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View Full Version : 1st and 3rd base coaches will wear helmets


Sockinchisox
11-08-2007, 11:45 AM
In light of what happened to Mike Coolbaugh, GMs have decided to make it mandatory that 1st and 3rd base coaches wear helmets from now on.

http://www.nbcsports.com/portal/site/nbcsports/menuitem.6f806e473b4cb158fb00ec22493c2d04/?vgnextoid=cef0ec1f90026110VgnVCM10000075c1d240RCR D

mrfourni
11-08-2007, 11:47 AM
I don't disagree with the move, but how long now until pitchers and 1st and 3rd basemen start wearing helmets?

Pitchers especially, they're closer to the batters box than anyone already not wearing a helmet.

TDog
11-08-2007, 11:59 AM
I don't disagree with the move, but how long now until pitchers and 1st and 3rd basemen start wearing helmets?

Pitchers especially, they're closer to the batters box than anyone already not wearing a helmet.


When I was in high school, the Sox had a first baseman who wore a helmet on defense.

veeter
11-08-2007, 12:04 PM
Although I think the Coolbaugh death was a freak accident, it's probably a good move.

ohiosoxfan
11-08-2007, 12:28 PM
The difference between the coaches and the 3rd, 1st baseman and pitcher is that a lot of times, the coaches don't have their eyes on home plate, their attention is focused on the runners or the pitcher's pick off move, so they don't have as much time to react as the fielders do. I believe this was the case in the Coolbaugh incident.

WhiteSox5187
11-08-2007, 12:56 PM
When I was in high school, the Sox had a first baseman who wore a helmet on defense.
Dick Allen?

I agree that Coolbaugh's death was probably a freak occurence, but it's better to be safe than sorry...I think with the players it's up to their discretion, John Olereud for example, always wore a helmet on defense. As did Dick Allen, although that wasn't out of fear of being hit in the head with a line shot.

Oblong
11-08-2007, 01:17 PM
To be honest, I'm surprised something like that hasn't happened already at the ML level. Considering all the times we see shots down the line and in the dugout, these accidents are pretty rare. Didn't a coach in Baltimore get hit in the head back in the mid 90s?

thomas35forever
11-08-2007, 01:59 PM
I can't disagree with this move, especially since the loss of a human life motivated them to do this. This probably should have happened a long time ago.

Hokiesox
11-08-2007, 02:18 PM
The biggest difference is First and third basemen have gloves. They have a means to protect themselves. Pitchers too, but they're usually on a follow through and tend to get drilled without notice. Coaches have no such means to protect themselves, and as previously stated, they're not generally paying attention to the result of the pitch.

Good move by MLB, though I'm not sure how it would prevent the injury Coolbaugh sustained. Is the coach supposed to duck his head now? A helmet isn't going to protect the coaches neck.

PKalltheway
11-08-2007, 02:38 PM
Good idea by MLB. Wearing helmets won't hurt. Besides, IIRC, I saw the Rockies' first base coach Glenallen Hill wearing one during the postseason.

goofymsfan
11-08-2007, 02:41 PM
Good idea by MLB. Wearing helmets won't hurt. Besides, IIRC, I saw the Rockies' first base coach Glenallen Hill wearing one during the postseason.

He started wearing it right after the incident with their minor league coach. This was brought up during the stadium tour I went on when I was there in August. It may take some of the coaches some getting used to, but I don't see a draw back in them being required to wear a protective helmet. I remember in little league, 1st and 3rd base coaches needed to wear a helmet. I remember being hit a number of times in the arms and legs and wished padding was also required.

TomC727
11-08-2007, 03:05 PM
I may be in the minority here but I don't really support this. The coach was struck in the neck by the foul ball and died immediately. A helmet wouldn't have mattered.

Red Barchetta
11-08-2007, 04:38 PM
It will be interesting to see this. Personally, I don't think it will make much of a difference, however most coaches are well past their prime physically and their reflexes are not close to the reflexes of prime infielders and pitchers wearing gloves.

I think the Rockies Minor League coach incident was a complete freak accident, especially when you consider how many foul balls have been hit in MLB and minor league history.

Personally, I think the lower box fans are in more danger. At least the coaches are or should be paying attention to every pitch. Can't say that happens in the stands.

SaltyPretzel
11-08-2007, 04:43 PM
Personally, I think the lower box fans are in more danger. At least the coaches are or should be paying attention to every pitch. Can't say that happens in the stands.

This may open a can of worms. If coaches are required to wear helmets, some fan who gets hit by a liner is going to sue saying that they didn't have enough protection. Then we're going to see netting like the NHL. :(:

Noneck
11-08-2007, 08:19 PM
It's to protect the coaches and MLB in case of injury. I see no problem with it.

It is also a good time to enact a rule that base runners can not flip off their helmets while running the base paths. If the umps feel they intentionally took off their helmet while running the base paths, they would be called out and maybe even suspended.

Red Barchetta
11-08-2007, 10:17 PM
It's to protect the coaches and MLB in case of injury. I see no problem with it.

It is also a good time to enact a rule that base runners can not flip off their helmets while running the base paths. If the umps feel they intentionally took off their helmet while running the base paths, they would be called out and maybe even suspended.


...and thus, the Gary Matthews comeback ends. :D:

Red Barchetta
11-08-2007, 10:20 PM
This may open a can of worms. If coaches are required to wear helmets, some fan who gets hit by a liner is going to sue saying that they didn't have enough protection. Then we're going to see netting like the NHL. :(:

Especially with these newer, retro, quirkier ballparks. One of the newer parks (Petco?) has baseline seats that stick out and come close to facing the batter.

ChiSoxFan35
11-08-2007, 10:31 PM
Won't kill them to do it, might if they don't, no problems here

WLL1855
11-08-2007, 11:52 PM
Good move by MLB, though I'm not sure how it would prevent the injury Coolbaugh sustained. Is the coach supposed to duck his head now? A helmet isn't going to protect the coaches neck.

I'm absolutely positive that I'm in the minority on this but this is a knee jerk reaction to a completely freak accident. What's next? Make the batters wear a cage on their helmets like the softball players do? Make pitchers wear a catcher's mask and helmet so they can't have a Herb Score type injury? No matter what steps MLB decides, you cannot take all the risk out of the game of baseball. I'm not against a base coach voluntarily wearing a helmet, but I think mandating it goes a step too far.

Nellie_Fox
11-08-2007, 11:57 PM
When I was in high school, the Sox had a first baseman who wore a helmet on defense.Dick Allen started wearing the helmet in the field when he was in Philadelphia as protection against the fans throwing stuff at him.

It is also a good time to enact a rule that base runners can not flip off their helmets while running the base paths. If the umps feel they intentionally took off their helmet while running the base paths, they would be called out and maybe even suspended.Are you referring to Manny? If he can't keep his helmet on because of his hair and babushka, he should have to wear a chin strap like a little leaguer.

Etownsox13
11-09-2007, 01:16 AM
How about enforcing the rules, and making the coaches stay in the boxes. Watch the base coaches during a major league game, the draw coaches boxes are just decoration.

Noneck
11-09-2007, 06:46 AM
Are you referring to Manny? If he can't keep his helmet on because of his hair and babushka, he should have to wear a chin strap like a little leaguer.

Yes I was and thats an excellent idea.

manders_01
11-09-2007, 09:40 AM
It's to protect the coaches and MLB in case of injury. I see no problem with it.

It is also a good time to enact a rule that base runners can not flip off their helmets while running the base paths. If the umps feel they intentionally took off their helmet while running the base paths, they would be called out and maybe even suspended.

Watching that during the World Series seriously ticked me off. I was waiting for a infielder to be chargin a ball and trip over it. I didn't think it was right that he was able to flip his helmet off - or anyone else that would do that.

TDog
11-09-2007, 11:37 AM
Dick Allen started wearing the helmet in the field when he was in Philadelphia as protection against the fans throwing stuff at him. ....

I wasn't sure if it was Philadelphia or Little Rock, where he was treated worse than Philadelphia, but I never thought it created any problems. Of course, he wore a helmet withour ear flaps. It's the ear flaps that makes wearing a helmet uncomfortable.

TDog
11-09-2007, 12:20 PM
This may open a can of worms. If coaches are required to wear helmets, some fan who gets hit by a liner is going to sue saying that they didn't have enough protection. Then we're going to see netting like the NHL. :(:

At the risk of digging into that open can ...

Actually, there is a history of case law involving fans suing over being struck, sometimes fatally, by baseballs and hockey pucks. I was assigned to write a research paper on the topic this summer. Tort litigation is about duty and breach of duty. The latest California hockey case I found that reached the appeallate level was from 2002, where the Court of Appeal found the Los Angeles Kings owed no duty to protect spectators from the inherent risk of pucks flipped in the stands. In California, the baseball cases go back to 1935 in a case where the state Supreme Court ultimately said the injured woman assumed the risk of injury in San Francisco by choosing to sit in an area that was unprotected by the screen behind home plate.

Most cases are dismissed on summary judgment unless a new legal theory is presented. In 1997, a man won a lawsuit against the California League and the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes because when he was struck by the foul ball, he was distracted by the tail of the team mascot. Similar circumstances in a 2006 Connecticut case, however, failed to overcome the injured spectator's assumption of risk.

Assumption of risk is the major legal doctrine. When you're talking about people employed by the the teams or league, however, you're also getting into labor and insurance issues.

skottyj242
11-09-2007, 12:47 PM
When is there going to be netting to protect the batter on deck thus taking up more valuable foul territory?

thegooch
11-09-2007, 01:04 PM
Are they going to have a choice between a one-flap and two flap(ala Willie McGee) type helmet? I never trust a MLB player with the dual flaps.

All kidding aside, I think it's probably a good move.

skottyj242
11-09-2007, 01:16 PM
Are they going to have a choice between a one-flap and two flap(ala Willie McGee) type helmet? I never trust a MLB player with the dual flaps.

All kidding aside, I think it's probably a good move.

Willie Harris rules my face.