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Fenway
03-14-2008, 11:49 AM
And the price keeps going up

Keith Olberman's family first bought season tickets at Yankee Stadium in 1972 at a cost of $4 a game

That same ticket today is $250 :o:

The Cubs are selling tickets at a record pace 2,775,000 already sold for 2008.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/B/BBO_TOUGH_TICKETS?SITE=RIPRJ&SECTION=SPORTS&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

white sox bill
03-14-2008, 12:06 PM
And Buds doing a terrible job!

bigfoot
03-14-2008, 09:55 PM
Obviously there needs to be another Congressional investigation into this matter. Didn't the latest HGH/Steroid/Amphetamine scandal simply put off the masses from even thinking of going to another game? And..........What about the children!> :gulp::gulp::gulp:

DoItForDanPasqua
03-14-2008, 10:14 PM
And the price keeps going up

Keith Olberman's family first bought season tickets at Yankee Stadium in 1972 at a cost of $4 a game

That same ticket today is $250 :o:

The Cubs are selling tickets at a record pace 2,775,000 already sold for 2008.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/B/BBO_TOUGH_TICKETS?SITE=RIPRJ&SECTION=SPORTS&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

This is baseball's true golden age. In 1955, which was in the middle of the decade that baseball was considered by some to be in its prime, here are a few attendance numbers.

The new Milwaukee Braves were the only team to draw over two million; the Yankees had the second highest attendance at just below 1.5 million.
The Sox drew 1.17 Million
The Cubs drew 875,000
There were eight teams that had an attendance below one million fans.

Though there are many more people living in the United States than in 1955, the entertainment options available today are much greater than in the 50s. Baseball can be watched in high definition on a plasma screen, but people are going out to the ballpark in record numbers.

ChicagoG19
03-14-2008, 11:30 PM
I think it is great many people are going to the ballpark, but I also worry that as I get older that I will eventually get priced out of game. I wonder what families will do thirty years from now because the price of baseball tickets is increasing faster than the average person's raise of 2%.

LongLiveFisk
03-15-2008, 10:48 AM
The Cubs are selling tickets at a record pace 2,775,000 already sold for 2008.

Well of course. This is their year. :wooty:

TDog
03-15-2008, 01:28 PM
When I came of age as a Sox fan, the most expensive seat in the park cost $3.50. My mother was a teacher with a couple of years of experience, and one of the best players on the Sox, Carlos May, was paid about twice what she was.

This year, on Carlos May's 60th birthday, I'm hoping to see the Sox in San Francisco. I checked the availability of tickets last night and found tickets in every price range. But the cheapest ticket in the ballpark is $20 -- 20 times what it used to cost to sit in Comiskey's old centerfield bleachers. I'll probably end up spending about close to $30.

The most expensive seat in the park is $85. Like I'm going to pay $85 to see a baseball game in May. Granted, it's a great seat, but when I was a kid, I could scrape together $3.50.

doublem23
03-15-2008, 02:33 PM
The most expensive seat in the park is $85. Like I'm going to pay $85 to see a baseball game in May. Granted, it's a great seat, but when I was a kid, I could scrape together $3.50.

If people are willing to pay $85 for that seat, why would they offer it at a cheaper price? The cost explosion that's occurred in sports over the last 10-15 years is discouraging, but if people are still showing up at the gates in record numbers, I don't know if I can fault MLB for continuing to up the ante.

wealz07
03-15-2008, 03:18 PM
I think it is great many people are going to the ballpark, but I also worry that as I get older that I will eventually get priced out of game. I wonder what families will do thirty years from now because the price of baseball tickets is increasing faster than the average person's raise of 2%.

I hear what you're saying, but ... MLB has never been more available to the fans. You can spend what less than $200 a year and have tv access to over 90% of the games played in an entire season. Not too mention what the internet has done for the sport and the discussion of it.. I think the internet will be as instrumental in the growth of baseball going forward as radio was in the 40's, 50's, etc...

TDog
03-15-2008, 05:13 PM
If people are willing to pay $85 for that seat, why would they offer it at a cheaper price? The cost explosion that's occurred in sports over the last 10-15 years is discouraging, but if people are still showing up at the gates in record numbers, I don't know if I can fault MLB for continuing to up the ante.


I'm not saying they should offer it at a cheaper price, although if they did, there might be more kids who care about baseball as much as I do. But as much as I care about baseball, there is no way I would pay that kind of money to see a regular season game. A baseball game is the only sort of American sporting event I would ever pay to see, although I've paid more than $85for other sorts of entertainment.


If I were growing up today, I probably wouldn't care that much about baseball. But that's probably no concern of the people who price tickets.

Fenway
03-15-2008, 05:40 PM
I'm not saying they should offer it at a cheaper price, although if they did, there might be more kids who care about baseball as much as I do. But as much as I care about baseball, there is no way I would pay that kind of money to see a regular season game. A baseball game is the only sort of American sporting event I would ever pay to see, although I've paid more than $85for other sorts of entertainment.


If I were growing up today, I probably wouldn't care that much about baseball. But that's probably no concern of the people who price tickets.

When I was a kid going to a baseball game cost about the same as a movie ticket. My Dad or brother took me 10-15 times a year because I grew up 2 miles from the park. Hockey and basketball were on the average a dollar more a game because they only had half the openings.

Boston now is ridiculous but it is obvious why the park is scaled the way it is. The Red Sox can meet payroll just from ticket sales and everything else is profit.

Now a baseball game is priced like a concert or broadway show. A play or concert can be a lifetime memory but most games are not.

Sooner or later the market will correct.

turners56
03-15-2008, 07:20 PM
The ticket price thing is probably because EVERYTHING IS BECOMING EXPENSIVE. Might be just me, but it does seem so. Or it might be the $50 tank of gas that goes in the car every week.

asg2003ws2005
03-16-2008, 05:46 AM
Yeah, the cubs can sell 2.75 million tickets, but most of those are sold for the express purpose of resale. lotta amateur scalpers out there hoping to make a big buck off the lovable losers.

also, it wasnt pointed out that the yankees have A LOT of promotional dates, and discounted ticket offers.

Fenway
03-16-2008, 06:37 AM
also, it wasnt pointed out that the yankees have A LOT of promotional dates, and discounted ticket offers.

Something NOT true for the Red Sox

free magnetic schedules on Opening Day...and that is it for promotions

bigfoot
03-16-2008, 07:21 AM
When I came of age as a Sox fan, the most expensive seat in the park cost $3.50. My mother was a teacher with a couple of years of experience, and one of the best players on the Sox, Carlos May, was paid about twice what she was.

This year, on Carlos May's 60th birthday, I'm hoping to see the Sox in San Francisco. I checked the availability of tickets last night and found tickets in every price range. But the cheapest ticket in the ballpark is $20 -- 20 times what it used to cost to sit in Comiskey's old centerfield bleachers. I'll probably end up spending about close to $30.

The most expensive seat in the park is $85. Like I'm going to pay $85 to see a baseball game in May. Granted, it's a great seat, but when I was a kid, I could scrape together $3.50.

TDog, when you and I were growing up going to a MLB game was a rare treat. Not relying upon others to play the games, we went to a local sandlot with a few friends and put together a pick-up game. Now that we no longer have empty lots available or accessability to those that still remain(just a couple of excuses), "attending an MLB game" is what we consider a sporting event. The cost is significant, only when compared to the recent decline in the purchasing power of the almighty $. The total cost of you to go to a Giants/A's game must now include the drive from Modesto and back, parking, and other sundries that may be included for the day/night. 20X the price of a ticket...that might make gasoline $6/gal today, though in real terms, it would be close......or just wait a few more months.

Not a small personal outlay of $$ to be sure, but please include the overall valuation of the teams vs the salaries of players when making such comparisions. Had Carlos May been playing in the free agent era, he probably wouldn't have been a postal worker(IIRC) later in life. Not that the USPS is a bad gig, still John Olerud probably won't be selling stamps anytime soon.

If one were to include the level of comfort afforded at the new Giants Park(what ever the name), it is a great deal nicer than "The 'Stick". The cost of the MLB "experience" approaches bang for the buck. Don't you think?

Though I could be wrong. :wink:

Oblong
03-16-2008, 09:45 AM
What was the price of a movie ticket or a can of soda in 1960? Everything's gone up and will continue to go up. I used to be able to take a date to dinner/movie for like $40. Now it'd be $80 minimum. Just 10 years ago my season seats at Tiger Stadium were in the upper deck and cost $9 a game. Now that seat doesn't even exist because the upper deck hung over the lower deck. My current second row seat would be near the back wall and costs $19 after a season ticket discount.

Yes, Carlos May only made twice what a school teacher made but that wasn't because of the ticket prices. It was because the owner kept the rest of the money and didn't have to pay May what he was probably really worth in an open market. Don't kid yourself. The ticket prices we pay today are not because of salaries. Players could make $100K a year and we'd be paying what we currently pay. It's based on what the public's willing to shell out, not what the costs are.

itsnotrequired
03-16-2008, 10:10 AM
Other items of interest regarding Yankee box seat pricing:

The longest stretch without an increase was from 1968-1975 where the price remained $4.00
In the last decade alone, the cost of a box seat has increased 332 percent, accounting for inflation.
The cost of a ticket in 1987 ($10) was less than what a ticket cost in 1967, when accounting for inflation ($12.28)
From 1967 to 1994 (27 years), the cost for a box seat was under $20.
The cost for a box seat from 1994 was under $30 for only 2 years (1995-1996), $40 for one year (1997),$50 for one year (1998)
The largest percentage of price increase is from last year to this: $100.http://www.bizofbaseball.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2003&Itemid=42

Taliesinrk
03-16-2008, 12:04 PM
I agree that it's a free market - if the demand is there, I don't blame MLB. As previously alluded to in the thread, however, the most disturbing thing about the situation is that normal kids suffer from the increase. It's not like 30-40 years ago when a couple friends could save for a month and scrap together enough cash to get into the park and see a game together.

TDog
03-16-2008, 01:13 PM
TDog, when you and I were growing up going to a MLB game was a rare treat. Not relying upon others to play the games, we went to a local sandlot with a few friends and put together a pick-up game. Now that we no longer have empty lots available or accessability to those that still remain(just a couple of excuses), "attending an MLB game" is what we consider a sporting event. The cost is significant, only when compared to the recent decline in the purchasing power of the almighty $. The total cost of you to go to a Giants/A's game must now include the drive from Modesto and back, parking, and other sundries that may be included for the day/night. 20X the price of a ticket...that might make gasoline $6/gal today, though in real terms, it would be close......or just wait a few more months.

Not a small personal outlay of $$ to be sure, but please include the overall valuation of the teams vs the salaries of players when making such comparisions. Had Carlos May been playing in the free agent era, he probably wouldn't have been a postal worker(IIRC) later in life. Not that the USPS is a bad gig, still John Olerud probably won't be selling stamps anytime soon.

If one were to include the level of comfort afforded at the new Giants Park(what ever the name), it is a great deal nicer than "The 'Stick". The cost of the MLB "experience" approaches bang for the buck. Don't you think?

Though I could be wrong. :wink:

You're right about the sandlot thing, and I find it disturbing that that church yard at White Oak and Fran-Lin in Munster where I learned the sweet thrill of hitting a baseball just right is no longer has a baseball backstop. I rarely see kids playing baseball anymore. Before I started having to work during the summer, I spent the entire day playing ball. In high school, in the less inclement spring and fall, it was baseball after school. In those days, given the choice between going to a Sox game and playing ball, we would rather have watched. The fact that now it is the latter has nothing to do with the cost. I love baseball so much that I would pay more to play it than watch it.

General admission at Old Comiskey was comparable in expense to going to a movie. It wasn't the money, so much as finding someone old enough to drive with the time to take us to the park. When I reached driving age, until college downstate got in the way, I got a Sunday season ticket plan. With a few additional special dates thrown in, I think it came out to $125 for the package.

I've never calculated the cost of the gas to Dublin/Pleasanton to catch the BART for baseball. I think Oakland is a $7-something train ride. San Francisco is more because it's a longer BART ride and the Muni connection is a couple dollars more. That doesn't compare to what I would have to pay to park. Figure in $25-$30 for a seat in the rafters and it's still not a potentially everyday experience that baseball used to be. If you're talking about a prime seat, you're getting, as Fenway noted, in Broadway show territory -- and I think he made an apt analogy. I have only driven past Candlestick, but I can tell you the only difference in comfort (weather permitting) between the upper deck at the Cell and the upper deck in San Francisco is the view of the neighborhood.

Baseball still may be more affordable than other sports, but there is no way kids today can feel as close to the players as I used to. It isn't just that we read about their salaries, but the cost of seeing them at the ballpark has increased dramatically, even taking inflation into account. I don't see the bang for the buck.

I have had the opportunity to meet Carlos May, and he is as great a guy as I imagined he was when I was at the ballpark every Sunday watching him hit .307 with the 1972 White Sox. And he is still working for the post office.

Hitmenof77
03-16-2008, 01:21 PM
Though there are many more people living in the United States than in 1955, the entertainment options available today are much greater than in the 50s. Baseball can be watched in high definition on a plasma screen, but people are going out to the ballpark in record numbers.

Guess you didn't read the population report correctly.

Fenway
03-16-2008, 01:58 PM
Back in 1983 I took a Chicago friend to a White Sox game at Fenway. That morning I took him out to Belmont Center where one of his heroes was working at a small fish market he owned - Wilbur Wood.
Wilbur was making the clam chowder when we arrived.

The price jump the past 12 years at Fenway is staggering

Here are the 1996 prices and 2008

Field Box 18 - 125
Loge Box 16 - 90
Grandstand 12 - 50
RF Box 12 - 50
OF Gandstand 9 - 30
Bleachers 8 - 26
Upper Bleachers 5 - 12
Standing Room 7 - 20 or 25

Then the new seats
HP Pavilion 215
Club 165
Coca Cola 85
RF tables 110 (must buy 4 includes 25 food voucher)
Monster 140 125 90

spiffie
03-16-2008, 07:40 PM
What was the price of a movie ticket or a can of soda in 1960? Everything's gone up and will continue to go up. I used to be able to take a date to dinner/movie for like $40. Now it'd be $80 minimum. Just 10 years ago my season seats at Tiger Stadium were in the upper deck and cost $9 a game. Now that seat doesn't even exist because the upper deck hung over the lower deck. My current second row seat would be near the back wall and costs $19 after a season ticket discount.

Yes, Carlos May only made twice what a school teacher made but that wasn't because of the ticket prices. It was because the owner kept the rest of the money and didn't have to pay May what he was probably really worth in an open market. Don't kid yourself. The ticket prices we pay today are not because of salaries. Players could make $100K a year and we'd be paying what we currently pay. It's based on what the public's willing to shell out, not what the costs are.
According to boxofficemojo.com the price of a movie ticket on average in 1959 was $0.51. In 2007 it was $6.82. An increase of 1,337% over those 48 years. My opening day tix in Sec. 512 for this year are $31. By that rate of inflation it would have been $2.31 back in 1959.

Fenway
03-16-2008, 08:18 PM
In 1982 the White Sox had the highest priced ticket in MLB when they renovated the upper deck and called the first rows Golden Boxes and I think they were a whopping $9 a game.

They spent a fortune on Comiskey that year and were the second team to have a color replay board (Dodgers had done so the previous year )

We grabbed the golden boxes as often as we could...they were worth the extra 2 bucks.

LoveYourSuit
03-16-2008, 10:38 PM
In 1982 the White Sox had the highest priced ticket in MLB when they renovated the upper deck and called the first rows Golden Boxes and I think they were a whopping $9 a game.

They spent a fortune on Comiskey that year and were the second team to have a color replay board (Dodgers had done so the previous year )

We grabbed the golden boxes as often as we could...they were worth the extra 2 bucks.


Golden Boxes were any of those seats enclosed by those annoying yellow bars right?

Never had the opportunity to sit there but my friends and I used to call those the Packer seats.

Elephant
03-16-2008, 10:46 PM
This is baseball's true golden age. In 1955, which was in the middle of the decade that baseball was considered by some to be in its prime, here are a few attendance numbers.

The new Milwaukee Braves were the only team to draw over two million; the Yankees had the second highest attendance at just below 1.5 million.
The Sox drew 1.17 Million
The Cubs drew 875,000
There were eight teams that had an attendance below one million fans.

Though there are many more people living in the United States than in 1955, the entertainment options available today are much greater than in the 50s. Baseball can be watched in high definition on a plasma screen, but people are going out to the ballpark in record numbers.

This has always been a cubs town. :rolleyes:

tony1972
03-18-2008, 02:55 PM
Just curious..how many have the White Sox sold? is it close to 2 million?