PDA

View Full Version : Questionable call in the college WS. Clarification?


ndgt10
06-23-2007, 08:32 PM
1st and 3rd with one out. The hitter flies out, the runner from 3rd tags, but the runner from 1st was running the whole way as if there were 2 outs. The ball is thrown to first base for the 3rd out, but the runner from 3rd crossed homeplate before the out was recorded. Should the run have counted?

FYI, the run was counted, but nobody appears to know the answer for sure.

bigfoot
06-23-2007, 08:49 PM
A FORCE PLAY is a play in which a runner legally loses his right to occupy a base by reason of the batter becoming a runner. Confusion regarding this play is removed by remembering that frequently the "force" situation is removed during the play. Example: Man on first, one out, ball hit sharply to first baseman who touches the bag and batter runner is out. The force is removed at that moment and runner advancing to second must be tagged. If there had been a runner on third or second, and either of these runners scored before the tag out at second, the run counts. Had the first baseman thrown to second and the ball then had been returned to first, the play at second was a force out, making two outs, and the return throw to first ahead of the runner would have made three outs. In that case, no run would score. Example: Not a force out. One out. Runner on first and third. Batter flies out. Two out. Runner on third tags up and scores. Runner on first tries to retouch before throw from fielder reaches first baseman, but does not get back in time and is out. Three outs. If, in umpire's judgment, the runner from third touched home before the ball was held at first base, the run counts.

Daver
06-23-2007, 09:02 PM
1st and 3rd with one out. The hitter flies out, the runner from 3rd tags, but the runner from 1st was running the whole way as if there were 2 outs. The ball is thrown to first base for the 3rd out, but the runner from 3rd crossed homeplate before the out was recorded. Should the run have counted?

FYI, the run was counted, but nobody appears to know the answer for sure.


The run was recorded before the third out was made, the umpires scored it correctly.

Brian26
06-23-2007, 09:12 PM
Let's throw this example out-

Runners on first and third with one out. There's a slow dribbler to shortstop with Konerko running. It's a slow developing play that turns into a 6-4-3 doubleplay. Pods was on 3rd base, was off with the pitch, and crossed the plate before the ball was caught by Casey at first to complete the DP.

Does Pods' run count here? I've never seen that run count in 29 years of watching baseball.

itsnotrequired
06-23-2007, 09:25 PM
Let's throw this example out-

Runners on first and third with one out. There's a slow dribbler to shortstop with Konerko running. It's a slow developing play that turns into a 6-4-3 doubleplay. Pods was on 3rd base, was off with the pitch, and crossed the plate before the ball was caught by Casey at first to complete the DP.

Does Pods' run count here? I've never seen that run count in 29 years of watching baseball.

The outs recorded on the double play are both forces so the run wouldn't count. But if it was a dribbler to first and they got the first out at first, the out at second is no longer a force. If Pods crosses before the second out of the double play, then the run would count.

Brian26
06-23-2007, 09:36 PM
The outs recorded on the double play are both forces so the run wouldn't count. But if it was a dribbler to first and they got the first out at first, the out at second is no longer a force. If Pods crosses before the second out of the double play, then the run would count.

Right, that's the way I've always understood it. The above example for the College WS isn't a doubleplay in the sense of runners being forced out. It's a doubeplay in the sense that the runner didn't tag up. He's not out on a force. Makes sense once you step back and think about it... :D:

ilsox7
06-23-2007, 09:40 PM
Right, that's the way I've always understood it. The above example for the College WS isn't a doubleplay in the sense of runners being forced out. It's a doubeplay in the sense that the runner didn't tag up. He's not out on a force. Makes sense once you step back and think about it... :D:

I have the rule book memorized so I didn't have to step back and think about it. :cool:

Brian26
06-23-2007, 09:46 PM
I have the rule book memorized so I didn't have to step back and think about it. :cool:

Explain the infield fly rule as succinctly and correctly as possible in two minutes.

Go!

ilsox7
06-23-2007, 09:47 PM
Explain the infield fly rule as succinctly and correctly as possible in two minutes.

Go!

Runners on 1st and 2nd or bases loaded, less than two outs, any ball in the air that can be reasonably expected to be caught by an infielder results in the batter being automatically out. Runners go at their own risk.

Brian26
06-23-2007, 09:48 PM
Correct!

Explain the three ways a pitcher can earn a save.

Go!

Boondock Saint
06-24-2007, 01:41 AM
I know a pitcher can earn a save by pitching the last three or more innings of a game. But I can't quite explain the way it works in the normal manner.

WhiteSoxJunkie
06-24-2007, 01:47 AM
Correct!

Explain the three ways a pitcher can earn a save.

Go!

1. Come into the game with the tying run at least on deck and finish the game without giving up the lead.

2. Pitch 3 quality innings in relief.

3. ??? Didn't know there was a third way.

soxfanreggie
06-24-2007, 12:31 PM
Had this happen in one of my softball leagues. Luckily we scored to tie the game before our runner on 1st got doubled off.

voodoochile
06-24-2007, 12:46 PM
1. Come into the game with the tying run at least on deck and finish the game without giving up the lead.

2. Pitch 3 quality innings in relief.

3. ??? Didn't know there was a third way.

Pitch the final inning completely with no more than a 3 run lead.