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Fenway
07-08-2007, 12:59 PM
In 1983 the White Sox had their best season in 24 years and were favorites to win the World Series.

A year later a complete disaster.

Problem was a huge part of the 1983 team was not there in 1984.

Charley Lau died in March.

The NY Daily News looks back at Lau today

23 years after his death, Lau's swing lives on (http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/2007/07/08/2007-07-08_stroke_of_genius.html)

Ted Williams despised him and was enranged when the Red Sox hired Walt Hriniak


"I took offense to what Ted said. It (ticked) me off," says Hriniak in his home in North Andover, Mass., his voice rising. "I think there was jealousy because (Lau) had all the hitters listening to him. They knocked him because he was a .250 hitter, but his failures as a hitter made him a better teacher and more compassionate instructor. What did Ted Williams know about failure? Lau could understand failure, great hitters like Ted Williams can't understand failure.

"Look around the league. I watch games every day and nearly 25 years after his death his swing is still here. Alex Rodriguez, Albert Pujols, Ken Griffey Jr., Frank Thomas. I don't like saying this because he's not with us anymore, but Ted was wrong."

BainesHOF
07-08-2007, 01:59 PM
I thought you might have been talking about Jorge Orta.

Brian26
07-08-2007, 02:07 PM
That's a great article.

Was Lau actually on the bench during the entire '83 season, or did he have to leave about halfway through?

Fenway
07-09-2007, 09:14 AM
That's a great article.

Was Lau actually on the bench during the entire '83 season, or did he have to leave about halfway through?

Just did a check on proquest

Boston Globe Newspaper Oct 5, 1983
The eyes do not leave the batting cage very often. Charlie Lau sits on a fold-out chair at the edge of the Memorial Stadium field, 30 feet away, but always he is looking at his hitters, watching their swings, looking for the subtle clink or clank in a rusty motion that might convert a ground- rule double into a popup to short.

"Did you get to see many of the games?" he was asked yesterday afternoon.

"I don't think I missed one game all year, to tell you the truth," Charlie Lau replies. "I was in some different hospitals, but before I went I made sure they had Sportvision, so I could see the games on cable. The ones I couldn't see, I was sent videotapes."




http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.sfpl.org/pqdweb?index=4&did=664049791&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1183986594&clientId=3266

Brian26
07-09-2007, 08:09 PM
Just did a check on proquest





http://proquest.umi.com.ezproxy.sfpl.org/pqdweb?index=4&did=664049791&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1183986594&clientId=3266

Thanks for checking that, Fenway. It appears he indeed missed the season, and they brought him back for the playoffs.

It's a funny quote. He had to order Sportsvision to see the games...Einhorn's pet project not only screwed the fans, but it screwed Charlie.

DenverSock
07-09-2007, 09:08 PM
Quote:

"I took offense to what Ted said. It (ticked) me off," says Hriniak in his home in North Andover, Mass., his voice rising. "I think there was jealousy because (Lau) had all the hitters listening to him. They knocked him because he was a .250 hitter, but his failures as a hitter made him a better teacher and more compassionate instructor. What did Ted Williams know about failure? Lau could understand failure, great hitters like Ted Williams can't understand failure.

"Look around the league. I watch games every day and nearly 25 years after his death his swing is still here. Alex Rodriguez, Albert Pujols, Ken Griffey Jr., Frank Thomas. I don't like saying this because he's not with us anymore, but Ted was wrong."


When I coached little league I taught using Charlie Lau's techniques. It was so straight forward. It worked very well. This was very important to me because I was teaching in a foreign language in a foreign country.


P.S. When I clicked on the link I got the San Fransisco Public Library. Is that correct?

tacosalbarojas
07-09-2007, 10:40 PM
I've asked this question before and no one has been able to answer it but I don't recall any White Sox wearing #6 in a long, long time, maybe since Lau. Anyone know why this is - if it's a tribute to Lau or what. I know players like the low numbers so I find it odd that no notable players have worn it for a long time for us.

michned
07-10-2007, 01:18 AM
I also remember he appeared in the movie Max Dugan Returns to teach Matthew Broderick how to hit. This was also right before he took ill.

SBSoxFan
07-10-2007, 09:02 AM
I've asked this question before and no one has been able to answer it but I don't recall any White Sox wearing #6 in a long, long time, maybe since Lau. Anyone know why this is - if it's a tribute to Lau or what. I know players like the low numbers so I find it odd that no notable players have worn it for a long time for us.

In the article, it said the number has been unofficially retired, and that the Sox may officially retire it and hold a Charlie Lau day in the future.

Fenway
07-10-2007, 09:05 AM
P.S. When I clicked on the link I got the San Fransisco Public Library. Is that correct?

I use their database....I bought a non-resident card from them last year

nsolo
07-10-2007, 09:41 AM
I only wanted to say thank for for sharing the article/link. It enjoyed it.

Fenway
07-10-2007, 09:49 AM
Thanks for checking that, Fenway. It appears he indeed missed the season, and they brought him back for the playoffs.

It's a funny quote. He had to order Sportsvision to see the games...Einhorn's pet project not only screwed the fans, but it screwed Charlie.

I think it also shows his dedication to the team. The man is dying and he won't go to a hospital that didn't offer Sportsvision.

mark2olson
07-10-2007, 03:00 PM
Problem was a huge part of the 1983 team was not there in 1984.

My son's former HS/Legion coach, although unaware of the history of the approach, taught his players Charlie's approach under the title "linear hitting." The principals were the same, for the most part, although my son's coach seemed to emphasize more cocking of the wrists and a higher bat angle. The kids on the team who did follow this approach, once they got the hang of it, started to hit more line drives and were hitting the ball harder.

Interestingly, my son's coach intimated to me that he wished "linear hitting" was around when he was in school. He seems genuinely shocked when I told him that he was teaching the Charlie Lau method of hitting and that it was around before he was in school.