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View Full Version : Blame the players ???


misty60481
01-01-2008, 07:33 AM
Looking at the steroid issue I was wondering what any one of us would have done. I know the big names--Bonds, Mac, Sheffield--will live with it, but put yourself in say Brady Andersons shoes. He knows he is just an average player making $500TH or so a year and has maybe 3 or 4 years left before he is thru and has to go into the real world and work for a living. Most average ballplayers have no other real skills so he is thrown in with us--truckdriver, factory worker,etc. The chance comes along and he gambles on it, hits the jackpot and has a tremendous year, all at once he has a $ 3M dollar contract and plays it out, his skills diminished but retires with an extra couple m illion in bank. Would you take the chance ?
Its a lot easier to go into the working world with a MIL in the bank than empty handed.

raven1
01-01-2008, 08:10 AM
Looking at the steroid issue I was wondering what any one of us would have done. I know the big names--Bonds, Mac, Sheffield--will live with it, but put yourself in say Brady Andersons shoes. He knows he is just an average player making $500TH or so a year and has maybe 3 or 4 years left before he is thru and has to go into the real world and work for a living. Most average ballplayers have no other real skills so he is thrown in with us--truckdriver, factory worker,etc. The chance comes along and he gambles on it, hits the jackpot and has a tremendous year, all at once he has a $ 3M dollar contract and plays it out, his skills diminished but retires with an extra couple m illion in bank. Would you take the chance ?
Its a lot easier to go into the working world with a MIL in the bank than empty handed.
No doubt the motivation was there, and the fact that at the time there were no rules against it or testing for it made it even more attractive. That's why there is such wide suspicion that steriod usage went well beyond the players named in the Mitchell report and was very widespread.

Still, wrong is wrong and those who used performance enhancing drugs essentially stole from the players who didn't. If I were given the opportunity to steal a million dollars from my employer in a situation where I probably wouldn't be caught, I think I would still have enough moral fortitude to avoid the temptation.

misty60481
01-01-2008, 08:19 AM
Lets put it like this, there are players that were average now retired that no doubt took something to make them better. Now that they are retired do you think any feel guilty about it ? A MIL $ extra is strong motivation.

raven1
01-01-2008, 08:32 AM
Lets put it like this, there are players that were average now retired that no doubt took something to make them better. Now that they are retired do you think any feel guilty about it ? A MIL $ extra is strong motivation.
Knowing that they cheated probably reduces the pride at least some of them feel in their accomplishments, plus they could be facing serious long-term health problems if they used extensively. In a lot of cases they no longer have most of the extra money they earned either.

Those who were motivated solely by money probably won't feel much remorse. However, given the amount of work and focus it takes to be a professional athlete I expect that many of them were driven more by a need to achieve. For those athletes, having what they committed the better part of their lives to accomplish tarnished will certainly hurt.

soxfanreggie
01-01-2008, 09:38 AM
Isn't it ridiculously easy to qualify for the MLB players' pension, which is something like a minimum of $30,000+ a year? I think I remember reading something that. I also think you can start collecting at a much earlier age than a normal pension.

From askmen.com: "An agreement in 1968 set the requirements to receive a pension after five years. But the 1981 strike reduced that time frame to 43 days [:mg: ]for a full pension and just one day for full medical benefits [:mg:]. I wish my current job would be like that."

Another excerpt: "Still considered the most generous of the four major sports, some athletes were earning six-figure pensions as far back as the 1980s. Cal Ripken Jr.'s expected pension when he reaches 62 will be $160,000 (in regards to 2004) annually for 21 seasons of play."

From another website (moneyplayers, as 0f 2007): "Larry Dierker, a former MLB pitcher, earned $125,000 in his best year. Two years from now, when Dierker turns 60, he will begin collecting $180,000 in annual retirement benefits."

Finally, from http://nflrpa.blogspot.com/: Average annual benefit of $36,700, average salary of $2.8 million, and median salary of $1.1 million. If your agent/financial planner/attorney/whatever you call your rep does not help you plan for your future when you're making a few hundred grand a year, you have serious problems and should consider getting someone who is truly looking out for both you and him/herself.

After taking a look at all this, if you're making $500k a year and have 3-4 years left, you're going to have a decent pension (probably $50-70k a year) and have made a decent amount of money. You also won't be making $500k a year for all of those years, that will probably go up. Thus, even after taxes and all other fees are paid to reps, you should still be pocketing around $250,000 or more a year. Put aside $50,000 a year in an annuity or even just a cd and collect interest on it. You'll have a great supplement to your pension. This doesn't even include card shows or any spokeman/advertising jobs you can get.