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SOXPHILE
09-12-2007, 12:23 PM
Interesting article in the Cubune today by Rick Morrisey. He talks about the ongoing steroid / HGH problem in baseball, mentioning the recent revelations about Rick Ankiel, Troy Glaus and Jay Gibbons. The article wouldn't be complete without at least a cursory mention of Bonds, which he does. Then, he goes on to throw in current White Sox player Jim Thome and former White Sox player Frank Thomas' names, saying how Thome, on his way to 500 HRs gets a free pass, and our cynicism makes us think that he shouldn't; How Frank Thomas "was big when he was little", and "we're certain his career was not drug aided. But are we ?" Hey, Rick ! As a matter of fact, yes, I am certain Frank Thomas' career was not drug aided. I find it quite humorous that you make sure to toss in two White Sox players names in your article, yet fail to mention a certain wife beating right fielder that used to be employed by your company, who only a complete idiot wouldn't think had some chemical "help" while playing there, all while you and your brethren in the tower never uttered a peep about this.

Foulke You
09-12-2007, 12:33 PM
Interesting article in the Cubune today by Rick Morrisey. He talks about the ongoing steroid / HGH problem in baseball, mentioning the recent revelations about Rick Ankiel, Troy Glaus and Jay Gibbons. The article wouldn't be complete without at least a cursory mention of Bonds, which he does. Then, he goes on to throw in current White Sox player Jim Thome and former White Sox player Frank Thomas' names, saying how Thome, on his way to 500 HRs gets a free pass, and our cynicism makes us think that he shouldn't; How Frank Thomas "was big when he was little", and "we're certain his career was not drug aided. But are we ?" Hey, Rick ! As a matter of fact, yes, I am certain Frank Thomas' career was not drug aided. I find it quite humorous that you make sure to toss in two White Sox players names in your article, yet fail to mention a certain wife beating right fielder that used to be employed by your company, who only a complete idiot wouldn't think had some chemical "help" while playing there, all while you and your brethren in the tower never uttered a peep about this.
Excellent post. In addition to not uttering a peep about it, the Tribune and Suntimes writers like Couch, Slezak, and Moronotti would circle the wagons to protect that cheater from criticism on a regular basis. The SI writer who wanted Sosa to take the urine test to clear his name was painted as this sleaze ball sports writer who "ambushed" Sosa. When everyone else was whispering about steroids during Sosa's ridiculous power show during the '01 HR derby in Milwaukee, the Chicago writers were busy adding to Sammy's legacy by describing the performance as "magical" and "awe inspiring".

Deep down, I think these media guys know they screwed up big time with Sosa but now are too ashamed to even write about him. Don't get me wrong, I hate Mariotti with a passion but he was one of the few local writers who actually owned up to being wrong about Sam the Sham.

WhiteSox5187
09-12-2007, 12:37 PM
Excellent post. In addition to not uttering a peep about it, the Tribune and Suntimes writers like Couch, Slezak, and Moronotti would circle the wagons to protect that cheater from criticism on a regular basis. The SI writer who wanted Sosa to take the urine test to clear his name was painted as this sleaze ball sports writer who "ambushed" Sosa. When everyone else was whispering about steroids during Sosa's ridiculous power show during the '01 HR derby in Milwaukee, the Chicago writers were busy adding to Sammy's legacy by describing the performance as "magical" and "awe inspiring".

Deep down, I think these media guys know they screwed up big time with Sosa but now are too ashamed to even write about him. Don't get me wrong, I hate Mariotti with a passion but he was one of the few local writers who actually owned up to being wrong about Sam the Sham.
The writer was Rick Reilly who is very well respected in the sports media buisness, and while writers in Chicago (like Mariotti) said Reilly tried to ambush him, I think nationally it made more writers suspicious...I didn't read the article by Morrisey today, but from the sound of your post and the quotes you had in it, I think that he was trying to say "Can we really be sure that anyone is clean?" I don't think that Morrisey believes that either Thomas or Thome did steroids, I seem to recall him writing a very favorable article about Frank a couple of years ago how he was one of the few sluggers who not only stayed clean but WANTED stricter testing and was very upset that he was going to be potentially cast in the same light as guys like McGwire, Sosa and Bonds, guys with obviously inflated numbers.

TDog
09-12-2007, 01:05 PM
... I find it quite humorous that you make sure to toss in two White Sox players names in your article, yet fail to mention a certain wife beating right fielder that used to be employed by your company, who only a complete idiot wouldn't think had some chemical "help" while playing there, all while you and your brethren in the tower never uttered a peep about this.

And ironically, Sammy Sosa was a wife beater when he was with the White Sox. He was not regarded as a wife beater when he was with the Cubs, but, of course, he didn't beat his replacement Swedish trophy wife. It really doesn't seem fair that Wil Cordero was considered a wife beater when he was with the Sox, even though his wife-beating actions preceded his employment by the Sox. But as Harry Caray used to say -- and sometimes he was sober enough to be understood -- "that's baseball."

The Contra Costa Times, in A's country, ran a column in 2005 accusing Frank Thomas of being part of the steroids bunch. For what it's worth, the writer reasoned that Thomas' injuries are the sort of injuries that come with steroids use. Not that he illustrated the point by mentioning, oh, Mark McGwire's injuries. If you're looking for 'roiders in NoCal, you shouldn't have to widen your search to teams only visiting NoCal once or twice a year. But the column illustrated that a lot of talk about performance-enhancing drugs comes in the form of a witch hunt. You don't like successful players? You don't have to. Call them cheaters to justify yourself.

I'm not sure that Rick Morrisey's point was to suggest Thomas was on steroids. Rather, I believe he was saying that event the sluggers from this era who seem most Innocent will be tarnished by the pr evelance of steroids in this era. Sosa is suspect and doesn't fit with that point, although his absence may seem glaring. If that was his point, I think he might be right.

I don't expect either Frank Thomas or Jim Thome, both of whom I am certain have been clean in their careers, to make the Hall of Fame on their first-year-of-eligibility ballot. I don't expect Barry Bonds will either, but that's a different situation.

D. TODD
09-12-2007, 01:19 PM
And ironically, Sammy Sosa was a wife beater when he was with the White Sox. He was not regarded as a wife beater when he was with the Cubs, but, of course, he didn't beat his replacement Swedish trophy wife. It really doesn't seem fair that Wil Cordero was considered a wife beater when he was with the Sox, even though his wife-beating actions preceded his employment by the Sox. But as Harry Caray used to say -- and sometimes he was sober enough to be understood -- "that's baseball."

The Contra Costa Times, in A's country, ran a column in 2005 accusing Frank Thomas of being part of the steroids bunch. For what it's worth, the writer reasoned that Thomas' injuries are the sort of injuries that come with steroids use. Not that he illustrated the point by mentioning, oh, Mark McGwire's injuries. If you're looking for 'roiders in NoCal, you shouldn't have to widen your search to teams only visiting NoCal once or twice a year. But the column illustrated that a lot of talk about performance-enhancing drugs comes in the form of a witch hunt. You don't like successful players? You don't have to. Call them cheaters to justify yourself.

I'm not sure that Rick Morrisey's point was to suggest Thomas was on steroids. Rather, I believe he was saying that event the sluggers from this era who seem most Innocent will be tarnished by the pr evelance of steroids in this era. Sosa is suspect and doesn't fit with that point, although his absence may seem glaring. If that was his point, I think he might be right.

I don't expect either Frank Thomas or Jim Thome, both of whom I am certain have been clean in their careers, to make the Hall of Fame on their first-year-of-eligibility ballot. I don't expect Barry Bonds will either, but that's a different situation. We as fans have absolutely NO idea who used and to what level they used. Screw the speculation and investigations into the past. Most players used some form of "performance enhancers" that are now banned in the game. Concentrate on enforcing & improving tests for the here and now!

SOXPHILE
09-12-2007, 01:50 PM
And ironically, Sammy Sosa was a wife beater when he was with the White Sox. He was not regarded as a wife beater when he was with the Cubs, but, of course, he didn't beat his replacement Swedish trophy wife. It really doesn't seem fair that Wil Cordero was considered a wife beater when he was with the Sox, even though his wife-beating actions preceded his employment by the Sox. But as Harry Caray used to say -- and sometimes he was sober enough to be understood -- "that's baseball."

The Contra Costa Times, in A's country, ran a column in 2005 accusing Frank Thomas of being part of the steroids bunch. For what it's worth, the writer reasoned that Thomas' injuries are the sort of injuries that come with steroids use. Not that he illustrated the point by mentioning, oh, Mark McGwire's injuries. If you're looking for 'roiders in NoCal, you shouldn't have to widen your search to teams only visiting NoCal once or twice a year. But the column illustrated that a lot of talk about performance-enhancing drugs comes in the form of a witch hunt. You don't like successful players? You don't have to. Call them cheaters to justify yourself.

I'm not sure that Rick Morrisey's point was to suggest Thomas was on steroids. Rather, I believe he was saying that event the sluggers from this era who seem most Innocent will be tarnished by the pr evelance of steroids in this era. Sosa is suspect and doesn't fit with that point, although his absence may seem glaring. If that was his point, I think he might be right.

I don't expect either Frank Thomas or Jim Thome, both of whom I am certain have been clean in their careers, to make the Hall of Fame on their first-year-of-eligibility ballot. I don't expect Barry Bonds will either, but that's a different situation.

Oh, I remember Sosa's little rum bottle incident well. I believe it was 1991, and he was late reporting to spring training with the Sox because of visa problems, tied in with these legal problems. Shortly thereafter, he was traded to the Cubs.

What gets me pissed about Morrisey's article is that, as mentioned earlier, he and the rest of Dan McGraths' Merry Men didn't say a single thing about Sosa's legal problems, or obvious steroid / HGH use while he was employed with their company. Yet, they never pass up a chance to point out or embellish a bit, something bad about the the White Sox, or one of the players. Rick Morrisey even had the audacity last year to cluck cluck at us Sox fans for daring to continuously point out these, and other obvious conflict of interests with the Tribune Corp. owning the Cubs, and actually said that he was one of the writers there who was critical of Sosa, and raised questions about his chemical "help". Funny thing though, Ricky boy, nobody can recall or find any these articles you say you wrote pre-dating 2005, i.e. before Sosa shed the Tribune blue and red uniform and became an Oriole.