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View Full Version : Idea of a 6 man rotation


AuroraSoxFan
07-11-2007, 10:05 AM
Few of us got to talking about the idea of a 6 man rotation. not saying the Sox (or any other team) should do it. Just an idea.

pros:
1. less innings on the arms of starters, possibly prolonging their careers and having arms fresh down the stretch
2. likely less pressure on each SP

cons:
1. will cost a lot of $$ with the current dollars SP's get these days
2. leaves the bench or pen one player short
3. can possibly screw up the flow of the SP's (32-33 starts to 27, 1 more day off in between starts)

Does anyone know if any teams have ever tried this for an extended period. Teams often have a AAA SP or long reliever make a spot start. Just wondering if any team has tried it for a significant portion of a season and how it has worked. Couldn't think of any examples off the top of my head.
Any thoughts on the idea?

Mickster
07-11-2007, 10:17 AM
I've listened to Steve Stone on numerous occasions state his belief that some teams will try a 4 man rotation in the near future. He states the lack of quality pitching and the cost of even low-end 5th starters (not ML rookies or call-ups) is getting in the 6-7 mil range. Also stated that the average number of wins out of the fifth starter spot league-wide is around 5 wins per year.

eriqjaffe
07-11-2007, 10:17 AM
Given how hard it is for most teams to field five capable starters, I can't imagine any team willing to experiment with it. Seems like a recipe for losing, if you ask me.

AuroraSoxFan
07-11-2007, 10:22 AM
I think you'd need a Steinbrenner style pocket book to make it work well. you'd have to shell out a lot of cash for 6 reliable SP's. Plus....one thing .....injuries would likely sting a LOT more If they went with 6 they'd likely go 1 bench player short. If they are all utility guys that can play multiple positions that is fine. But if one SP or bench guy went down it could really throw the entire flow off. they may have to replace the SP with a lower quality SP or go back to a 5 man rotation screwing up the timing of the remaining 5 guys.

AuroraSoxFan
07-11-2007, 10:24 AM
I've listened to Steve Stone on numerous occasions state his belief that some teams will try a 4 man rotation in the near future. He states the lack of quality pitching and the cost of even low-end 5th starters (not ML rookies or call-ups) is getting in the 6-7 mil range. Also stated that the average number of wins out of the fifth starter spot league-wide is around 5 wins per year.

5 W's a year is the average for a 5th atarter??? If that came from Stoney it is probably pretty accurate. If it is, i guess we shouldn't complain about Javy so much.

eriqjaffe
07-11-2007, 10:45 AM
5 W's a year is the average for a 5th atarter??? If that came from Stoney it is probably pretty accurate. If it is, i guess we shouldn't complain about Javy so much.Javy isn't our #5 starter...

PKalltheway
07-11-2007, 11:26 AM
It's hard enough for teams to have 5 good starters, let alone 6. The best I've seen was the 1998 Braves, who had all 5 of their starters win at least 15 games.:o:

Chicken Dinner
07-11-2007, 11:36 AM
You would have to have a very effective bullpen to have 6 starters and most teams don't. You need that extra arm in the pen.

Railsplitter
07-11-2007, 12:35 PM
Some teams can't even find five quality starters.

TDog
07-11-2007, 01:14 PM
I've listened to Steve Stone on numerous occasions state his belief that some teams will try a 4 man rotation in the near future. He states the lack of quality pitching and the cost of even low-end 5th starters (not ML rookies or call-ups) is getting in the 6-7 mil range. Also stated that the average number of wins out of the fifth starter spot league-wide is around 5 wins per year.

Steve Stone was part of a three-man rotation for a time when he was pitching for the White Sox.

chaerulez
07-11-2007, 01:35 PM
I've listened to Steve Stone on numerous occasions state his belief that some teams will try a 4 man rotation in the near future. He states the lack of quality pitching and the cost of even low-end 5th starters (not ML rookies or call-ups) is getting in the 6-7 mil range. Also stated that the average number of wins out of the fifth starter spot league-wide is around 5 wins per year.

I don't think it's a bad idea either. Think of the 2003-2004 White Sox, when we couldn't find a fifth starter worth a damn and how just going four might've made the team better. Of course, that's something you have to plan for starting in spring training. I don't think you can just go from five to four in the middle of the season and expect positive results.