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View Full Version : RIP Bowie Kuhn


Fenway
03-15-2007, 05:20 PM
Peter Gammons on WEEI just said former MLB commish Bowie Kuhn died today

soxinem1
03-15-2007, 05:29 PM
Not exactly my favorite commish, but never the less, a loss for the game.

PKalltheway
03-15-2007, 11:52 PM
Wow, didn't hear about this. Baseball has lost one of its historic figures. RIP.

Mohoney
03-16-2007, 05:11 AM
I disagreed with a lot of the things he did, but I will always appreciate that he gave his all into fostering the growth of a game I love.

I appreciate it, Bowie. God bless.

soxfanatlanta
03-16-2007, 09:04 AM
I disagreed with a lot of the things he did, but I will always appreciate that he gave his all into fostering the growth of a game I love.

I appreciate it, Bowie. God bless.

IIRC, he is credited with blocking the sale of the Sox to Ed DeBartolo and moving the team to New Orleans. For that, I am grateful.

Fenway
03-16-2007, 09:38 AM
http://www.nypost.com/seven/03162007/photos/sports120.jpg

NY Times obit (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/16/sports/baseball/16kuhn.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1)

Upon losing his bid for a third term, Kuhn summed up his perception of the commissioner’s mandate in offering advice for his successor.

“He’ll be told, for instance, that legalized gambling and baseball are perfectly compatible and that we can even turn a profit from the relationship,” Kuhn wrote in The New York Times. “He should tell the compromisers to get lost. They are burglars of our patrimony. They will never understand the threat to baseball posed by such things as legalized gambling, sports betting, drug abuse and undesirable associations. He should use his powers fearlessly to protect the integrity of the game. The critics will call him self-righteous and moralistic. Have courage. Ignore them.”



from Bill Madden in the NY Daily News

Kuhn's clashes with Steinbrenner likewise were legendary. Steinbrenner had not even owned the Yankees for a year when, in November 1974, Kuhn suspended him for two years after his federal conviction for illegal campaign contributions to Richard Nixon. Although he lifted the suspension after one year, Kuhn fined Steinbrenner nearly $400,000 over the next 10 years for numerous transgressions, including $5,000 in 1979 for tampering with Angels outfielder Brian Downing and, most notably, a total of $300,000 for The Boss' activities in the aftermath of the notorious 1983 Pine Tar Game. "I offer my condolences to the family," Steinbrenner said in a statement. "He was a good guy and I admired him. Even though we've had disagreements over the years, I never lost my respect for his integrity."

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball/2007/03/16/2007-03-16_bye_bye_bowie.html

from Mike Vaccaro in the New York Post

BUFFALO - Nobody recognized him. That was the shocking part. This was five years ago, a summer night in Newark, and Bowie Kuhn was watching a minor-league baseball game and doing it in complete, blissful anonymity, chomping on a hot dog, sipping from a cup of soda.

"Does anyone ever ask you for your autograph?" he was asked. "Nobody asks a lawyer for his autograph," he said, laughing.


http://www.nypost.com/seven/03162007/sports/goodbye__bowie_sports_mike_vaccaro.htm

PaulDrake
03-16-2007, 11:36 AM
IIRC, he is credited with blocking the sale of the Sox to Ed DeBartolo and moving the team to New Orleans. For that, I am grateful. I'm going strictly on memory, I have no notes or links to back me up. De Bartolo Sr. did express an interest in moving a team to the Superdome. The retro stadium thing wasn't even a dream yet, and big shots were still enamored with cookie cutter stadiums and domes. By the time DeBartolo made his bid to buy the Sox he was gung ho to bring a winner to Chicago, at the very least he strongly professed as much. I remember driving in the Loop and listening to an interview with DeBartolo Sr and Harry Caray just like it was yesterday. Kuhn conducted a powerful behind the scenes campaign against DeBartolo. It was assumed that he was mobbed up. DeBartolo came from Youngstown, Ohio. In the 50s and 60s it was known by the quaint nickname "Bombtown USA". To me, Cicero, Illinois was Mayberry RFD compared to Youngstown. In any case, the first time DeBartolo's bid to buy the Sox came up for vote, it was 8-6 in favor of him. I can't remember if he needed 2/3 or 3/4 approval, but in any case the second vote was 11-3 against DeBartolo, opening the door for Reinsdorf and Einhorn. DeBartolo's operation had a highly successful run with the 49ers (I know Jr. messed some things up) and brought the Pittsburgh Penguins their first Stanley Cup ever in 1991. In the interest of full disclosure, I'm the grandson of Italian immigrants on my mother's side, but I do think DeBartolo got short shrift from Bowie Kuhn and the American League. As for Bowie, he lived a reasonably long life filled with accomplishment, and may be rest in peace.

tick53
03-16-2007, 11:43 AM
I didn't agree with everything Mr Kuhn did, especially the Debartolo blocking of the Sox sale, but rest in peace sir.

tick53
03-16-2007, 11:44 AM
I'm going strictly on memory, I have no notes or links to back me up. De Bartolo Sr. did express an interest in moving a team to the Superdome. The retro stadium thing wasn't even a dream yet, and big shots were still enamored with cookie cutter stadiums and domes. By the time DeBartolo made his bid to buy the Sox he was gung ho to bring a winner to Chicago, at the very least he strongly professed as much. I remember driving in the Loop and listening to an interview with DeBartolo Sr and Harry Caray just like it was yesterday. Kuhn conducted a powerful behind the scenes campaign against DeBartolo. It was assumed that he was mobbed up. DeBartolo came from Youngstown, Ohio. In the 50s and 60s it was known by the quaint nickname "Bombtown USA". To me, Cicero, Illinois was Mayberry RFD compared to Youngstown. In any case, the first time DeBartolo's bid to buy the Sox came up for vote, it was 8-6 in favor of him. I can't remember if he needed 2/3 or 3/4 approval, but in any case the second vote was 11-3 against DeBartolo, opening the door for Reinsdorf and Einhorn. DeBartolo's operation had a highly successful run with the 49ers (I know Jr. messed some things up) and brought the Pittsburgh Penguins their first Stanley Cup ever in 1991. In the interest of full disclosure, I'm the grandson of Italian immigrants on my mother's side, but I do think DeBartolo got short shrift from Bowie Kuhn and the American League. As for Bowie, he lived a reasonably long life filled with accomplishment, and may be rest in peace.

Your memory is pretty good.

vegyrex
03-16-2007, 11:48 AM
IIRC, he is credited with blocking the sale of the Sox to Ed DeBartolo and moving the team to New Orleans. For that, I am grateful.

Same for me.

RIP Mr. Kuhn.

johnr1note
03-16-2007, 12:23 PM
I'm going strictly on memory, I have no notes or links to back me up. De Bartolo Sr. did express an interest in moving a team to the Superdome. The retro stadium thing wasn't even a dream yet, and big shots were still enamored with cookie cutter stadiums and domes. By the time DeBartolo made his bid to buy the Sox he was gung ho to bring a winner to Chicago, at the very least he strongly professed as much. I remember driving in the Loop and listening to an interview with DeBartolo Sr and Harry Caray just like it was yesterday. Kuhn conducted a powerful behind the scenes campaign against DeBartolo. It was assumed that he was mobbed up. DeBartolo came from Youngstown, Ohio. In the 50s and 60s it was known by the quaint nickname "Bombtown USA". To me, Cicero, Illinois was Mayberry RFD compared to Youngstown. In any case, the first time DeBartolo's bid to buy the Sox came up for vote, it was 8-6 in favor of him. I can't remember if he needed 2/3 or 3/4 approval, but in any case the second vote was 11-3 against DeBartolo, opening the door for Reinsdorf and Einhorn. DeBartolo's operation had a highly successful run with the 49ers (I know Jr. messed some things up) and brought the Pittsburgh Penguins their first Stanley Cup ever in 1991. In the interest of full disclosure, I'm the grandson of Italian immigrants on my mother's side, but I do think DeBartolo got short shrift from Bowie Kuhn and the American League. As for Bowie, he lived a reasonably long life filled with accomplishment, and may be rest in peace.

It wasn't only Kuhn that blocked the sale to DeBartolo -- it was a cabal of AL East owners, with Steinbrenner and Edward Bennett Williams at the helm. They wanted to keep the White Sox in Chicago -- they didn't want to lose Chicago as an AL market, but they also didn't want the White Sox to be competitive. I believe the blocking of the sale to DeBartolo was as much an effort to keep the White Sox a second division club and fodder for the Yankees and O's to beat up on as it was anything else.

Fenway
03-16-2007, 12:31 PM
It is not as well known nationally but Kuhn also worked to prevent Dominic DiMaggio from buying the Red Sox in 1977 from Tom Yawkey's estate.

At that point Jean Yawkey bought the team herself and lent Haywood Sullivan and Buddy LeRioux the money to join her.

During the 3 day rain delay of the 1975 World Series Bowie made this statement


"I am pleased to report that it has stopped raining in New Jersey"

Medford Bobby
03-16-2007, 12:55 PM
His epitaph will say : "Always for the best interest of baseball" :(:

ode to veeck
03-16-2007, 02:09 PM
His epitaph will say : "Always for the best interest of baseball" :(:

After he cancelled the A's fire sale on Charlie Finley, long time In the Wake of the News columnist Dave Conden never wrote a kind word about him again and subsequently always referred to him as Bowie "in the best interests of baseball" Khun.

esbrechtel
03-17-2007, 01:54 AM
Hawk had some good stories about him during the broadcast today...

caracascat
03-19-2007, 12:51 PM
The man had integrity. This steriod bull would not have happened under his watch, like it did under the unethical Bud Selig