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View Full Version : What's the call on a blown ball?


soxstarter
04-10-2007, 06:54 AM
It is probable that this move would only happen in the movies but......

What if the ball was hit so hard that it blew the cover off and the ball itself fell apart?

Would it be a homerun......?????

Nellie_Fox
04-10-2007, 11:26 AM
:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

jabrch
04-10-2007, 11:36 AM
:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

I'm with you Nellie.

IlliniSox4Life
04-10-2007, 11:45 AM
"thanks, here's fifty bucks"

ILuvThatDuck
04-10-2007, 11:45 AM
It is probable that this move would only happen in the movies but......

What if the ball was hit so hard that it blew the cover off and the ball itself fell apart?

Would it be a homerun......?????


Team hitting the ball wins...................forever.

itsnotrequired
04-10-2007, 11:55 AM
It is probable that this move would only happen in the movies but......

What if the ball was hit so hard that it blew the cover off and the ball itself fell apart?

Would it be a homerun......?????

All kidding aside, I believe it would be a dead ball.

soxfan13
04-10-2007, 12:04 PM
All kidding aside, I believe it would be a dead ball.


why would it be dead? the ball would still be in play just the cover would be gone:tongue:

HotelWhiteSox
04-10-2007, 12:04 PM
"thanks, here's fifty bucks"


:rolling:

voodoochile
04-10-2007, 12:07 PM
All kidding aside, I believe it would be a dead ball.

What if the cover landed in foul ground while the rest of it unraveled completely landing in fair territory except for the core which ended up in the LF bleachers? What if at the same time, a part of the string that unraveled landed in the SS mitt? What if one of the stitches bounced off the runner leading off of second base?

itsnotrequired
04-10-2007, 12:08 PM
What if the cover landed in foul ground while the rest of it unraveled completely landing in fair territory except for the core which ended up in the LF bleachers? What if at the same time, a part of the string that unraveled landed in the SS mitt? What if one of the stitches bounced off the runner leading off of second base?

If this happened, baseball would be cancelled forever.

doublem23
04-10-2007, 12:10 PM
You guys need to lay off the Brain Tonic.

http://www.nbadraft.net/actor/kengriffeyjrsimpsons.jpg

baaadbobbyjenks
04-10-2007, 12:15 PM
What if the cover landed in foul ground while the rest of it unraveled completely landing in fair territory except for the core which ended up in the LF bleachers? What if at the same time, a part of the string that unraveled landed in the SS mitt? What if one of the stitches bounced off the runner leading off of second base?

That's the hardest I've laughed all day.

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 12:22 PM
What if the cover landed in foul ground while the rest of it unraveled completely landing in fair territory except for the core which ended up in the LF bleachers? What if at the same time, a part of the string that unraveled landed in the SS mitt? What if one of the stitches bounced off the runner leading off of second base?
That would violate the laws of physics. If there is no intervening force, the ball, or what is left of it, woud continue to travel in the direction was headed. Since the ball's cover came off in foul territory, it cannot change course and head back over to fair territory unless something, or someone, makes contact with it causing it to alter course.

To put it more succinctly:
E=V@*23/43=T+6^y where T is the ball and V is the Earth's rotation.

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 12:24 PM
Seriously, I looked up the answer on the Internet. Here is what I found:

1. If the ball was hit by A-Rod, there will be a special edition of Baseball Tonight to celebrate the cover being torn off the ball.
2. If the ball was hit by a mere mortal, it is a dead ball and nobody notices.

Hokiesox
04-10-2007, 12:24 PM
Kidding aside (though this is a very funny question, and even better responses), I think the average life of a baseball in the major leagues is less than 10 pitches. Given that, it's impossible to happen. Hitting the ball hard doesn't tear a stitch. It puts a rather large dent in the ball, but the stitches are unharmed.

voodoochile
04-10-2007, 12:25 PM
That would violate the laws of physics. If there is no intervening force, the ball, or what is left of it, woud continue to travel in the direction was headed. Since the ball's cover came off in foul territory, it cannot change course and head back over to fair territory unless something, or someone, makes contact with it causing it to alter course.

To put it more succinctly:
E=V@*23/43=T+6^y where T is the ball and V is the Earth's rotation.

You are discounting wind dynamics and friction. The cover would be lighter with more surface area than the rest of the items, so it might catch a gust of wind and be blown foul down the LF line. The core itself would have little wind resistance. The string might end up both fair and foul. The stitches could end up anywhere the wind carries them.

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 12:26 PM
You are discounting wind dynamics and friction. The cover would be lighter with more surface area than the rest of the items, so it might catch a gust of wind and be blown foul down the LF line. The core itself would have little wind resistance. The string might end up both fair and foul. The stitches could end up anywhere the wind carries them.
*Smacks himself on forehead* You're right! I completely forgot that variable. That is why you get published in the International Physics Review Journal more often than I do.

Domeshot17
04-10-2007, 12:26 PM
I do believe you would need a friend with limited baseball knowledge with a father who has a ball signed by some girl named baby ruth. Then he would have to go steal it, but you might have to fight a big dog for it. I think you need some PF Flyers involved too.

doublem23
04-10-2007, 12:26 PM
That would violate the laws of physics. If there is no intervening force, the ball, or what is left of it, woud continue to travel in the direction was headed. Since the ball's cover came off in foul territory, it cannot change course and head back over to fair territory unless something, or someone, makes contact with it causing it to alter course.

To put it more succinctly:
E=V@*23/43=T+6^y where T is the ball and V is the Earth's rotation.

This is all well and good, but you are disregarding the possibility of a second ball courtesy of the man on the grassy knoll.

itsnotrequired
04-10-2007, 12:27 PM
You are discounting wind dynamics and friction. The cover would be lighter with more surface area than the rest of the items, so it might catch a gust of wind and be blown foul down the LF line. The core itself would have little wind resistance. The string might end up both fair and foul. The stitches could end up anywhere the wind carries them.

But what if the game was played in a vacuum?

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 12:30 PM
But what if the game was played in a vacuum?
Then E=g^/3. Much more simple.

voodoochile
04-10-2007, 12:35 PM
But what if the game was played in a vacuum?

All the players and fans would be dead.

That (of course) leads to the next question...

If a baseball gets blown up on contact with the bat and no one is alive to see it, does ESPN cover it?

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 12:41 PM
All the players and fans would be dead.

That (of course) leads to the next question...

If a baseball gets blown up on contact with the bat and no one is alive to see it, does ESPN cover it?
ESPN regularly does stories about how the Cubs think this is the year they will make the World Series.

So, the answer is "yes," they do cover that which is never witnessed by human eyes.

goofymsfan
04-10-2007, 12:43 PM
And here I thought by the title of the thread it was going to be on blowing the ball to make it go out of bounds.

soxfan13
04-10-2007, 12:49 PM
And here I thought by the title of the thread it was going to be on blowing the ball to make it go out of bounds.

Thats too easy :smile: but i like the old Lenny Randle reference

voodoochile
04-10-2007, 12:51 PM
And here I thought by the title of the thread it was going to be on blowing the ball to make it go out of bounds.

I've seen that in a game, it's considered contact with the ball in fair territory.

TDog
04-10-2007, 12:57 PM
This is all well and good, but you are disregarding the possibility of a second ball courtesy of the man on the grassy knoll.


Or a drunk in the bleachers, just beyond the ivy and basket.

I'm not sure if there is anything in the baseball rules that addresses this, but there is a rule that require umpires to make rulings they believe are correct situations where the ruling is not found in the rule book. I'm guessing that a ball that disintegrates in play in fair territory would be ruled out of play, probably as a ground rule double, if there is no question that it was fair.

In extraordinary cases, baseball rules aren't that different from American law. An umpire makes a decision to fill in the gaps of the rules. If it affects the outcome of the game, the commissioner's office might review the ruling. If the ruling holds up, it becomes "case law" for the remainder of the season and until the rules committee address the matter.

Chicken Dinner
04-10-2007, 12:59 PM
Rawlings would lose the contract to supply the balls for MLB.:rolleyes:

ILuvThatDuck
04-10-2007, 01:01 PM
But what if the game was played in a vacuum?

That would suck. :duck:

soxfan13
04-10-2007, 01:03 PM
That would suck. :duck::kneeslap: :kneeslap:

SOX ADDICT '73
04-10-2007, 01:32 PM
If a baseball gets blown up on contact with the bat and no one is alive to see it, does ESPN cover it?
Only if the batter is anyone from the Yankees or Red Sox.

Or Joe Mauer.

Or AJ Pierzynski, since then it would have to be cheating of some kind.

soxstarter
04-10-2007, 04:32 PM
You are discounting wind dynamics and friction. The cover would be lighter with more surface area than the rest of the items, so it might catch a gust of wind and be blown foul down the LF line. The core itself would have little wind resistance. The string might end up both fair and foul. The stitches could end up anywhere the wind carries them.

Okay, you guys have entertained (and I say that with two meanings) this theory seriously, so to expand on the question......

How much force (per pound) would have to be exerted in order to drive this ball, creating "the blown ball scenario" and who would be the most likely Sox player (or any player) to accomplish this feat? :D:

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 04:39 PM
Okay, you guys have entertained (and I say that with two meanings) this theory seriously, so to expand on the question......

How much force (per pound) would have to be exerted in order to drive this ball, creating "the blown ball scenario" and who would be the most likely Sox player (or any player) to accomplish this feat? :D:
We're going to change your title from "WSI Personality" to "WSI High School Physics Teacher."

soxstarter
04-10-2007, 05:07 PM
Just call me Sox-Edison-Starter.

But seriously....surely we have some rocket scientists that are on this site. After all....this is not a Cubs fan site :wink:. C'mon guys....weigh in here!

BiggestFan14
04-10-2007, 05:13 PM
I did that to a ball once in little league...

TDog
04-10-2007, 05:36 PM
I did that to a ball once in little league...


Now that I think about it, when I was 12 or 13, there were baseballs being sold at the Ribordy Drugs store down the street in Munster. They were inexpensive and Joe DiMaggio's picture was on the box endorsing them. I don't remember if they were called Joe DiMaggio balls or we labeled them that because of his endorsement, but we were kids, and they seemed like a good deal.

After you hit them, we noticed, they became lopsided. They didn't travel as far as "official league balls" that were used by organized leagues in the area. Our first little game ended abruptly when the ball burst open and garbage -- old plastic wrappers bearing Japanese writing -- flew out. We didn't have another ball, so the game was over. I don't remember whether they gave me credit for a hit on the play.

All I remember was Joe DiMaggio being hated by the kids in my neighborhood because of his crappy balls.

Scottiehaswheels
04-10-2007, 05:43 PM
Now that I think about it, when I was 12 or 13, there were baseballs being sold at the Ribordy Drugs store down the street in Munster. They were inexpensive and Joe DiMaggio's picture was on the box endorsing them. I don't remember if they were called Joe DiMaggio balls or we labeled them that because of his endorsement, but we were kids, and they seemed like a good deal.

After you hit them, we noticed, they became lopsided. They didn't travel as far as "official league balls" that were used by organized leagues in the area. Our first little game ended abruptly when the ball burst open and garbage -- old plastic wrappers bearing Japanese writing -- flew out. We didn't have another ball, so the game was over. I don't remember whether they gave me credit for a hit on the play.

All I remember was Joe DiMaggio being hated by the kids in my neighborhood because of his crappy balls.Great story... Just looked on ebay for one... See mitts with his name on them that look like crap too... Pleather or something...

http://i16.ebayimg.com/03/i/000/97/94/b0cf_1.JPG

Chisox353014
04-10-2007, 08:02 PM
Is it too late for this thread to be entered in that Greatest WSI Thread of All Time Contest in the Parking Lot?

tebman
04-10-2007, 08:02 PM
Okay, you guys have entertained (and I say that with two meanings) this theory seriously, so to expand on the question......

How much force (per pound) would have to be exerted in order to drive this ball, creating "the blown ball scenario" and who would be the most likely Sox player (or any player) to accomplish this feat? :D:
I have a book titled The Physics of Baseball by Robert Adair, Ph.D. that talks about those forces. While it doesn't describe the amount of force to tear a ball apart, it does say this:
Very large forces are required to change the motion of the 5-1/8 ounce ball from a speed of 90 mph toward the plate to a speed of 110 mph toward the center-field bleachers in the 1/1000 of a second of bat-ball contact. Hence, for a long home run, the force on the ball reaches a value near 9000 pounds, with an equal reactive force on the bat. Such forces distort bat and ball: The ball is compressed to about half of its original diameter, the bat is compressed about 1/25 as much.

I'm guessing that the 9000 pounds of force in 1/1000 of a second squeezing the ball to half its diameter is absorbed by the stitching, which allows the ball to flex. But if a major league ball only lasts for a maximum of 10 pitches, there isn't enough cumulative damage done to the ball to weaken it enough to come apart.

Balls on the playground, though, might be used for months or years, and so it's not unusual to see them frayed and unraveled after hundreds or thousands of whacks from a bat.

But hey, it made great scene in "The Natural"! :tongue:

Dan the Man
04-10-2007, 08:21 PM
Balls on the playground, though, might be used for months or years, and so it's not unusual to see them frayed and unraveled after hundreds or thousands of whacks from a bat.

But hey, it made great scene in "The Natural"! :tongue:

Don't forget that epic homerun by catcher Triscuit Messmer in Angels in the Outfield.

Frontman
04-10-2007, 10:43 PM
What if the cover landed in foul ground while the rest of it unraveled completely landing in fair territory except for the core which ended up in the LF bleachers? What if at the same time, a part of the string that unraveled landed in the SS mitt? What if one of the stitches bounced off the runner leading off of second base?


5290
"My office refrains from comment, as this does not prove or disprove the use of performance enhancement drugs in major league baseball."

DumpJerry
04-10-2007, 10:54 PM
This thread is proof positive that the White Sox have the smartest fans in the world. How many other teams have fan websites where they high-level discussions about physics?:cool:

soxstarter
04-11-2007, 07:47 AM
This thread is proof positive that the White Sox have the smartest fans in the world. How many other teams have fan websites where they high-level discussions about physics?:cool:

Well Said!:thumbsup:

gobears1987
04-11-2007, 10:42 AM
Kidding aside (though this is a very funny question, and even better responses), I think the average life of a baseball in the major leagues is less than 10 pitches. Given that, it's impossible to happen. Hitting the ball hard doesn't tear a stitch. It puts a rather large dent in the ball, but the stitches are unharmed.
The life of a ball is actually 7 pitches. It was a question on trivial pursuit.

Before 1920, I am very sure the cover being torn off the ball was a regular occurance since they used the ball until it fell apart. They then changed the rules following the death of Ray Chapman

steveironcity
04-12-2007, 05:02 PM
You guys need to lay off the Brain Tonic.

http://www.nbadraft.net/actor/kengriffeyjrsimpsons.jpg


Good lord!!! Gigantism!!!!!