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Jjav829
09-25-2007, 07:29 AM
TBS also announced that former Sox slugger Frank Thomas will be part of its in-studio team. Thomas is expected to pursue a career in broadcasting after he retires.That should be interesting to watch. I can see Frank being a decent analyst.

Link (http://blogs.chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports_hardball/2007/09/return-of-caray.html)

Jaffar
09-25-2007, 08:02 AM
Nice, I always wondered if the big guy would do anything like that after his playing career. Hopefully it won't just be something to help his HOF voting and he'll actually stick with it, assuming he's any good.

SoxFan78
09-25-2007, 08:07 AM
Hopefully once he gets some experience in broadcasting, he can take DJ's or Singleton's job!!!

voodoochile
09-25-2007, 09:09 AM
I think he'll be good at it. His knowledge of the strike zone and how to hit will actually add something to the discussion and he won't be one of those screaming morons who have become all to common on TV these days.

The Immigrant
09-25-2007, 09:13 AM
Good for Big Frank.

Flight #24
09-25-2007, 10:29 AM
I could see Frank being very informative, esp on replays of hitters, talking about how they assess/read pitchers, etc. It'll be nice to see him, good luck Big Man!

WhiteSoxJunkie
09-25-2007, 11:02 AM
Nice move! :bandance:

soxfanatlanta
09-25-2007, 11:50 AM
That should be interesting to watch. I can see Frank being a decent analyst.

Link (http://blogs.chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports_hardball/2007/09/return-of-caray.html)

He does have a good speaking voice; add his knowledge and you got a pretty good gig.

skottyj242
09-25-2007, 11:52 AM
I will watch for sure. Can't wait to see that huge smile.

Huisj
09-25-2007, 02:04 PM
Any chance that down the road he could be an effective hitting coach? On one hand, his knowledge of the strike zone and approach could be very valuable, but then again, he had so much natural ability that he might have trouble getting his ideas across to average joes trying to make it in the big leagues.

PKalltheway
09-25-2007, 02:07 PM
Awesome!:bandance::D:

voodoochile
09-25-2007, 02:20 PM
Any chance that down the road he could be an effective hitting coach? On one hand, his knowledge of the strike zone and approach could be very valuable, but then again, he had so much natural ability that he might have trouble getting his ideas across to average joes trying to make it in the big leagues.

That and that the style of hitting he used most effectively for the first 8 years of his career isn't used much if at all by hitters today. It's tough to teach and you have to break down the swing and rebuild it.

I could see him having a successful broadcasting career though and it would be great if he ended up back with the Sox eventually. You can bet JR has his eyes on him if that's the case. If not, perhaps as a 1B coach. Of course probably not while KW is still in charge those guys just don't get along well.

Nellie_Fox
09-25-2007, 02:54 PM
Any chance that down the road he could be an effective hitting coach? On one hand, his knowledge of the strike zone and approach could be very valuable, but then again, he had so much natural ability that he might have trouble getting his ideas across to average joes trying to make it in the big leagues.The "Ted Williams Syndrome."

TDog
09-25-2007, 03:08 PM
The "Ted Williams Syndrome."

Ted Williams was a great hitting coach. Ty Cobb was a lousy hitting coach, as most great hitters are. But Williams was to hitting as Albert Einstein was to physics. He was the greatest hitting scientist that ever lived. He loved talking about hitting and was patient with young hitters. With the Washington Senators and Texas Rangers his value as a manager was that he was his own hitting coach. He had Nellie Fox to teach bunting, however.

Frank Thomas doesn't strike me as someone patient enough to impart what he knows about hitting. I also am skeptical about his broadcast career. He has never seemed to have the personality for it. Anyone can be an analyst, and there are some pretty bad ones. You don't have to go to the depths of Ron Santo to find ex-hometown heroes who don't belong in the broadcast booth, although their ineptitude doesn't hurt their popularity.

Nellie_Fox
09-25-2007, 03:37 PM
Ted Williams was a great hitting coach. Ty Cobb was a lousy hitting coach, as most great hitters are. But Williams was to hitting as Albert Einstein was to physics. He was the greatest hitting scientist that ever lived. He loved talking about hitting and was patient with young hitters. With the Washington Senators and Texas Rangers his value as a manager was that he was his own hitting coach. He had Nellie Fox to teach bunting, however.That's interesting, because I remember hearing several old-timers say that Ted was terribly impatient with his young ballplayers, and couldn't understand why they couldn't do what he considered instinctive, and that they couldn't grasp what he considered to be simple concepts.

TDog
09-25-2007, 04:10 PM
That's interesting, because I remember hearing several old-timers say that Ted was terribly impatient with his young ballplayers, and couldn't understand why they couldn't do what he considered instinctive, and that they couldn't grasp what he considered to be simple concepts.

People believed that would be the case when Ted Williams was hired to manage. In his book The Science of Hitting, he notes the improvement of the Senators' hitters under his instruction, to show the possibilities of his methods. He helped such different hitters as Ed Brinkman and Frank Howard, whose average improved when he went to a lighter bat. Pitchers hated Williams, though, with a very quick hook. Bill Gogolewski, after Williams left said he welcomed the change. "To Ted Williams, the wall knew more than pitchers."

I read that Williams loved coaching hitting so much that the team established he would be fined for helping opposing hitters.

eastchicagosoxfan
09-25-2007, 06:56 PM
Ted Williams was a great hitting coach. Ty Cobb was a lousy hitting coach, as most great hitters are. But Williams was to hitting as Albert Einstein was to physics. He was the greatest hitting scientist that ever lived. He loved talking about hitting and was patient with young hitters. With the Washington Senators and Texas Rangers his value as a manager was that he was his own hitting coach. He had Nellie Fox to teach bunting, however.

Frank Thomas doesn't strike me as someone patient enough to impart what he knows about hitting. I also am skeptical about his broadcast career. He has never seemed to have the personality for it. Anyone can be an analyst, and there are some pretty bad ones. You don't have to go to the depths of Ron Santo to find ex-hometown heroes who don't belong in the broadcast booth, although their ineptitude doesn't hurt their popularity.
I've always thought that Cobb's players believed him to a be a very good hitting coach. Cobb became manager of the Tigers in 1921. In 1920, they were 7th in hitting. In his first year, they moved up to third. In 1922, they were second.The Tigers led the league in hitting in 1924, and were second in 1925, and were third in 1926, Cobb's last year with the team. Harry Hielman, who won four batting titles on his way to the Hall of Fame, credited Cobb with making him into a great hitter. Heinie Manush also won a batting title under Cobb's tuteledge.

TDog
09-25-2007, 11:16 PM
I've always thought that Cobb's players believed him to a be a very good hitting coach. Cobb became manager of the Tigers in 1921. In 1920, they were 7th in hitting. In his first year, they moved up to third. In 1922, they were second.The Tigers led the league in hitting in 1924, and were second in 1925, and were third in 1926, Cobb's last year with the team. Harry Hielman, who won four batting titles on his way to the Hall of Fame, credited Cobb with making him into a great hitter. Heinie Manush also won a batting title under Cobb's tuteledge.

You may be right. Ty Cobb managed decades before I was born. What I know about him is what I've read. I remember Ted Williams being hired as manager of the Washington Senators. When Williams was enjoying success with the Senators hitters, writers were insisting that great hitters, most notably Ty Cobb, had made lousy hitting coaches because of their impatience. I even remember Jack Brickhouse talking about Ty Cobb being a lousy hitting coach.

Scottiehaswheels
09-25-2007, 11:42 PM
Let's see... Franks career over after next year? Hawk's done after next year perhaps? hmmmm

pierzynski07
09-26-2007, 01:16 PM
After hearing that Melton might be leaving after this year (it was some thread on here), maybe that could be a destination for him in a few years.

haganaga
10-03-2007, 12:38 PM
Let's see... Franks career over after next year? Hawk's done after next year perhaps? hmmmm

To make it even more interesting, throw in Steve Stone (I know, we've all heard it before but I still like the idea).

How cool would it be if Frank pans out and is a great hitting analyst coupled w/ Stoney who seems to read pitchers minds sometimes. A man can dream, can't he?

DumpJerry
10-03-2007, 12:42 PM
Too bad this guy isn't playing in the playoffs:
:XL

Jaffar
10-03-2007, 01:12 PM
So does anybody know what games to watch to see the man work?

sox1970
10-03-2007, 01:21 PM
So does anybody know what games to watch to see the man work?

I think he's just doing studio. He'll probably be equally boring as Ripken.

DSpivack
10-03-2007, 01:29 PM
To make it even more interesting, throw in Steve Stone (I know, we've all heard it before but I still like the idea).

How cool would it be if Frank pans out and is a great hitting analyst coupled w/ Stoney who seems to read pitchers minds sometimes. A man can dream, can't he?

Both of them see more like color analysts than pbp guys, though. It would seem to be a cool grouping, however.

So does anybody know what games to watch to see the man work?

He'll be a studio analyst, not working games.

skottyj242
10-03-2007, 01:38 PM
He's on right now. I can't hear him just reading the captions, he looks good but he looks like he's relying on his notes a little too much.

Jerko
10-03-2007, 01:43 PM
Was that Cal Ripken, or STEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEVE.............

http://www.waswatching.com/archives/ripsteve.jpg

ilsox7
10-03-2007, 05:27 PM
I just saw a short segment with him. He didn't sound too good, so we'll see.

Gavin
10-03-2007, 05:28 PM
He looks nervous and intimidated.

upperdeckusc
10-03-2007, 05:31 PM
Hopefully once he gets some experience in broadcasting, he can take DJ's or Singleton's job!!!

that would be pretty cool, but from what i saw today, he's got a longgggg way to go. he was pretty boring, bland, monotoned, etc. of course that'll get better, but im not ready to sit him next to hawk quite yet. but since his only competition is DJ.......

ilsox7
10-03-2007, 05:35 PM
that would be pretty cool, but from what i saw today, he's got alonggggg way to go. he was pretty boring, bland, monotoned, etc. of course that'll get better, but im not ready to sit him next to hawk quite yet. but since his only competition is DJ.......

SO he is pretty much equal to DJ thus far.

Navarro's Talent
10-03-2007, 05:49 PM
Hopefully, Frank uses this to improve his skills. As others have already mentioned, Frank has a great voice for TV and the knowledge to explain hitting. He could be really good (then again, look at the competition over at ESPN...anyone will look good going up against Kruk).

D. TODD
10-04-2007, 10:41 AM
Pretty bland stuff from "the Hurt" yesterday, but it was his first day and he wasn't terrible so good luck big fella.

ode to veeck
10-04-2007, 10:52 AM
Too bad this guy isn't playing in the playoffs:
:hurt

No **** Sherlock. He's still an awsome hitter, liked those last couple of games he was on fire for Jays this year. He could have a few more years left in him.

Boomer!?! He might make a good boat anchor.

ilsox7
10-04-2007, 11:13 AM
Pretty bland stuff from "the Hurt" yesterday, but it was his first day and he wasn't terrible so good luck big fella.

His analysis was dead on. But his delivery left a lot to be desired, but that can be worked on.

Fenway
10-04-2007, 11:27 AM
Frank needs to be coached a little bit but there is hope for him.

Ripken was simply brutal.

itsnotrequired
10-06-2007, 04:46 PM
Thomas in the studio right now trying to show viewers how to bunt.

:rolling:

PaleHoseGeorge
10-06-2007, 04:57 PM
Frank has never been the sharpest tool in the shed, so I'm not surprised to see him struggle with an assignment that requires engaging his mouth.

Still I'm glad to see TBS giving him some love and offer him the opportunity to be seen and heard by a national audience. It will take this sort of media love to make Frank a unanimous first-ballot Hall-of-Famer, an honor I believe he has already earned. There are still plenty of narrow-minded curmudgeons in the baseball writers' guild (I don't need to name names) willing to smear his accomplishments because they never liked the guy.

But they like Sosa... go figure.
:kukoo:

getonbckthr
10-06-2007, 05:00 PM
It seems like Frank at times reads from his notes word for word.

Gavin
10-06-2007, 06:45 PM
This TBS studio crew is just holistically awful.

WSox597
10-07-2007, 07:40 AM
Thomas did seem nervous and a bit ill at ease. Not too bad for his first outing, though.

Perhaps a bit self-conscious, as most of us would be in a similar role for the first time.

Granderson looked more comfortable when he was on the show. He seemed natural and relaxed.

wassagstdu
10-07-2007, 07:54 AM
Ripken was simply brutal.
Is that like "Jenks' streak was stupid?" I thought Ripken was terrific. Thomas not so much, but he came across as personally likable, so good exposure.

Madvora
10-07-2007, 08:15 AM
Is that like "Jenks' streak was stupid?" I thought Ripken was terrific. Thomas not so much, but he came across as personally likable, so good exposure.
I think Ripken is doing a great job too. It's nice to see other people than the Fox crew that has grown to drive me nuts over the years.

I don't understand the whole segment with Frank trying to bunt though. What were they thinking there?
Frank does look very nervous up there and I catch him reading directly off his card a lot, while looking at it on the desk too. I can imagine it's a difficult job to get used to.

HerzogVon
10-07-2007, 08:23 AM
Frank has never been the sharpest tool in the shed, so I'm not surprised to see him struggle with an assignment that requires engaging his mouth.

Still I'm glad to see TBS giving him some love and offer him the opportunity to be seen and heard by a national audience. It will take this sort of media love to make Frank a unanimous first-ballot Hall-of-Famer, an honor I believe he has already earned. There are still plenty of narrow-minded curmudgeons in the baseball writers' guild (I don't need to name names) willing to smear his accomplishments because they never liked the guy.

But they like Sosa... go figure.
:kukoo:

Pretty much what I was going to say. Frank got a generally raw deal from the local media, which in turn trickled up to the national coverage, as is so often the case. ( If you don't support your own, who will? ) This must have been particularly galling with regards to Samula So-So and his artificial rise to stuporstardom.

Whatever he does, I wish Frank the best of luck. He paid his dues, and he deserves it.