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View Full Version : White Sox one hit wonders who spent MORE than one year with the Sox


santo=dorf
11-30-2007, 04:46 PM
Here are the rules:
1. Player spent at least three years (do not have to be full seasons) in the White Sox organization OR signed with the White Sox as a major league free agent
2. Player was consistently mediocre or bad with the exception of one season with the Sox
3. Year can be considered a "contract," "fluke," "career" year or a year before a career ending injury.
4. DH position does not have to be filled by a dedicated DH
5. Keep the debate of whether or not the player is qualified to a minimum

I can only recall fluky years recently, but here's what I have so far:
C
1B
2B 2004 Juan Uribe
SS
3B 2006 Joe Crede
LF 2001 Jeff Liefer
CF 2004 Aaron Rowand
RF
DH
SP 2005 Jon Garland
SP 2003 Esteban Loaiza
SP 2000 Mike Sirotka
SP 2000 Jim Parque
SP
RP
RP
RP 2005 Neal Cotts
RP 2005 Cliff Politte
RP 2005 Dustin Hermanson
CL 2004 Shingo Takatsu

WhiteSoxJunkie
11-30-2007, 05:56 PM
05 Podsednik could also qualify for left field.

BRDSR
11-30-2007, 06:47 PM
If the deal is three years in the organization, I think Mike Caruso would be a solid shortstop for the list. He wasn't even that great for that one good year, but he did bat over .300, right?

32nd&Wallace
11-30-2007, 07:11 PM
Could we put Uribe over to SS and put the first half of 2003 of D'Angelo Jimenez at 2B.

Brian26
11-30-2007, 07:41 PM
This list is lame. Do some homework and pick some guys from the 70s and 80s.

Half the roster is from the '05 World Champions? :rolleyes:

You've got Garland listed as a one-hit wonder when he had two consecutive 18-win seasons? :rolleyes:

LITTLE NELL
11-30-2007, 07:42 PM
Sandy Consuegra went 16-3 in 1953
Bob Shaw went 18-6 in 1959
Ray Herbert went 20-9 in 1962
All 3 had mediocre careers except they all had one great year for the Sox.

Brian26
11-30-2007, 07:53 PM
Sandy Consuegra went 16-3 in 1953
Bob Shaw went 18-6 in 1959
Ray Herbert went 20-9 in 1962
All 3 had mediocre careers except they all had one great year for the Sox.

That's what I'm talking about.

santo=dorf
11-30-2007, 07:56 PM
This list is lame. Do some homework and pick some guys from the 70s and 80s.

Half the roster is from the '05 World Champions? :rolleyes:

You've got Garland listed as a one-hit wonder when he had two consecutive 18-win seasons? :rolleyes:
I already said I'm having a hard time evaluating from the past 10 years.

Using wins to evaluate a pitcher's performance. :rolleyes: Indeed.

Please explain how Cotts and Politte didn't peak in 2005?

How about Duane Josephson in 1970?

Brian26
11-30-2007, 08:02 PM
Using wins to evaluate a pitcher's performance. :rolleyes: Indeed.

Certainly two straight seasons of 18 wins in a bandbox is a sign of a mediocre pitcher.

santo=dorf
11-30-2007, 08:06 PM
Certainly two straight seasons of 18 wins in a bandbox is a sign of a mediocre pitcher.
It is when your ERA and WHIP is close to the league average.

Garland was a better pitcher in 2007 than 2006. How bout that?

Oh yeah, Dayn Perry tried to make the same argument about USCF, but over the past two seasons Garland has pitched better at home.

Do your homework

Brian26
11-30-2007, 08:11 PM
Do your homework

Check out Britt Burns 1985 season as an example that might work in your fictional list. You would have just turned two years old in August of that year.

:thumbsup:

Soxzilla
11-30-2007, 08:57 PM
I thought Juan had a pretty decent 2005 ... myself.

Hell, he made two amazing plays for the two final outs of our World Series Championship ... I'll always remember him more for that than his less-than-mediocre play during a period of time where our whole team has sucked.

nccwsfan
11-30-2007, 09:08 PM
SP 1990 Greg Hibbard
SP 1979 Ross Baumgarten
RP 1990 Barry Jones
RP 1985 Juan Agosto
RP 1980 Farmio

chisox77
11-30-2007, 10:42 PM
1977 - Jim Essian - catcher

Was with the White Sox from 1975-1977, and again in 1981 as a free agent acquisition. By far, 1977 was his best season in homers (11), RBI (44), and batting average (.278). During his major league career, Essian never came near these numbers again. In fact, he played so well that Brian Downing rode the bench much of that season, even though Downing had more talent and upside.

Downing was eventually traded to the Angels, and ejoyed a very good career as an outfielder (he played LF, and sometimes RF - solid athlete).


:cool:

BRDSR
11-30-2007, 11:25 PM
This list is lame. Do some homework and pick some guys from the 70s and 80s.


Oh, come on. No love for my Mike Caruso suggestion? I was only 12 years old for Mike Caruso's one hit wonder season. He batted .306, and that's from memory, baby! :cool:

He also hit 5 home runs that season, but I had to look that up. I was pretty surprised, I thought it was going to be one or two. The only home run I ever remember him hitting was in '99, the game winner against the Cubs at Wrigley. Describing the home run, he said "Well, there was a rain delay, I ate some steak, and then came out and hit the home run." (had to look that up, too).

I don't care if he was a one-hit wonder, that's funny as hell.

soxinem1
11-30-2007, 11:29 PM
SP 1990 Greg Hibbard
SP 1979 Ross Baumgarten
RP 1990 Barry Jones
RP 1985 Juan Agosto
RP 1980 Farmio

This is an excellent list.

I'd also include Bob James and Salome Barojas from that era.

How come Ron Santo is not on this list? It was a wonder he had any hits with the White Sox!!!!

soxrme
12-01-2007, 11:46 AM
BeeBee Richards
Harry Chappas
Kevin Bell (knee injury ruined what could have been a good career)

RhubarbStew
12-01-2007, 01:27 PM
John Cangelosi

WhiteSoxJunkie
12-01-2007, 01:57 PM
How about 1999 Chris Singleton. He hit .300 with 17 HRs, 72 RBIs, and 31 doubles while finishing 6th in Rookie of the Year voting.

HomeFish
12-01-2007, 09:16 PM
The Milkman had a better year in 2000 than Crede ever has.

A. Cavatica
12-01-2007, 09:43 PM
Who would manage this team?

rdivaldi
12-01-2007, 10:00 PM
The Milkman had a better year in 2000 than Crede ever has.

:?:

I don't think anyone in their right mind would say it was anywhere near as good as Crede's 2006 season. Not to mention that Perry's defense was no where in the same universe.

I'll take Crede's 2005 season as well. You know, the one where he had all of those big hits in the postseason?

nccwsfan
12-01-2007, 10:02 PM
The best one hit wonder I can think of is the 2000 version of Jerry Manuel. 1977 Bob Lemon coached for 1 1/2 years with the White Sox, but he had success with the Yankees, even if it were on an interim basis.

sullythered
12-01-2007, 10:22 PM
I don't care what the numbers say, Uribe had a better '05 than '04. Several HUGE plays down the stretch and in the playoffs. Jon Garland has basically been the same pitcher for the last three seasons. As far as Crede goes, nobody who consistently plays gold glove caliber third base should be considered a "one hit wonder." Rowand had a pretty nice '05, and has been consistently good with the Phillies. Jeff Liefer was crappy in '01, too.

106 years of White Sox baseball, and nobody before 2000?:?:

PalehosePlanet
12-02-2007, 12:05 AM
Check out Britt Burns 1985 season as an example that might work in your fictional list. You would have just turned two years old in August of that year.

:thumbsup:

Not a chance! Britt Burns was an all-star in '80 with 15 wins and a 2.84 ERA on a bad team. He also had a 2.84 ERA in '81. If not for a degenerative hip disorder that forced him to retire at the age of 26 he would probably have a statue in the outfield concourse.

Soxfest
12-02-2007, 12:54 AM
John Cangelosi stole 50 bases in rookie year and did nothing after that.

santo=dorf
12-02-2007, 03:38 AM
I don't care what the numbers say, Uribe had a better '05 than '04. Several HUGE plays down the stretch and in the playoffs. Jon Garland has basically been the same pitcher for the last three seasons. As far as Crede goes, nobody who consistently plays gold glove caliber third base should be considered a "one hit wonder." Rowand had a pretty nice '05, and has been consistently good with the Phillies. Jeff Liefer was crappy in '01, too.

106 years of White Sox baseball, and nobody before 2000?:?:
Liefer had 18 homers in 254 at-bats. His SLG% was .520. Just look at the love he was getting by some in early 2002 (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=6551&highlight=Liefer). (Includes a scary remark from PHG about Borchard.)

Free agency hasn't been around for 106 years, and players are much more replacable these days.

Nellie_Fox
12-02-2007, 03:44 AM
BeeBee RichardsIt's Richard, not Richards, and I'd be interested to know what year you thought was good. The most at-bats he had, by far, was in '71, and he hit .231 with an OPS of .590. His fielding % that year at shortstop was .920. He was flat-out awful every year, so no way was he a "one-hit wonder."

sullythered
12-02-2007, 03:50 AM
Liefer had 18 homers in 254 at-bats. His SLG% was .520. Just look at the love he was getting by some in early 2002 (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=6551&highlight=Liefer). (Includes a scary remark from PHG about Borchard.)

Free agency hasn't been around for 106 years, and players are much more replacable these days.
Okay, I'll give you Liefer as a decent prospect back then. But free agency has been around for longer than 7 years.

TommyJohn
12-02-2007, 09:54 AM
Not a chance! Britt Burns was an all-star in '80 with 15 wins and a 2.84 ERA on a bad team. He also had a 2.84 ERA in '81. If not for a degenerative hip disorder that forced him to retire at the age of 26 he would probably have a statue in the outfield concourse.

Umm, not quite. He was traded before the 1986 season to the Yankees for
the great Ron Hassey, who was sent back to the Yankees before the season
after Burns retired, then went to the White Sox midway through the 1986
season anyway.

eastchicagosoxfan
12-02-2007, 12:04 PM
Ron Kittle? His rookie season was fantastic. But he also set career highs in HR, hits, RBI's, runs, games, and total bases. His ten year career was essentially downhill from there. In 1989, he hit pretty well, but was only in 51 games. Kittle didn't suck, far from it, but he his one great season was 1983.

gobears1987
12-02-2007, 03:52 PM
The list in the first post really sucks.

How are half of those people one hit wonders?

gobears1987
12-02-2007, 03:55 PM
Would Bobby Thigpen classify as a 1 hit wonder? I know that injuries got to him as he was overused in his record setting year.

gobears1987
12-02-2007, 03:55 PM
Ron Kittle? His rookie season was fantastic. But he also set career highs in HR, hits, RBI's, runs, games, and total bases. His ten year career was essentially downhill from there. In 1989, he hit pretty well, but was only in 51 games. Kittle didn't suck, far from it, but he his one great season was 1983.
Kittle's problem was that his knees were always giving him issues.

santo=dorf
12-02-2007, 04:13 PM
The list in the first post really sucks.

How are half of those people one hit wonders?
I'll buy the argument of Rowand and Garland, but the other refuse to sway me one way or another. The 2004 Juan Uribe makes the same plays as the 2005 Juan Uribe.

Cotts = 1 good year
Politte = 1 good year
Crede = 1 good year (2006)

Brian26
12-02-2007, 06:24 PM
The Milkman had a better year in 2000 than Crede ever has.

Unless you inadvertently left the teal off, that's one of the biggest troll comments I've ever seen posted here.

:dtroll: x 24 (for Crede's #)

Brian26
12-02-2007, 06:27 PM
Liefer had 18 homers in 254 at-bats. His SLG% was .520. Just look at the love he was getting by some in early 2002 (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=6551&highlight=Liefer). (Includes a scary remark from PHG about Borchard.)

Hooray. Dorf gets to play 20/20 hindsight on messages from six years ago.

Everybody on this board has made a comment that looks stupid in retrospect, myself included many times.

Brian26
12-02-2007, 06:31 PM
The list in the first post really sucks.

How are half of those people one hit wonders?

The lame part is that someone is going out of their way to piss on the memory of the '05 World Champions a mere two years removed from that feat. Dorf loses all credibility when he can't answer the question as to why Garland would be a one year wonder when he had back-to-back 18-win seasons, an accomplishment that many very good pitchers don't accomplish in their career.

ilsox7
12-02-2007, 06:32 PM
Kittle's problem was that his knees were always giving him issues.

It was Kitty's back that gave him the most problems, not his knees.

santo=dorf
12-02-2007, 06:39 PM
Hooray. Dorf gets to play 20/20 hindsight on messages from six years ago.

Everybody on this board has made a comment that looks stupid in retrospect, myself included many times.
It was a funny comment that I stumbled across. It's not like I went out of my way like you do to try and prove Otis' credibility.
The lame part is that someone is going out of their way to piss on the memory of the '05 World Champions a mere two years removed from that feat. Dorf loses all credibility when he can't answer the question as to why Garland would be a one year wonder when he had back-to-back 18-win seasons, an accomplishment that many very good pitchers don't accomplish in their career.
Win totals for a pitchers mean little. I am not try to piss on the 2005 championship because most Sox fans can accept Cotts and Politte pitched WAY over their heads in 2005. Politte put up one of the best seasons for a middle reliever, period. Cliff Freakin' Politte!

Brian26
12-02-2007, 06:40 PM
Cotts = 1 good year
Politte = 1 good year
Crede = 1 good year (2006)

I can give you a a mile-long list of middle relievers who have had one good year with the White Sox.

I'd have a hard time naming more than five Sox middle relievers in the last 35 years that have put together several very good years.

My point: judging middle relievers is a waste of time. The Sox struck gold with a championship bullpen in 2005, but I'd guess all 30 GM's in baseball would admit that finding consistently good middle relievers is a crap shoot at best.

Brian26
12-02-2007, 06:43 PM
It was a funny comment that I stumbled across. It's not like I went out of my way like you do to try and prove Otis' credibility.

What does Otis have to do with this thread? I haven't quoted Otis here in any form to disspell your ignorant hypothesis that Jon Garland is a "one year wonder."

If six+ seasons of 190 IPs and back-to-back 18-win seasons is a "one year wonder", I'd love to see what the hell you think a hall-of-famer is.

Brian26
12-02-2007, 06:49 PM
Win totals for a pitchers mean little.

The context of this statement should be considered in the argument.

Win totals mean less than ERA and WHIP for good pitchers on very bad teams that don't provide run support.

Jon Garland in 2005 and 2006 was a good pitcher on two very good teams (99 wins and 90 wins, lots of offense). Don't try to negate 36 victories over the course of two years. That's a nice accomplishment, and certainly not indicative of a "one-year-wonder."

I am not try to piss on the 2005 championship because most Sox fans can accept Cotts and Politte pitched WAY over their heads in 2005. Politte put up one of the best seasons for a middle reliever, period. Cliff Freakin' Politte!

Nobody is debating you about Cotts and Politte, other than the fact that you could easily name 30 other relievers that could be on that list. (Barry Jones 1990, Neil Allen 1985, Bob James '86, ...)

PalehosePlanet
12-02-2007, 08:24 PM
Umm, not quite. He was traded before the 1986 season to the Yankees for
the great Ron Hassey, who was sent back to the Yankees before the season
after Burns retired, then went to the White Sox midway through the 1986
season anyway.

Umm, YES quite. He was only traded because we and The Yankees knew that he would never pitch again. The Yankees liked him so much that they were willing to hope for a miracle. Obviously there was no miracle, and he never even put on a Yankee uniform.

TommyJohn
12-02-2007, 08:27 PM
Umm, YES quite. He was only traded because we and The Yankees knew that he would never pitch again. The Yankees liked him so much that they were willing to hope for a miracle. Obviously there was no miracle, and he never even put on a Yankee uniform.

My point is he WAS traded before he was forced to retire. Either way,
saying that there would be a statue of him if he hadn't gotten hurt is
stretching it. A lot.

PalehosePlanet
12-02-2007, 08:48 PM
My point is he WAS traded before he was forced to retire. Either way,
saying that there would be a statue of him if he hadn't gotten hurt is
stretching it. A lot.

Obviously it might be stretching it. But if he hadn't already been feeling the effects of his bad hip at age 23, and if his numbers proir to that were any indication of his talent before he starting hurting, chances are he could have had a marvelous career. He certainly had the talent.

Brian26
12-02-2007, 08:53 PM
Obviously it might be stretching it. But if he hadn't already been feeling the effects of his bad hip at age 23, and if his numbers proir to that were any indication of his talent before he starting hurting, chances are he could have had a marvelous career.

If I could throw a curve ball over the plate, pitch about 40 mph faster and throw from the left side, along with a little luck, I have no doubt I would have a statue at the Cell next to Billy Pierce too.

Or at least have as many major league wins as Jim Parque.

:nod: