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View Full Version : Most Intimidating Baseball Player Ever??


messma03
04-12-2007, 10:57 AM
Check out this official ranking I found, then let me know if you agree:

http://maximonline.com/slideshows/index.aspx?imgCollectId=173&src=mtm70

Who do you think should or shouldn't be on this list?

soxfan13
04-12-2007, 11:00 AM
Along with the biggest ego in baseball I have to stick with this man!!!!


http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/gallery/data/6/medium/sox2_022.jpg (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=1587&size=big&cat=&si=chips)

DarkHorse35
04-12-2007, 11:22 AM
Ty Cobb was pretty intimidating with the whole sharpening spikes and beat cripples. Wouldn't want to mess with the Georgia Peach.

daveeym
04-12-2007, 11:30 AM
Hmmm, does someone work for Maxim?

FedEx227
04-12-2007, 11:35 AM
Dice-K

Seriously though, when I see old videos of Bob Gibson pitching he looks like quite the intimidating fellow.

And I agree with the poster above the whole unbelievable racism, spikes and cripple-beating ways of Ty Cobb are up there.

mrfourni
04-12-2007, 12:02 PM
As much as i hate the guy, i think Barroids is more intimidating than Sheff.

PKalltheway
04-12-2007, 12:11 PM
Willie McCovey anyone? I believe that he was the only person Don Drysdale was actually afraid of.

Frank Howard 6'8, 275 pounds?! I wish I could see a film clip of one of his bombs.:o:

veeter
04-12-2007, 12:27 PM
JR Richard, Bob Gibson and Willie Stargell.

Chez
04-12-2007, 12:28 PM
I agree with the choice of Bob Gibson. But where's Willie Stargell, Dave Parker, Willie McCovey (as previously posted) or Ryne Duren?

EndemicSox
04-12-2007, 12:28 PM
I've only been watching the game for a decade, but I'll do this from a pitcher's perspective. Bonds goes without saying, and one has to think the Big Hurt, in his prime, is towards the top of the list. Dennis Eckersley would have freaked me out as well.

Chez
04-12-2007, 12:30 PM
Frank Howard 6'8, 275 pounds?! I wish I could see a film clip of one of his bombs.:o:

Howard was also a terrific basketball player at Ohio State.

Nellie_Fox
04-12-2007, 12:32 PM
How can they leave off Early Wynn? Various versions of this story float around about him, but even if apocryphal it shows the reputation he had:

Sportscaster: "Early, they say you're so mean that you'd throw at your own mother."

Early: "Well, mom's a pretty good hitter."

PaulDrake
04-12-2007, 12:39 PM
How can they leave off Early Wynn? Various versions of this story float around about him, but even if apocryphal it shows the reputation he had:

Sportscaster: "Early, they say you're so mean that you'd throw at your own mother."

Early: "Well, mom's a pretty good hitter." I read a story a long time ago about one of his son's hitting a batting practice home run against him when he was still with Cleveland. On the next pitch he knocked his own kid down. When Wynn was doing color commentary for the Blue Jays, Reggie Jackson hit a home run against the home team, and then preened in admiration. Wynn stated, and I'm paraphrasing based on memory, "I wish I could pitch against him just one time".

Whitesox029
04-12-2007, 12:47 PM
How can they leave off Early Wynn? Various versions of this story float around about him, but even if apocryphal it shows the reputation he had:

Sportscaster: "Early, they say you're so mean that you'd throw at your own mother."

Early: "Well, mom's a pretty good hitter."
I was going to mention Early too. Another quote I remember hearing from him was "I'd knock down my own grandmother if she crowded the plate on me."

In the same vein, I've heard stories about Burleigh Grimes too. He once threw at a batter in the on-deck circle. He had quite the fastball too. He actually lived to be 92 years old, dying in 1985, which I didn't know until I looked him up.

johnr1note
04-12-2007, 01:00 PM
I read a story a long time ago about one of his son's hitting a batting practice home run against him when he was still with Cleveland. On the next pitch he knocked his own kid down. When Wynn was doing color commentary for the Blue Jays, Reggie Jackson hit a home run against the home team, and then preened in admiration. Wynn stated, and I'm paraphrasing based on memory, "I wish I could pitch against him just one time".

I had also heard a story, probably aprocryphal, about Wynn dusting up his son in a father/son game when Wynn was still with the White Sox, and his comment was something to the effect of "nobody crowds the plate against me."

maurice
04-12-2007, 01:19 PM
Gibson and Drysdale.

Dan Mega
04-12-2007, 01:44 PM
I had also heard a story, probably aprocryphal, about Wynn dusting up his son in a father/son game when Wynn was still with the White Sox, and his comment was something to the effect of "nobody crowds the plate against me."

Clemens' son hit a HR against him and he buzzed him near the chin with a fastball the next time he came up. This was in an exhibition game, so this guy is just a little nuts too.

I am going to throw Nolan Ryan in there.

eriqjaffe
04-12-2007, 01:49 PM
I'd go with the guy on the left here:

http://www.animationusa.com/picts/baseball/2_Palooka.jpg

wdelaney72
04-12-2007, 01:52 PM
Intimidating pitchers:
Randy Johnson (prior to him cutting his hair).
Pete Vukovich

Batters:
Babe Ruth
Frank Thomas
Willie Stargell was also a good call.

I refuse to included roided players in this conversation.

PatK
04-12-2007, 01:53 PM
Albert Belle in his prime.

He looked absolutely scary the way he crowded the plate.

Plus, he was nuts. Anyone that tries to run over kids for a Halloween prank has some screws loose.

PaulDrake
04-12-2007, 02:12 PM
Plus, he was nuts. Ask Fernando Vina.

Nellie_Fox
04-12-2007, 02:19 PM
Oh, and as far as hitters, Dick Allen. Not only did he hit the ball possibly harder than anybody I ever saw, he usually hit it right back up the middle. He often said that his recurring nightmare was that he would take a pitcher's head off some day.

WhiteSox5187
04-12-2007, 04:46 PM
Early Wynn definately belongs on that list. NOBODY dug in against him. Bob Gibson is probably the right choice at number one...another blast from the past, John McGraw. The guy more or less invented the rules of baseball retaliation. Go in with your spikes high on a double play, if they hit one of your guys you hit their best. He was a nasty little SOB. Also, I never saw him play (actually I didn't see any of the guys mentioned play), but my dad says Nellie Fox was a tough little guy. He wasn't afraid of anybody and would go in with spikes a flyin' to turn double plays and wasn't afraid of guys coming in with spikes high. But, perhaps my father is wrong there.

sox1970
04-12-2007, 04:53 PM
Dave Winfield.

Today's game--Travis Hafner

Fenway
04-12-2007, 04:59 PM
I agree with Bob Gibson

and in the 60's Dick Radatz

http://www.sonsofsamhorn.net/wiki/images/thumb/9/90/Radatz.jpg/250px-Radatz.jpg (http://www.sonsofsamhorn.net/wiki/index.php/Image:Radatz.jpg)

PaulDrake
04-12-2007, 05:03 PM
I agree with Bob Gibson

and in the 60's Dick Radatz

http://www.sonsofsamhorn.net/wiki/images/thumb/9/90/Radatz.jpg/250px-Radatz.jpg (http://www.sonsofsamhorn.net/wiki/index.php/Image:Radatz.jpg) The monster.

maurice
04-12-2007, 06:15 PM
Hafner's not so tough. BUEHRLE was able to take him out with a pitch.
:D:

tick53
04-12-2007, 06:45 PM
Bob Gibson, the original Intimidator.

eastchicagosoxfan
04-12-2007, 07:41 PM
A few names, some mentioned already, others not:
Amos Russie
John McGraw
Ty Cobb
Carl Mays
Walter Johnson ( and he didn't even try )
Josh Gibson
Babe Ruth
Joe Medwick
Thurmon Munson
Dick Allen
Al Hrabosky

viagracat
04-12-2007, 08:22 PM
I'll go with Gibson and Drysdale, with the edge going to Gibson. He was a mean SOB. Nobody dug in against him. He was even more intimidating before they lowered the mound after the 1968 season when he had a 1.12 ERA.

I heard a story about Drysdale once: he was told by his manager to intentionally walk a batter. Instead, he hit the guy. Supposedly he said afterward: "Why waste four pitches when one will do?" :smile:

They don't make too many like that anymore.

Fenway
04-12-2007, 08:24 PM
The monster.

I met him serveral times and once tried to match him drink for drink in Florida

I failed badly....

He was just a massive human being

Fenway
04-12-2007, 08:27 PM
I think I heard this story on Ken Burns Baseball

McCarver: Bob there is a man on second

Gibson: Don't you think I know that , I put him there you &^%%#$@& idiot. Now shutup and catch

He could shut Tim McCarver up :smile:

TornLabrum
04-12-2007, 08:42 PM
Take a look at walk totals for ANY hitter before Babe Ruth. Then take a look at Ruth's. They used to walk him to get to Gehrig for cryin' out loud! He walked 104 times when he was 39 years old. That's intimidation.

As for pitchers, I could go with a quartet (in any order) of Gibson, Wynn, Maglie (they didn't call him the barber because he gave haircuts), and Drysdale.

Vernam
04-12-2007, 09:27 PM
Hafner's not so tough. BUEHRLE was able to take him out with a pitch.
:D:I was at that game, and the crowd got ugly. Sox went on to sweep 'em four straight, and it looked like the Tribe was dead for the year. But . . .

As for the list, I like Gibson as #1. How can Cobb not be there? I'd substitute Gossage for Hershiser -- too polite. Who's that skinny guy bashing forearms with Canseco?!

Vernam

Nellie_Fox
04-12-2007, 09:45 PM
I think I heard this story on Ken Burns Baseball

McCarver: Bob there is a man on second

Gibson: Don't you think I know that , I put him there you &^%%#$@& idiot. Now shutup and catch

He could shut Tim McCarver up :smile:

To shortstop Dal Maxville, who had just trotted in from short to "settle down" Gibson:

"The only thing you know about pitching is that you can't hit it. Get off my mound."

To manager Red Schoendienst, who came out to take Gibson out of a game, as he reached for the ball and Gibson wouldn't give it to him:

"Who do you have out there who's better than me?"

Schoendienst just walked back to the dugout.

Ziggy S
04-12-2007, 10:26 PM
To shortstop Dal Maxville, who had just trotted in from short to "settle down" Gibson:

"The only thing you know about pitching is that you can't hit it. Get off my mound."



Schoendienst just walked back to the dugout.
I had always thought he said that to the assclown known as McCarver. Well, you learn something every day.

FarWestChicago
04-12-2007, 10:44 PM
Oh, and as far as hitters, Dick Allen. Not only did he hit the ball possibly harder than anybody I ever saw, he usually hit it right back up the middle. He often said that his recurring nightmare was that he would take a pitcher's head off some day.Gibson is a fine Number 1. But you are right about Dick Allen. I used to worry about him killing a pitcher. I would see a pitcher get blasted by a mere mortal and wonder what would happen if Dick Allen ever nailed a guy. :o:

slobes
04-12-2007, 11:18 PM
As much as i hate the guy, i think Barroids is more intimidating than Sheff.

I definitely agree. Barry sees like 1 good pitch every week and is still a very dangerous hitter.

Railsplitter
04-13-2007, 11:11 AM
"Who do you have out there who's better than me?"

Schoendienst just walked back to the dugout.

There was a stretch for about two years where Schoendienst never pulled Gibson. He'd lift Gibby for a pinch hitter, but that would be it.

Foulke You
04-13-2007, 12:51 PM
I think Johan Santana should be on the list. He is by far the most intimidating pitcher in today's game I think. Teams wilt before he even steps to the mound it seems.

Jim Thome is pretty intimidating too and deserves a mention. Nobody on the White Sox gets pitched around or intentionally walked more than Jim. He points that bat at the pitcher before he digs in and it has to have a bit of psychological effect on the opposing pitcher and manager that Paul Bunyan is one meatball pitch away from launching this ball into orbit.:cool:

voodoochile
04-13-2007, 01:08 PM
Take a look at walk totals for ANY hitter before Babe Ruth. Then take a look at Ruth's. They used to walk him to get to Gehrig for cryin' out loud! He walked 104 times when he was 39 years old. That's intimidation.

As for pitchers, I could go with a quartet (in any order) of Gibson, Wynn, Maglie (they didn't call him the barber because he gave haircuts), and Drysdale.

Isn't Ruth the only guy in history to be intentionally walked with the bases loaded? He was the first player who came to mind when I read the title of this thread.

twentywontowin
04-13-2007, 01:11 PM
Isn't Ruth the only guy in history to be intentionally walked with the bases loaded? He was the first player who came to mind when I read the title of this thread.

The Diamondbacks intentionally walked Bonds with the bases loaded before. I want to say it was in 1998.

Dan the Man
04-13-2007, 01:11 PM
In a few years Pujols will be on this list. Every time he steps up, you know he's gonna hit the ball hard. He rarely strikes out, and his swing looks so effortless yet he hits the ball a mile. I think pitchers are finally starting to pitch around him, as seen by his slow start this year.

TDog
04-13-2007, 01:34 PM
Isn't Ruth the only guy in history to be intentionally walked with the bases loaded? He was the first player who came to mind when I read the title of this thread.


Nap Lajoie was intentionally walked with the bases loaded in 1901.

Bucky F. Dent
04-13-2007, 05:13 PM
Absolutely MUST have Don Drysdale on this list, in fact, I would argue that he should have been second behind Gibson.

ND_Sox_Fan
04-13-2007, 06:47 PM
I would have to think Pete "Charlie Hustle" Rose would have to make the list for not taking a pitch off anytime he was between the chalk and for essentially ending Ray Fosse's career in the 1970 all-star game.

PaulDrake
04-13-2007, 07:38 PM
I would have to think Pete "Charlie Hustle" Rose would have to make the list for not taking a pitch off anytime he was between the chalk and for essentially ending Ray Fosse's career in the 1970 all-star game. Fosse was adversley affected by his collision with Rose. He never showed the same power and consistency at the plate. However, in no way did it end his career. In 1970 Fosse made the All Star team and won a Gold Glove. He did the same in 1971. Here are his games played and at bats for the period from 1970-73.

Year GP AB
1970 120 450
1971 133 486
1972 134 457
1973 143 492

Always injury prone dating back to his minor league days, Fosse was hurt 3 times in 1974, the last one being nerve and disc damage breaking up a fight between Reggie Jackson and Billy North in the Oakland A's clubhouse. Those threepeat A's were quite the fun bunch. Fosse really saw limited action after that, retiring after the 1979 season.

Ray Fosse's stats. http://www.baseball-reference.com/f/fossera01.shtml

hose
04-13-2007, 08:54 PM
Burleigh Grimes

slobes
04-14-2007, 06:55 PM
The Diamondbacks intentionally walked Bonds with the bases loaded before. I want to say it was in 1998.

Yeah it was kn 1998, and it was the bottom of the 9th inning too. Diamondbacks winning 8-6 with 2 out in the bottom of the 9th, they IBB Bonds, and Brent Maybe got out to end the game.

Grzegorz
04-14-2007, 10:35 PM
In my lifetime it's easy: Bob Gibson.

Brian26
04-14-2007, 10:55 PM
Al Hrabosky

Good call. I'll also add Sparky Lyle.

Daver
04-14-2007, 11:22 PM
Frank Robinson was a good hitter, but he scared the crap out of pitchers, it was well known you couldn't throw at him, if you did he would step back in the box and aim the next one straight up the middle.

Nellie_Fox
04-15-2007, 02:45 AM
Frank Robinson was a good hitter, but he scared the crap out of pitchers, it was well known you couldn't throw at him, if you did he would step back in the box and aim the next one straight up the middle.When George Bell was with the Sox, he was doing a rehab from a knee injury with the South Bend White Sox. I was at a game in Batavia when they were playing the Kane County Cougars. Bell got dusted by some chin music; he got up, wagged his finger at the pitcher, and the very next pitch he rifled straight up the middle, making the pitcher hit the dirt.

PaulDrake
04-15-2007, 10:47 AM
Frank Robinson was a good hitter, but he scared the crap out of pitchers, it was well known you couldn't throw at him, if you did he would step back in the box and aim the next one straight up the middle. He was also a terrifying site barreling into second to break up the double play.

Jacob Nelson Fox
04-15-2007, 10:21 PM
Good call on Gibson, Drysdale, and Frank Robinson (a very, very tough man in his prime).

Has anyone mentioned Ryne Duren, Yankee reliever in the 50's? Threw 100 mph, couldn't see past his nose, didn't know where the ball was headed and didn't particularly care about the batter's well being.....yikes!

D. TODD
04-16-2007, 02:49 PM
Harmon Killebrew

Goose Gossage

Mike Schmidt

Chez
04-16-2007, 03:00 PM
Has anyone mentioned Ryne Duren, Yankee reliever in the 50's? Threw 100 mph, couldn't see past his nose, didn't know where the ball was headed and didn't particularly care about the batter's well being.....yikes!

I mentioned him earlier -- based solely on my dad's stories of attending Sox v. Yanks games in the 40's and 50's!

Fenway
04-16-2007, 03:18 PM
Good call on Gibson, Drysdale, and Frank Robinson (a very, very tough man in his prime).

Has anyone mentioned Ryne Duren, Yankee reliever in the 50's? Threw 100 mph, couldn't see past his nose, didn't know where the ball was headed and didn't particularly care about the batter's well being.....yikes!

and we found years later he was drunk on the mound more often than not :?:

Paulwny
04-16-2007, 03:32 PM
).

Has anyone mentioned Ryne Duren, Yankee reliever in the 50's? Threw 100 mph, couldn't see past his nose, didn't know where the ball was headed and didn't particularly care about the batter's well being.....yikes!

Good call on Duren. As Fenway has stated, Duren had a drinking problem, he wore coke bottle glasses and squinted at the plate, his first warm up pitch always hit the screen behind home plate, Berra or Howard would always mention to the ump and batter that Duren was out late last night and was hung over, all this combined with the rumor that in the minors he had hit the on deck batter with a pitch made Duren one of the most feared pitchers in the AL.

ode to veeck
04-16-2007, 09:29 PM
I would have put Gibson at the top of the list without even looking.
Also a good call on Goose Gossage in his prime-the man who broke his hand fighting with his own team mate in the clubhouse