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StatManDu
02-29-2008, 01:50 AM
FEBRUARY 29TH

TEAM COMISKEY STAYS
1940: A judge made sure the White Sox would stay in the Comiskey family when he denied an attempt by a bank to sell the franchise. The First National Bank of Chicago, the club’s principal lender, tried to force a sale by the heirs of the late J. Louis Comiskey, the son of the team’s founder. A judge ruled in favor of the Comiskeys saying that Mrs. Grace Comiskey could keep the club for their 14-year-old son‚ Charles II‚ until he is 35. History tells us that Charles II never got the club. Grace wound up selling to Bill Veeck before the 1959 season.

ROBIN FOR TWO
1992: The White Sox and Robin Ventura agreed on a two-year contract. The deal extended through what would have been Ventura’s first year of arbitration.

PHILLIPS UNRETIRES
1996: Two days after suddenly retiring, White Sox left fielder Tony Phillips unretired and rejoined the club in spring training in Sarasota, Fla. Two days earlier, the Sox announced Phillips was retiring for family reasons. Upon his return, the Sox released a statement saying Phillips’ family problems had been resolved. Speculation had Phillips leaving the game because he felt unappreciated after having to take a $2.5 million paycut for 1996 despite a banner year with the Angels. General manager Ron Schueler said three of Phillips’ closest friends – including Dusty Baker and Dave Stewart – were able to persuade Phillips to return. It’s a good thing they did, too. Phillips went on to have one of the great seasons ever by a Sox leadoff hitter. Phillips hit .277 with a league-best 125 walks and a sensational .404 on-base percentage spearheading an attack that should have carried the White Sox to at least a wild card berth that year. In addition, Phillips played a stellar left field, leading the league with 345 putouts, 13 assists and three double plays.

Editor's Note: Information for these entries is gleaned from the author's files, retrosheet.org, various Internet sources, press reports of the day, White Sox media guides and the many White Sox books written by the great Rich Lindberg.

santo=dorf
02-29-2008, 02:01 AM
Question for munchman and others who buy into the theory that speed and stolen bases make pitchers spontaneous combust on the mound: How effective was Phillips as a leadoff hitter that year? He only had 13 stolen bases, 8 caught stealings, 132 K's, and 1 sac bunt. :scratch:

In fact if you look at his career, he was never a great stolen base threat and his success percentage was an ugly 61%.

StatManDu
02-29-2008, 12:32 PM
The offense that year was unbelievable with Frank, Robin and Tartabull all getting 100 RBIs or close to it. The fact that Phillips was on base over 300 times played a huge role in that

Corlose 15
02-29-2008, 02:16 PM
That was a good offensive team. Too bad there was nobody in the rotation besides Fernandez with an ERA under 4.

Check out the stats on baseball reference. Big Frank got on base 46% percent of the time that year!:shocked:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/CHW/1996.shtml

All the regulars except for Ozzie had at least a .320 OBP.

soxfan13
02-29-2008, 03:01 PM
That was a good offensive team. Too bad there was nobody in the rotation besides Fernandez with an ERA under 4.

Check out the stats on baseball reference. Big Frank got on base 46% percent of the time that year!:shocked:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/CHW/1996.shtml

All the regulars except for Ozzie had at least a .320 OBP.

fire him:tongue:

RadioheadRocks
03-02-2008, 03:47 AM
Let's not forget Bill Long's birthday (February 29, 1960). That would make him 12. :cool:

Brian26
03-02-2008, 09:10 AM
That was a good offensive team. Too bad there was nobody in the rotation besides Fernandez with an ERA under 4.

The bullpen was horrible too.

munchman33
03-02-2008, 11:32 AM
Question for munchman and others who buy into the theory that speed and stolen bases make pitchers spontaneous combust on the mound: How effective was Phillips as a leadoff hitter that year? He only had 13 stolen bases, 8 caught stealings, 132 K's, and 1 sac bunt. :scratch:

In fact if you look at his career, he was never a great stolen base threat and his success percentage was an ugly 61%.

You're talking about an extreme case where a guy got on base more than 40% of the time. That isn't fairly common. If you're not going to do that, you certainly need to have speed to make up for it.

santo=dorf
03-02-2008, 12:08 PM
You're talking about an extreme case where a guy got on base more than 40% of the time. That isn't fairly common. If you're not going to do that, you certainly need to have speed to make up for it.
What's your OBP cut off then? .375? .380?