sox.

tebman
04-09-2008, 12:37 PM
Duane Josephson c
Ron Hansen ss-2b
Bobby Knoop 2b
Nyls Nyman of
Chris Knapp p
Kevin Bell 3b
Royle Stillman of
Lerrin LaGrow p
Eric Soderholm 3b
Steve Renko p
Thad Bosley of
Bill Nahorodny c


I recognize these names. Hansen was a sure-handed shortstop when I was a kid. Most of the rest were from the '70s. Kevin Bell was a can't-miss prospect who fizzled out -- he lived in my neighborhood for a while during the 1980 season. Lerrin LaGrow was a reliever who had a brief flash of success and then vanished. Eric Soderholm was a guy I admired because he came back from knee surgery after the Twins had written him off and had a monster year on that lengendary/wacky '77 team.

All these guys are great candidates for one of those where-are-they-now articles.

Jurr
04-09-2008, 12:40 PM
Thad Bosley as well as Scott Fletcher seemed to grace every pack of baseball cards I ever purchased as a child.

kba
04-09-2008, 12:45 PM
Lerrin LaGrow was a reliever who had a brief flash of success and then vanished.

LaGrow is most famous for having a bat thrown at him in the 1972 ALCS while with the Tigers. He hit Bert Campaneris with a pitch, Campaneris threw his bat toward the mound, and a bench-clearing brawl broke out.

He saved 25 games for the South Side Hit Men in '77.

Lip Man 1
04-09-2008, 12:47 PM
Wow...lot's of stuff here:

Jake:

Reichardt was acquired by Roland Hemond for the Sox on February 9, 1971 for Jerry "Wheat Germ Kid" Janeski. Another Roland steal. Reichardt played football for Wisconsin and played in the Rose Bowl.

Jjav:

Rich McKinney actually wasn't much of a player. Hemond unloaded him to the Yankees for Stan Bahnsen one hour after getting Dick Allen. All Stan did was win 21 for the Sox later that year.

Comet:

That's true. Richards scored from second on a deep sac fly at Comiskey Park. I was at that game.

Pat:

Here's Eric's interview with WSI. He talks about the ticket agency and the issues with Jerry although I since understand the two have patched things up: http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=11&id=2073

Lip

kba
04-09-2008, 02:05 PM
Other trivia:

Luis Alvarado was acquired from the Red Sox for Luis Aparicio. Alvarado was one of several players on this list who were considered can't-miss prospects. All of them missed.

Eddie Leon was a light hitting second baseman acquired from Cleveland in exchange for Walt "No Neck" Williams.

Chuck Brinkman was a back-up catcher to Ed Hermann in the early '70's. Chuck's brother - Ed - was a Gold Glove shortstop for Detroit.

Reichardt signed a then-record $200,000 signing bonus out of college. But a kidney ailment hampered his career. He had some sort of dispute with the Sox in 1973 and they released him mid-season.

Bob Priddy and Bobby Knoop were traded for each other in 1969. I think Knoop was a Sox coach for a couple years after his playing days were over in the 70's.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 03:57 PM
I've heard he was a clutch hitter; perhaps the most clutch hitter some ever saw. True?

I couldn't say for sure, but his '71 card says he hit .168 his rook year ('70) in 43 games and 119 ABs.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 04:04 PM
I saw Pete Varney's major league debut! (0-4)

He had 4 Abs in '73 and 0 hits - we brought him back up in '74 when he had 28 ABs and 7 hits. #1 draft pick '71

In '75 he hit .271

we be jake
04-09-2008, 04:05 PM
Lee "BB" Richards couldn't hit worth a lick, but he was so fast he once tagged up from second base and scored on a long fly ball. No exaggeration.

Yep - speedster - "Bee Bee, baby!"

we be jake
04-09-2008, 04:07 PM
Eric Soderholm owns a ticket agency.

Apparently, Uncle Jerry doesn't like him. We had our Bulls tickets revoked after the 1992 season because the Bulls somehow found out we sold some of our playoff tickets to him.

Someone in the organization told us that if it were any ticket broker other than Eric, it wouldn't have been a problem.

Wow -too bad - Eric was a fan favorite.

LITTLE NELL
04-09-2008, 04:08 PM
The only ones I dont remember are Tim Hughes and Henry Cruz.
Dixie Howell was a favorite back in the mid 50s, he was a pretty good relief pitcher that could also hit and was used as a pinch hitter quite often. The Sox always had some good hitting pitchers back then, Jack Harshman, Billy Pierce, Early Wynn, Dick Donovan and of course Gary Peters.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 04:21 PM
Kevin Bell was a can't-miss prospect who fizzled out -- he lived in my neighborhood for a while during the 1980 season. Lerrin LaGrow was a reliever who had a brief flash of success and then vanished. - /wacky '77 team.

All these guys are great candidates for one of those where-are-they-now articles.

Harry was high on Bell -and he looked great for a short while.
LaGrow, as someone said, struck fear, when he took the mound, in the hearts of Sox fans.

Bob Lemon's '77 team was cool -Bannister, Barrios, Bell, Brett, Brohamer, Carroll, Dent, Downing, Duncan, Essian, Forster, Garr, Goossage, Hamilton, Lamar Johnson, Knapp, Kravec, Kucek, Chet Lemon (one of my favs), Orta, Otten, Soderholm, Spencer, Stone, Turlecky, W. Wood

Minnie broke the record the year before, singling at age 53, shortly before his 54th b'day. Those were the days.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 04:27 PM
The only ones I dont remember are Tim Hughes and Henry Cruz.
Dixie Howell was a favorite back in the mid 50s, he was a pretty good relief pitcher that could also hit and was used as a pitch hitter quite often. The Sox always had some good hitting pitchers back then, Jack Harshman, Billy Pierce, Early Wynn, Dick Donovan and of course Gary Peters.

True, some pitchers could hit in those days. My over-achieving oldest brother still says it's BS that pitchers can't be hitters. lol

we be jake
04-09-2008, 04:38 PM
[quote=LITTLE NELL;1847755]The only ones I dont remember are Tim Hughes and Henry Cruz.

I remember Cruz - he was from St. Croix, Virgin Islands and a cool guy always wearing shades. We got him on waivers from the Dodgers in '77. He had 21 ABs for us that year, 6 hits - 2 of 'em homers.

I don't remember Hughes either. His card says we got him from the Twinks before the '78 season - he was 16-14 for Twinks in '75 w'3.82 era - his best year. After that...?

TDog
04-09-2008, 04:49 PM
Lee "BB" Richards couldn't hit worth a lick, but he was so fast he once tagged up from second base and scored on a long fly ball. No exaggeration.

So did Marc "Booter" Hill, a backup catcher for the Sox in the 1980s who was probably the slowest runner on the team. I would describe his speed at Konerko-esque, and I might be giving Hill a step or two. He stole one base in eight attempts in his 14-year career, probably on broken hit-and run plays. Scoring from second on a deep fly is rare, but I've seen it done a few times. The achievement does not always require speed.

I did see Lee Richard score from second on a wild pitch, which is something Marc Hill probably never did. Richard also is probably the only player in Sox history to have two of his numbers with the team retired. When he replaced Luis Aparicio at shortstop in 1971 (the Aparicio trade was a mistake, but I digress) Richard began wearing No. 11. The team switched him to No. 9 early in the season to take some of the pressure off. Of course, Aparicio's 11 and Minnie Minoso's 9 would later be retired.

I could tell you you a story or two about nearly everyone on the list, beginning at about Cisco Carlos (shut out the Tigers in the second game of the doubleheader that Joe Horlen began by no-hitting the Tigers). Chuck Brinkman, for example, perhaps the worst hitter every to wear a White Sox uniform, pitchers included, hit his only major league home run off of Rudy May.

It just makes me feel old to think there are Sox fans who don't remember these guys, many of whom taught me that sometimes baseball isn't pretty. I'm sure I'm making others feel old here by not recognizing most of the names before Cisco Carlos.

TDog
04-09-2008, 04:58 PM
LaGrow is most famous for having a bat thrown at him in the 1972 ALCS while with the Tigers. He hit Bert Campaneris with a pitch, Campaneris threw his bat toward the mound, and a bench-clearing brawl broke out.

He saved 25 games for the South Side Hit Men in '77.

Sorry, I have to add:

I was at a Sox game, probably in 1977, when Campaneris came up to bat against LaGrow. Campaneris wouldn't get in the box until talking to the umpire and LaGrow stepped off the mound. After I reminded the friend I was with about the 1972 incident, we had fun shouting at Campaneris, but we were down the first base line, and most of the people in the park apparently had no idea the pitcher and hitter had a history.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 05:21 PM
So did Marc "Booter" Hill, a backup catcher for the Sox in the 1980s who was probably the slowest runner on the team. I would describe his speed at Konerko-esque, and I might be giving Hill a step or two. He stole one base in eight attempts in his 14-year career, probably on broken hit-and run plays. Scoring from second on a deep fly is rare, but I've seen it done a few times. The achievement does not always require speed.

I did see Lee Richard score from second on a wild pitch, which is something Marc Hill probably never did. Richard also is probably the only player in Sox history to have two of his numbers with the team retired. When he replaced Luis Aparicio at shortstop in 1971 (the Aparicio trade was a mistake, but I digress) Richard began wearing No. 11. The team switched him to No. 9 early in the season to take some of the pressure off. Of course, Aparicio's 11 and Minnie Minoso's 9 would later be retired.

I could tell you you a story or two about nearly everyone on the list, beginning at about Cisco Carlos (shut out the Tigers in the second game of the doubleheader that Joe Horlen began by no-hitting the Tigers). Chuck Brinkman, for example, perhaps the worst hitter every to wear a White Sox uniform, pitchers included, hit his only major league home run off of Rudy May.

It just makes me feel old to think there are Sox fans who don't remember these guys, many of whom taught me that sometimes baseball isn't pretty. I'm sure I'm making others feel old here by not recognizing most of the names before Cisco Carlos.


Great stuff TDog! Good memory too.

Lip Man 1
04-09-2008, 05:31 PM
KBA:

It wasn't only Reichardt who got dumped by Stu Holcomb in 1973. Add Jay Johnstone, Ed Spezio, Mike Andrews. They were all flat out RELEASED by that moron because they wouldn't sign deals at the Sox price.

That's right, they weren't offered for trade... just released. Then when the Sox got hammered by injuries that year they had nothing left to go to.

Roland Hemond said in his WSI interview that Holcomb ordered him to release Stan Bahnsen as well. Hemond refused and with Chuck Tanner went to John Allyn and basically said, "him or us..." Allyn flew to Boston where the Sox were playing, to meet with Holcomb. Then he announced to the press he was "retiring" with Roland taking over as G.M.

Lip

TomBradley72
04-09-2008, 06:01 PM
Harry was high on Bell -and he looked great for a short while.


Didn't Bell severely injure his knee?

kba
04-09-2008, 06:02 PM
KBA:

It wasn't only Reichardt who got dumped by Stu Holcomb in 1973. Add Jay Johnstone, Ed Spezio, Mike Andrews. They were all flat out RELEASED by that moron because they wouldn't sign deals at the Sox price.

Which led to Andrews being involved in one of the oddest events in post-season history. After the Sox released him, he signed with the A's and made two crucial errors in Game 2 of the '73 World Series. A's owner Charlie Finley then tried to get him to fake an injury so he could be dropped from the roster before Game 3. The commissioner intervened, but Andrews' career was over.

Spezio and Reichardt also were at the end of their careers when the Sox released them. Johnstone, on the other hand, played twelve more years and became a .300+ hitter in Philadelphia.

MeteorsSox4367
04-09-2008, 06:04 PM
Didn't Bell severely injure his knee?

Thanks, TomBradley, I thought I remembered that as well. IIRC, wasn't it during a game against Oakland? I'm not sure who the catcher was, but I thought there was a play at the plate, Bell slid into the catcher and destroyed his knee, effectively ending his career.

Also, didn't Bell wear No. 8?

TDog
04-09-2008, 06:27 PM
KBA:

It wasn't only Reichardt who got dumped by Stu Holcomb in 1973. Add Jay Johnstone, Ed Spezio, Mike Andrews. They were all flat out RELEASED by that moron because they wouldn't sign deals at the Sox price.

That's right, they weren't offered for trade... just released. Then when the Sox got hammered by injuries that year they had nothing left to go to.

Roland Hemond said in his WSI interview that Holcomb ordered him to release Stan Bahnsen as well. Hemond refused and with Chuck Tanner went to John Allyn and basically said, "him or us..." Allyn flew to Boston where the Sox were playing, to meet with Holcomb. Then he announced to the press he was "retiring" with Roland taking over as G.M.

Lip

It's true that Holcomb wasn't a baseball man. He came from Northwestern and was a football guy. But Tanner and Hemond had come from the Angels system while Holcomb was a holdover from 1970. It's also true that Hemond was able to deal Stan Bahnsen to the A's for Dave Hamilton and a minor leaguer by the name of Chet Lemon.

Holcomb's hard line on salaries wasn't totally his fault, however. The Sox were nearly broke. I heard Hemond tell a story about how he had to trade Ed Herrmann to the Yankees for four minor leaguers and cash at the end of spring training because the Sox couldn't didn't have the money to break camp.

By the way, if you ever talk to Kevin Hickey, ask him to do his Rollie Hemond impression.

we be jake
04-09-2008, 07:28 PM
Didn't Bell severely injure his knee?

Yes -I think he did.

Southsider101
04-09-2008, 07:46 PM
Eric Soderholm owns a ticket agency.

Apparently, Uncle Jerry doesn't like him. We had our Bulls tickets revoked after the 1992 season because the Bulls somehow found out we sold some of our playoff tickets to him.

Someone in the organization told us that if it were any ticket broker (http://www.qklinkserver.com/lm/rtl3.asp?si=92&k=ticket%20broker&st=1) other than Eric, it wouldn't have been a problem.

Eric came over from the Twins in 1977 as a one of Bill Veeck's bargin basement free agents and was was a mainstay of the 1977 South Side Hitmen. He was the Twin's first round draft choice in 1968. Solderholm was a slick fielder, but was never the same after injuring his knee. He was traded to Texas in June 1979 for Ed Farmer and Gary Holle.

eastchicagosoxfan
04-09-2008, 10:53 PM
[quote=LITTLE NELL;1847755]The only ones I dont remember are Tim Hughes and Henry Cruz.

I remember Cruz - he was from St. Croix, Virgin Islands and a cool guy always wearing shades. We got him on waivers from the Dodgers in '77. He had 21 ABs for us that year, 6 hits - 2 of 'em homers.

I don't remember Hughes either. His card says we got him from the Twinks before the '78 season - he was 16-14 for Twinks in '75 w'3.82 era - his best year. After that...?
So, are you sitting in your living room looking at old baseball cards?

we be jake
04-09-2008, 11:25 PM
I was last night.

Lip Man 1
04-09-2008, 11:51 PM
TDog:

Actually Holcomb was running Allyn's professional soccer team. When it folded (no surprise there) Allyn was still on the hook for his salary so he decided in a fit of "brillance", OK he can run the baseball team!

Don't get your reference to Hemond and Tanner coming from the Angels system in the discussion?. Holcomb was the G.M. Hemond the director of player personnel and Tanner the field manager.

Let's just say that after Stu-baby's stupidity, Roland and Chuck had enough and fortunately as it turned out, they worked a 'palace coup' to get that clown 'retired.'

You are right about Herrmann (read his WSI interview). He was traded because the Sox couldn't afford (accoring to Ed) a 2,000 raise. Roland didn't want to but was basically told to do it.

But in 73 remember things weren't that bad, the Sox had a brilliant 72 season, Dick Allen was packing them in and they drew over a million. They had the money in 73...it was the 'prinicpal' to Holcomb which almost ran Hemond (and Chuck) out of town.

KBA:

The Sox used the DL 32 times in 1973. End of the line or not, guys like Reichardt, Spezio and Andrews were still an upgrade over the likes of Rich Morales, Chuck Brinkman and John "The Jet" Jeter.

In less then a season Holcomb tore down everything Roland and Chuck had been building since the off season going into 1971 and basically threw away all the good will earned by the 1972 season.

Just a real shame.

Lip

kba
04-10-2008, 10:20 AM
The Sox used the DL 32 times in 1973. End of the line or not, guys like Reichardt, Spezio and Andrews were still an upgrade over the likes of Rich Morales, Chuck Brinkman and John "The Jet" Jeter.

Johnny Jeter was another highly touted youngster who amounted to nothing. His son, Shawn, played 13 games for the Sox in 1992 - which I think gives them the distinction of being the most forgettable father-son duo ever to play on the Southside.

tebman
04-10-2008, 10:22 AM
Didn't Bell severely injure his knee?

Thanks, TomBradley, I thought I remembered that as well. IIRC, wasn't it during a game against Oakland? I'm not sure who the catcher was, but I thought there was a play at the plate, Bell slid into the catcher and destroyed his knee, effectively ending his career.

Also, didn't Bell wear No. 8?
Yes, he did wear #8. I know this from PHG's most excellent uniform-number page (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=3&id=1893). :cool:

I don't remember the details of his injury, but I know he was out of baseball in a hurry. A real shame.

My sort-of brush with greatness was when Bell, Rich Wortham, and Mike Proly all lived in rented townhouses in my Bolingbrook neighborhood in 1980. I didn't know them and saw each of them only once, but I had some bragging rights for a while.

Lip Man 1
04-10-2008, 10:46 AM
Kevin was involved in a home plate collision with the A's at Comiskey Park and wrecked his knee.

Lip

my5thbench
04-10-2008, 11:10 AM
I remember some of them, but it ain't exactly "Who's Who"

Jason82807
04-10-2008, 12:22 PM
I recognize the name Brinkman, but I was born in '82 so I've never actually seen him play.

babybull19
04-10-2008, 01:00 PM
a bum knee wasn't Bell's only problem....once the rest of the league discovered he couldn't hit a breaking ball he was pretty much done.....and yes, Harry did love this guy. Jim Morrison was a better 3B than Bell, better glove and better stick....hell, even Spanky was better than Bell:gulp::thome:
WHO DOESN'T LOVE THIS GUY?????

SOXfnNlansing
04-10-2008, 09:11 PM
About 15 years ago I was working for a company "US Tire & Exhaust" here in So Holland IL. Their HQ is in West Allis, WI. At that time Kevin Bell was a very popular sales rep with that company.

They had a company picnic one year and I attended. I was introduced to a bunch of people I didn't know. One of the people was Kevin Bell. I said to him, "there was a Sox player Kevin Bell when I was growing up". He was really suprised when I said that and told me it was him. I was pretty excited. Later that summer he sent me an autographed black and white photo. It was really cool. Don't know where that photo is today though.

Just thought this would be a nice story to share with everyone.

tick53
04-12-2008, 09:36 AM
I'm old enough to remember most of them. I thought Cisco Carlos was going to lead the Sox to the World Series. I still have the Sports Illustrated with his picture on the cover around here somewhere.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:09 AM
I've heard he was a clutch hitter; perhaps the most clutch hitter some ever saw. True?

McKinney was the best clutch hitter I've seen....His problem was he ONLY hit in the clutch.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:11 AM
Lee "BB" Richards couldn't hit worth a lick, but he was so fast he once tagged up from second base and scored on a long fly ball. No exaggeration.

That was on Opening Day 1970 on a long fly ball hit by Rich McKinney. BB was as fast as anyone I've ever seen.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:16 AM
Harry was high on Bell -and he looked great for a short while.
LaGrow, as someone said, struck fear, when he took the mound, in the hearts of Sox fans.

Bob Lemon's '77 team was cool -Bannister, Barrios, Bell, Brett, Brohamer, Carroll, Dent, Downing, Duncan, Essian, Forster, Garr, Goossage, Hamilton, Lamar Johnson, Knapp, Kravec, Kucek, Chet Lemon (one of my favs), Orta, Otten, Soderholm, Spencer, Stone, Turlecky, W. Wood

Minnie broke the record the year before, singling at age 53, shortly before his 54th b'day. Those were the days.

That '77 team is still my favorite of all time...Came out of nowhere after a horrible '76 season. Veeck gambled on players and they all worked out...It was like going to a rock concert every single night that season, the crowd was so wild...The Sox that season totally stole the fans from the Cubs...Had Alan Bannister at SS only been able to throw the ball (he was really an outfielder) they might have gotten in. They had traded Bucky Dent prior to that season but got Gamble, who led them with 31 homers in the non-HGH era.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:31 AM
KBA:

It wasn't only Reichardt who got dumped by Stu Holcomb in 1973. Add Jay Johnstone, Ed Spezio, Mike Andrews. They were all flat out RELEASED by that moron because they wouldn't sign deals at the Sox price.

That's right, they weren't offered for trade... just released. Then when the Sox got hammered by injuries that year they had nothing left to go to.

Roland Hemond said in his WSI interview that Holcomb ordered him to release Stan Bahnsen as well. Hemond refused and with Chuck Tanner went to John Allyn and basically said, "him or us..." Allyn flew to Boston where the Sox were playing, to meet with Holcomb. Then he announced to the press he was "retiring" with Roland taking over as G.M.

Lip

You have a great memory, Lip...
And people wonder why players fought so hard for free agency.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:34 AM
If I remember right, for a brief period, Stillman had actually beaten out Oscar Gamble as the team's DH in 1977. He looked like a good one for a while.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:42 AM
Wow...lot's of stuff here:

Jake:

Reichardt was acquired by Roland Hemond for the Sox on February 9, 1971 for Jerry "Wheat Germ Kid" Janeski. Another Roland steal. Reichardt played football for Wisconsin and played in the Rose Bowl.

Jjav:

Rich McKinney actually wasn't much of a player. Hemond unloaded him to the Yankees for Stan Bahnsen one hour after getting Dick Allen. All Stan did was win 21 for the Sox later that year.

Comet:

That's true. Richards scored from second on a deep sac fly at Comiskey Park. I was at that game.

Pat:

Here's Eric's interview with WSI. He talks about the ticket agency and the issues with Jerry although I since understand the two have patched things up: http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=11&id=2073

Lip
The Sox liked McKinney and put him at third (where he was average at best) and put Bill Melton in RF (where he was wretched).
The Yankees also thought McKinney was pretty good and gave up a pretty good pitcher in Bahnsen for him. McKinney, however, made three errors at third base on opening day in NY, got the crowd all over him (I remember watching from the Milwaukee feed out of Waukegan) and never was the same.
Charlie Finley also thought McKinney was good and talked him out of retirement to play with Oakland on one of those great early-70s teams.
Some trucking firm also liked McKinney where he ended up working.
The guy could really hit for a smaller guy. I think he was about 5-10 170 or something. I idolized him as a small kid because of his incredible clutch hitting.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:45 AM
If I remember right (and I haven't googled him yet), Edmonson was killed while he was with the Sox or just after in a car wreck.

tick53
04-13-2008, 10:43 AM
If I remember right (and I haven't googled him yet), Edmonson was killed while he was with the Sox or just after in a car wreck.

Edmondson was supposed to be the real thing. He was just up and coming with the Sox.

Bucky F. Dent
04-13-2008, 11:40 AM
I remember from Luis Alvarado down.

Lip Man 1
04-13-2008, 01:29 PM
Nada:

The Sox were shut out on opening day 1970 -- so that couldn't have been the game. I was at the game where Richard did this and I'm almost positive it was in 1971.

And here is the information on the late Paul Edmonson:

February 13, 1970 - Tragedy strikes the White Sox as promising young pitcher Paul Edmondson and his girl friend are killed in an accident on US-101 near Santa Barbara, California. On a rain slicked highway, Edmondsonís car skidded into on - coming traffic and was struck by another vehicle. In his major league debut in Anaheim on June 20, 1969, Edmondson fired a complete game two hitter beating California 9 - 1. It would be his only major league win.

Lip

TDog
04-13-2008, 02:10 PM
That was on Opening Day 1970 on a long fly ball hit by Rich McKinney. BB was as fast as anyone I've ever seen.

Richard was drafted by the Sox in the first round (sixth overall selected) in June 1970. He made his debut in the opening game doubleheader in Oakland, where he didn't score on a sacrifice fly. There were no Sox sacrifice flies in the home opener, an exciting last-at-bat 3-2 win over the Twins. His only other active opening days came in 1975, where he came in as a pinch runner in Oakland and as a pinch runner in the home opener. In neither case did he score. But I know I saw him score from second on a sacrifice fly sometime in 1971.

Rich McKinney, before the Sox drafted Richard (and brought him up too soon), was the heir-apparent to Luis Aparicio at shortstop. White Sox News, a few pages the White Sox public relations department put out at the time, did a story about the Sox expecting great things out of McKinney. Aparicio was stupidly traded after the 1970 season (especially considering an experienced shortstop could have made the difference against the A's in 1972).

Bill Melton, was a natural outfielder who was moved to third in the minor leagues. He never made an error in the outfield and had 11 assists in 82 major league games. Not that I believe filed percentages tell you much, but I didn't think he was that bad after his misplayed a double into a triple in his debut in right field on July 17, 1970 (I was there for my 13th birthday). I have seen a lot worse, including Richie Zisk.

TornLabrum
04-13-2008, 02:36 PM
You oldsters remember some of these guys?
Jim Derrington P - The name. He didn't play in many games.
Dixie Howell p - One of my favorites as a little kid.
Tom Qualters p - Nope.
Ron Jackson 1b - Very tall (6'7"?) first baseman who couldn't hit his height.
Les Moss c - Sherm Lollar's backup. Always caught game 2 of doubleheaders.
Cisco Carlos p - I thought he was going to be great. I was wrong.
Fred Klages p - Bare.y
Bob Priddy p - He was one of my Jim Willoughby type players. I don't know why I liked him.
Jack Fisher p - Fat Jack. Couldn't pitch for the Mets. Couldn't pitch for us either.
Don Pavletich c-1b - God those teams sucked. Another one we caught on the downward spiral of his career.
Duane Josephson c - I loved Josie. I don't know why. Same reason I liked Jim Willoughby.
Bob Christian of - Showed promise. Died young.
Paul Edmondson p - Now we're getting into sucky players for sucky teams....
Danny Murphy p - Hell, I remember this guy as a bonus baby for the Cubs. Came back as a relief pitcher that I loved for no reason (see Jim Willoughby).
Gail Hopkins 1b - Many will remember that I'm the unofficial president of his unofficial fan club. (See Jim Willoughby)
Rick Reichardt of - Harry Caray was all over this guy. I liked him and was sad to see him go.
Ron Hansen ss-2b - Mr. Clutch, and a pretty good SS who had the misfortune of replacing and being replaced by Luis Aparicio.
Lee Stange p - Crappy pitcher at the end of a very unproductive career.
Rich McKenney 3b-ss - His bat was too mini. (From an article about the Sox in the Daily News.)
luis Alvarado ss - Had the right first name and last initial. That was about it.
Bobby Knoop 2b - The best thing I can say about his is that his name was pronounced K-nop.
Steve Huntz 2b - Bobby Knoop was better.
Steve Kealey p - See Jim Willoughby.
Johnny Jeter of - Johnny the Jet. If only he could hit as well as he could run.
Eddie Leon 2b - Now we're just getting into crap....
Chuck Brinkman c - Ed's brother. Best I can say for him.
Lee Richards inf - Bee Bee. Unbelievably fast. Unbelievably bad hitter.
Jim Otten p - Now we're just getting ridiculous....
Nyls Nyman of - Pronounced Niles Nye-man. That's the best I can say about him.
Dan Osborn P - Best I can say about this guy is that he's not related to Ozzy.
Pete Varney c - Steve Swisher was better.
Chris Knapp p - Had a good season in '77, so we got rid of him.
Kevin Bell 3b - We're still waiting for Kevin to become the greatest Sox third baseman since Bill Melton.
Royle Stillman of - He proved with the Sox that he didn't belong in the major leagues.
Lerrin LaGrow p - Now here was a pretty good relief pitcher.
Jim Hughes p - Don't remember him.
Eric Soderholm 3b - Comeback player of the year.
Junior Moore 3b-2b - Now here's a perfect example of a never was.
Henry Cruz of - Okay, here's a perfect example of a never was.
John Verhoeven p - Okay, HERE'S a perfect example of a never was.
Steve Renko p - Came from the Cubs and left after less than a season.
Thad Bosley of - I had higher hopes for him than he ever produced. Was better with the Cubs.
Bill Nahorodny c - Naha...Ah-ha.... See Jim Willoughby...

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 04:26 PM
Richard was drafted by the Sox in the first round (sixth overall selected) in June 1970. He made his debut in the opening game doubleheader in Oakland, where he didn't score on a sacrifice fly. There were no Sox sacrifice flies in the home opener, an exciting last-at-bat 3-2 win over the Twins. His only other active opening days came in 1975, where he came in as a pinch runner in Oakland and as a pinch runner in the home opener. In neither case did he score. But I know I saw him score from second on a sacrifice fly sometime in 1971.

Rich McKinney, before the Sox drafted Richard (and brought him up too soon), was the heir-apparent to Luis Aparicio at shortstop. White Sox News, a few pages the White Sox public relations department put out at the time, did a story about the Sox expecting great things out of McKinney. Aparicio was stupidly traded after the 1970 season (especially considering an experienced shortstop could have made the difference against the A's in 1972).

Bill Melton, was a natural outfielder who was moved to third in the minor leagues. He never made an error in the outfield and had 11 assists in 82 major league games. Not that I believe filed percentages tell you much, but I didn't think he was that bad after his misplayed a double into a triple in his debut in right field on July 17, 1970 (I was there for my 13th birthday). I have seen a lot worse, including Richie Zisk.

BB's scoring from second was a memory--I could have sworn it was opening day, but oh well. It was early in the season and the BB hype was big...
I didn't know that about Melton being an OF..I don't think he lasted too long out there...
I'm surprised McKinney was considered the heir apparent to Aparicio as a SS as he never struck me as a good fielder. I thought he'd last a good 10 to 15 years cuz of his stick...I read some article on him somewhere that he soured on baseball and wanted to drive a truck or something...strange.
I also remember McKinney and Melton going back-to-back to left field against the Cubs in that city series one time and I was able to give it to the Cub kids on my block on the north side...We had little to cheer about those days going up against Banks, Santo, Williams etc.

TDog
04-13-2008, 04:39 PM
...
I didn't know that about Melton being an OF..I don't think he lasted too long out there...

Melton in 1970 played 71 games in right and 70 games at third. He was moved from third in July after making a bunch of errors, including the pop up that broke his nose. When Chuck Tanner came to manage the last 16 games (3-13, by the way, were the Sox in that span), he moved Melton to third and Carlos May to first.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 04:42 PM
I agree Lip..I really thought Bosley would be good. He was like an emotionally-charged Jerry Owens.
The thing I remember about Junior Moore is that Mary Frances Veeck talked about how he didn't like the way he looked and she kept telling him that he had an interesting-looking face for about half of her Bill and Mary Frances Veeck Show while I was hoping they'd get to some better stuff...
Nyls Nyman came up at the end of one season and looked terrific, hitting like .429. They gave him a shot the next year and I don't think he got up to .200.
Here are a couple of others...
Pablo Torrealba
Sam Matias
Randy Johnson (not the one you're thinking and if you don't know him, don't feel bad. I stumped Roland Hemond on this guy and he dealt him for a big-time player.)
Ed Spezio
Leon Wagner

TDog
04-13-2008, 04:50 PM
...
Sam Matias ...

You're thinking of Johnny Matias, who came over to the Sox when they reacquired Aparicio from Baltimore. He was the phenom of the 1970 spring camp, hitting close to .500. He did nothing to impress when the team came north. He only deprived Walter Williams of playing time while hitting under .200. But one day he did save Ken Berry an error. Perhaps the only time Ken Berry ever dropped a routine fly, Johnny Matias was there to catch the ball before it hit the ground and snatch an assist from the jaws of error.

NADA SURF
04-13-2008, 06:24 PM
You're thinking of Johnny Matias, who came over to the Sox when they reacquired Aparicio from Baltimore. He was the phenom of the 1970 spring camp, hitting close to .500. He did nothing to impress when the team came north. He only deprived Walter Williams of playing time while hitting under .200. But one day he did save Ken Berry an error. Perhaps the only time Ken Berry ever dropped a routine fly, Johnny Matias was there to catch the ball before it hit the ground and snatch an assist from the jaws of error.
I remember a Matias on the Sox and kinda liked him for a while...Who was Sam anyway? Any idea?

SCarolina_Ron
04-13-2008, 06:53 PM
I was at a double-header at Comiskey in August '72 with Boston. Luis Alvarado hit a walk-off HR (I think his only ML HR) to win the first game and put the Sox in first place over the A's. Unfortunately they lost the 2nd game and went back to second place for the rest of the season.

gaelhound
04-13-2008, 10:02 PM
I've heard he was a clutch hitter; perhaps the most clutch hitter some ever saw. True? Won the 1971 Home opener with an RBI single late in the game if IIRC.

TornLabrum
04-13-2008, 10:03 PM
I remember a Matias on the Sox and kinda liked him for a while...Who was Sam anyway? Any idea?

I have no idea who Sam Matias was, but I do remember Pineapple John Matias. One thing I didn't know when I looked him up at baseball-reference.com: He was Joe DeSa's uncle.

TDog
04-13-2008, 10:18 PM
I remember a Matias on the Sox and kinda liked him for a while...Who was Sam anyway? Any idea?

I can't find any record of a Sam Matias playing major league baseball. I Googled Sam Matias and came up with a football player at Yale who went went to Valparaiso High School. I had never heard of him, and I have friends in Valpo. Johnny "Pineapple" Matias, a native of Hawaii, had 22 hits in 58 major league games. He did hit two home runs, but it wasn't exactly a "hard" .188 career batting average.

Luis Alvarado, by the way, never hit a game-ending home run, according to the Baseball Retrosheet. In the game SCarolina_Ron is thinking of, Alvarado hit his third home run of the season to lead off the fifth inning and tie the game. Alvarado had a chance to end the game. He flied out for the second out in the ninth, and, after a pinch-hit single by Walter Williams, Jorge Orta won the 9-7 game with a three-run homer.

Four days earlier, on a Wednesday afternoon, I was standing in the last row of the centerfield bleachers, at the base of the scoreboard with my little brother, when Alvarado made the scene explode with a second-inning three-run, two out inside the park home run to start the scoring in an 8-6 Sox win over the Brewers. That summer was more fun than 1977.

MeteorsSox4367
04-13-2008, 10:24 PM
Are you guys thinking of Sam Mejias who was a backup outfielder with the Expos and some other teams in the late 70s?

Lip Man 1
04-13-2008, 10:56 PM
S.Carolina:

The game you are thinking about was the first game of a DH on August 20, 1972. The Sox scored four in the 9th to win it, capped off by Pat Kelly's three run game winning blast. I have the game on audio.

Lip

TDog
04-13-2008, 11:56 PM
S.Carolina:

The game you are thinking about was the first game of a DH on August 20, 1972. The Sox scored four in the 9th to win it, capped off by Pat Kelly's three run game winning blast. I have the game on audio.

Lip

You're right -- and you would be if you have the game on audio. I read Pat Kelly and I typed Jorge Orta.

SCarolina_Ron
04-19-2008, 07:11 AM
You're right -- and you would be if you have the game on audio. I read Pat Kelly and I typed Jorge Orta.

Thanks Lip & TDog for clearing that up. Guess I've lost a few brain cells since then (or had too many Falstaffs that day):cool:

we be jake
04-19-2008, 04:57 PM
"Kevin Bell 3b - We're still waiting for Kevin to become the greatest Sox third baseman since Bill Melton"


LOL - torn - harry loved this guy - and he looked great for a couple of weeks.

NADA SURF
04-19-2008, 05:02 PM
I don't think Harry was every higher on a player than Kevin Bell...anyone know what Kevin Bell is doing now? I thought I read years later that he's in the automotive industry."Kevin Bell 3b - We're still waiting for Kevin to become the greatest Sox third baseman since Bill Melton"


LOL - torn - harry loved this guy - and he looked great for a couple of weeks.

we be jake
04-19-2008, 06:05 PM
I don't think Harry was every higher on a player than Kevin Bell...anyone know what Kevin Bell is doing now? I thought I read years later that he's in the automotive industry.

Nada - look on the thread at an earlier post - one of our guys here met him as a sales rep for a tire company - it was a cool story.