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A.T. Money
09-25-2007, 07:54 PM
I've always been obsessed with how cool our scoreboard is. I remember that in the 80s, when someone would hit a homerun, the racing lights would start at the bottom, and work its way towards the top, and circle around the circle at the top and then light up the pinwheels. Now, and I know it has been this way since the new place opened, just lights up like someone flipped a switch. The old scoreboard was capable of just turning on as well during 7th inning stretch, but I noticed something interesting.....

This year during the Thunderstruck intros, they show our scoreboard on the video loading up the way the old one used to, from the bottom to the top. But yet, we don't do it that way. And why not? Why not make it authentic like it used to be?

Is this something we can bug Brooks Boyer about? I remember as a kid getting scared watching that thing load up knowing the big booms were coming. My dad said I used used to scream...."oh no!" and hold my ears! LOL.

skobabe8
09-25-2007, 09:24 PM
I've always been obsessed with how cool our scoreboard is. I remember that in the 80s, when someone would hit a homerun, the racing lights would start at the bottom, and work its way towards the top, and circle around the circle at the top and then light up the pinwheels. Now, and I know it has been this way since the new place opened, just lights up like someone flipped a switch. The old scoreboard was capable of just turning on as well during 7th inning stretch, but I noticed something interesting.....

This year during the Thunderstruck intros, they show our scoreboard on the video loading up the way the old one used to, from the bottom to the top. But yet, we don't do it that way. And why not? Why not make it authentic like it used to be?

Is this something we can bug Brooks Boyer about? I remember as a kid getting scared watching that thing load up knowing the big booms were coming. My dad said I used used to scream...."oh no!" and hold my ears! LOL.

YES! I rememebr the same thing when I was a kid. I used to love how the lights worked their way to the top and then the fireworks would follow. I never thought to bring it up because it was such a small little gripe I had, but I always wish they would do this again. I have never noticed it during thunderstruck.

tebman
09-25-2007, 09:24 PM
This subject has come up before with similar questions. Hangar18 used to demand to know why the new park's board has one less pinwheel than did the board in the old park.

Bill Veeck's original board was truly nuts: the lights came up as you described, racing in and out along the bottom, with the lights on the mortars sticking out of the top coming on in sequence and then chasing up and down independent of each other while lights around the big clock on the top ran around in both directions in varying patterns. There were also scattered strobe lights on the face of the board that popped randomly like flashbulbs, and roman candles spit colored sparks from the top of the mortars before the big fireworks exploded behind it. The bulbs used at the bottom and around the clock were extra bright -- they were 150W floodlight lamps like you'd use in your backyard.

It was also supported by LOUD and goofy sound effects (dive bombers, the Hallelujah Chorus, trumpets, etc.). Look at an old picture of Comiskey Park and note the array of loudspeakers mounted in front of the board.

I've long wondered why, with technology much further advanced than it was in 1960 when Veeck's original board was built, the current board is so tasteful and benign. Veeck's inspiration was from a pinball machine blowing its top over a high score. Pinball machines (and video games and sports broadcasts for that matter) are not tasteful things. Why so afraid of being goofy and in-your-face with the home run celebration? I don't get it.

Lip Man 1
09-25-2007, 09:27 PM
You want to hear the old scoreboard?

Simply click on any of the links that say LET ME HEAR IT from this audio interactive piece on the Sox of the 1960's!!!!!

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=14&id=2241

Lip

A.T. Money
09-25-2007, 10:36 PM
OK I found the closest thing to what I'm talking about in the intros.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=peE9WdF-2QI

Let it download, and scan to about 3:01. You'll see the electric charges and they show it in the background...it's not easy to see you can just make it out, but it loads up 3 times right before they show Konerko at around 3:18.

paciorek1983
09-26-2007, 03:21 PM
.

I've long wondered why, with technology much further advanced than it was in 1960 when Veeck's original board was built, the current board is so tasteful and benign. Veeck's inspiration was from a pinball machine blowing its top over a high score. Pinball machines (and video games and sports broadcasts for that matter) are not tasteful things. Why so afraid of being goofy and in-your-face with the home run celebration? I don't get it.

Yeah, you'd think with the technology we have today, we could have something better.

Hopefully they'll replace the board over the next few years. It's nearly out-dated. I'd have to think that they could do something with LED? LED seems to be so flexible that they could replace the out of town board and the message board in left and put all of the information on a new exploding scoreboard.

Fenway
09-26-2007, 03:32 PM
1960
http://dynamic.si.cnn.com/si_online/covers/issues/1960/0704.html

1967
http://www.majorleaguemodels.com/images/billveecks1960monsterin1967.gif

by 1979 the pinwheels were there ( I assume they came in 76 when Veeck got the club back )

http://www.ballparktour.com/Comiskey_101.jpg

tebman
09-28-2007, 08:49 AM
1960
http://dynamic.si.cnn.com/si_online/covers/issues/1960/0704.html

1967
http://www.majorleaguemodels.com/images/billveecks1960monsterin1967.gif

by 1979 the pinwheels were there ( I assume they came in 76 when Veeck got the club back )

http://www.ballparktour.com/Comiskey_101.jpg

That's true -- Veeck added the pinwheels in '76 after he took over the team the second time. The ballpark was suffering from low-budget neglect when he came back and he did a lot of cosmetic work like that. I remember reading something he said at that time about having accumulated 1500 index cards of ideas if he owned a team again. The pinwheels were one of those kinds of ideas -- more excitement, more comic flash, which was Veeck's style.

TomBradley72
09-28-2007, 10:49 AM
We've gone from having one of the coolest scoreboards in baseball to one of the lamest...the whole "scoreboard menu' at the Cell is lame...and needs to be completely overhauled....sight lines are blocked, etc.

russ99
09-28-2007, 01:18 PM
I really like the current scoreboard, but seriously, that McDonalds logo instead of a clock at the top center has got to go.
I don't care how much the Sox are getting to have it there...

HomeFish
09-28-2007, 07:01 PM
I think the office of the fire marshal has a lot to do with the tamer scoreboard.

soxinem1
09-28-2007, 09:37 PM
The lamest scoreboard is the one in the HHH Metrodome, by far. Well, at least for a few more years.

I do agree that our once best in MLB scoreboard is lame. It would probably help if it was more visable.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-29-2007, 09:05 AM
1960
http://dynamic.si.cnn.com/si_online/covers/issues/1960/0704.html

1967
http://www.majorleaguemodels.com/images/billveecks1960monsterin1967.gif

by 1979 the pinwheels were there ( I assume they came in 76 when Veeck got the club back )

http://www.ballparktour.com/Comiskey_101.jpg

If I had known my ancient scanner would have its scans immortalized by the likes of so many hackers on the internet, I might not have dropped it on the curb 4 years ago and instead sent it to the Smithsonian.

You're welcome, SI.com.

HerzogVon
09-29-2007, 09:31 AM
That's true -- Veeck added the pinwheels in '76 after he took over the team the second time. The ballpark was suffering from low-budget neglect when he came back and he did a lot of cosmetic work like that. I remember reading something he said at that time about having accumulated 1500 index cards of ideas if he owned a team again. The pinwheels were one of those kinds of ideas -- more excitement, more comic flash, which was Veeck's style.

Perhaps this is common knowledge, but Veeck got the idea for the exploding scoreboard - as well as the pinwheels - from William Saroyan's play, "The Time of Your Life". Throughout the action, the character of Willie plays a pinball machine at the back of the bar. In the end, he finally hits the jackpot and the machine pays off with bells, whistles and pinwheels.

There was a 1948 movie, starring James Cagney, William Bendix and Broderick Crawford and featuring Richard Erdman as the pinball obsessed Willie that might be worth checking out.

Fenway
09-29-2007, 09:32 AM
I think the office of the fire marshal has a lot to do with the tamer scoreboard.

Having an apartment building near the scoreboard doesn't help either ( is that city owned housing back there )

tebman
09-29-2007, 10:11 AM
Perhaps this is common knowledge, but Veeck got the idea for the exploding scoreboard - as well as the pinwheels - from William Saroyan's play, "The Time of Your Life". Throughout the action, the character of Willie plays a pinball machine at the back of the bar. In the end, he finally hits the jackpot and the machine pays off with bells, whistles and pinwheels.

There was a 1948 movie, starring James Cagney, William Bendix and Broderick Crawford and featuring Richard Erdman as the pinball obsessed Willie that might be worth checking out.
Veeck described that in his book, "Veeck As In Wreck." He said he'd seen that play years before and always thought about using that exploding-pinball-machine idea for a scoreboard. When his group bought the Sox in 1959 he got his chance the following year. It was intended to be raucous and loony, which are qualities the current version doesn't have.

Having an apartment building near the scoreboard doesn't help either ( is that city owned housing back there )
I don't think that's a concern. It's already got the fireworks. What it's missing is the art of silliness in the light display, the sound effects and the overall presentation.