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StatManDu
12-10-2006, 02:32 PM
21 years ago today, the White Sox plucked a little-known outfielder from the Pirate minor league system named Bobby Bonilla. Here are some other “notables” who spent time with the Sox or had an affiliation with the Sox. Feel free to add on, update, correct, etc.

Chief Bender: After eight years out of the game, the future Hall of Fame pitcher appeared in one game for the Sox on July 21, 1925. He gave up two runs, including a homer, in the first game of a doubleheader at Comiskey Park.

Bobby Bonds: Barry’s dad was acquired by the Sox after the 1977 season. … Quickly dealt to Texas just 26 forgetful games into his Sox career.

Bobby Bonilla: Switch-hitter made his big league debut for the 1986 Sox after being a Rule 5 pick from the Pittsburgh organization. … Returned to the Pirates for pitcher Jose DeLeon later in the season where he became an offensive force. … How would his bat have looked in front or behind Harold Baines in the late 1980s?

Ray Boone: The patriarch of the baseball-playing Boone family toiled for the Sox in 1958 and 1959.

Joe Borowski: Sweaty saves leader for the infamous 2003 Cubs, Borowski was the Sox 32nd round pick in the June 1989 draft. He pitched in 1990 at the Sox Rookie League affiliate at Sarasota, going 2-8 with a 5.58 ERA in 12 games (11 starts). He was traded to Baltimore on March 31, 1991 for Pete Rose Jr.

Frank Chance: First baseman in Cubs’ fabled double play combination was ready to manage to the Sox in 1924 but couldn’t start the season. … Sox then turned to Johnny Evers, the second baseman in the DP combo to manage.

Jocko Conlan: Outfielder for the Sox in 1934-1935. … Became a Hall of Fame umpire after his playing days.

Dave Debusschere: NBA star of the 1960s and 1970s pitched for the Sox in 1962 and 1963, going 3-4 with a 2.90 ERA in 36 games (10 starts) … Ron Reed and Steve Hamilton were also among Sox players who played in the NBA.

Lee Elia: He of the famous tirade broke in as a shortstop for the Sox in 1966. … Played in 80 games for the 1966 Sox, hitting .205 with three homers and 22 RBIs. … Sold to the Cubs on May 23, 1967.

Johnny Evers: Famed member of the Cubs’ double play combo played in one game for the 1922 Sox. … He managed the Sox for part of 1924, going 41-61, before leaving the team because of illness.

Gary Gaetti: Twins’ third baseman of the 1980s was the Sox third round pick of the secondary phase of the June 1978 draft but did not sign.

Eric Gagne: Dodgers’ record-setting closer was the Sox 30th round pick in the 1994 draft out of Mascouche Quebec Canada but he did not sign. … Eventually signed with the Dodgers as a non-drafted free agent July 26, 1995.

Tom Gorzelanny: Evergreen Park, Ill., native was the Sox 38th round pick in the June 2000 draft out of Marist High School but he did not sign. … Left-handed pitcher signed with Pirates after being their second round pick in 2003. … Showed promise by going 2-5 with a 3.79 ERA in 11 starts for the ’06 Bucs.

Billy Joe Hobert: Future NFL quarterback was the White Sox 16th round pick in the June 1993 draft out of the University of Washington. … Never played college baseball. … The left-handed hitting outfielder was given a non-roster invitation to spring training in 1994 after hitting .256 with four RBIs in 15 games at the Sox Rookie League affiliate at Sarasota in 1993. … Hobert went to quarterback 29 games in the NFL for Oakland, Buffalo and New Orleans between 1995 and 1998. Most famous for admitting he didn’t thoroughly prepare for a 1997 Bills’ game against New England in which two of his first three passes were intercepted. He was quickly cut.

Don Larsen: Fired perfect game for the Yankees in the 1956 World Series … Pitched for the 1961 Sox going 7-2 with a 4.12 ERA. Also hit .320 with a homer and four RBIs. … Traded after the season to the Giants in the Billy Pierce.

Archie Manning: Quarterback for Saints, Oilers and Vikings in the 1970s and 1980s … Drafted twice by the Sox in the early 1970s as a shortstop out of the University of Mississippi but never signed.

Denny McLain: Future 30-game for Detroit was winner was signed by the White Sox as an amateur free agent in 1962 out of Chicago’s Mount Carmel High School. … He pitched in 18 games at Harlan of the Appalachian League and Clinton of the Midwest League – both Sox affiliates – in 1962, going 5-8 with a 2.97 ERA. … The following April he was placed on first-year waivers because rules of the day stated organization’s could only keep one first-year bonus players. The Sox opted to keep Bruce Howard. … McLain was claimed by Detroit April 8, 1963.

Freddie Mitchell: The White Sox 50th round pick (and last) in the 2000 draft as an outfielder out of UCLA. … Did not sign. … Philadelphia Eagles’ first round pick out of UCLA in 2001 … Colorful and controversial receiver caught 90 passes for 1,263 yards (14.0 average) and five touchdowns for the Eagles from 2001 to 2005.

Placido Polanco: MVP of the 2006 American League Championship Series for the Tigers was the Sox 49th round (and final) pick in the 1993 draft but he did not sign. … Drafted as a second baseman out of Miami Dade Community College. … Eventually drafted and signed by the Cardinals in 1994.

Pete Rose Jr.: The son of baseball’s “Hit King” spent parts of four seasons in the White Sox minor league system in the 1990s. “Petey” was acquired from Baltimore for fellow minor leaguer Joe Borowski on March 31, 1991. Rose’s best season in the Sox chain was 1995 at Class-A South Bend when he hit .277 with four homers and 65 RBIs. His career with the Sox peaked at Double-A Birmingham in 1996 where he hit .243 with three homers and 44 RBIs.

Mickey Rivers: Fleet-footed outfielder was the White Sox first round pick in the January 1968 free agent draft but he did not sign … Eventually drafted and signed by Washington and traded to California where he made his Major League debut. … Turned out to be the catalyst for the three-time pennant-winning and two-time World Champion Yankee teams of the mid-1970s. … How good would this guy have looked patrolling Comiskey Park in the 1970s?

Bill Robinson: Pittsburgh Pirate offensive stalwart of the 1970s … Acquired by the Sox in a trade with the Yankees in 1970 … Never played with Sox.

Edd Roush: The “greatest Red who ever lived” and future Hall of Famer made his big league debut with the White Sox on Aug. 20, 1913. … Roush, an outfielder, jumped to the Federal League and played for the Reds from 1917 to 1926, the Giants from 1927 to 1929 and the Reds in 1931.

Red Ruffing: Hall of Fame pitcher concluded his 23-year career with the 1947 White Sox … Four-time 20-game winner with the Yankees … 3-5 with a 6.11 ERA in nine appearances for the 1947 Sox.

Cary Schueler: White Sox general manager Ron Schueler made his daughter the team’s 43rd round pick in 1993 draft out of Campolindo High School in Moraga, Calif., where played junior varsity baseball as a sophomore. She didn’t sign, opting to play basketball at DePaul. … Among the players she was drafted ahead of were Jason Maxwell and Frank Menechino both of whom later played in the Major Leagues.

Everett Scott: The first “iron man.” … Shortstop played in a record 1,307 consecutive games from June 20, 1916 to May 6, 1925, a mark later broken by Lou Gehrig and then Cal Ripken Jr. … Played in 40 games for the 1926 White Sox.

Jeff Weaver: White Sox second round pick in the June 1997 draft … Right-hander out of Fresno State did not sign. … He went back to school and was picked in the first round (14th overall) by the Tigers in the next draft.

Earl Webb: Set single season record with an amazing 67 doubles for the 1931 Red Sox. … Had a cup of coffee with the 1933 White Sox.

Bob Wickman: White Sox second round pick in the 1990 draft out of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. … Right-handed pitcher advanced as far as Double-A Birmingham before he was dealt to the New York Yankees with fellow pitcher Melido Perez and Domingo Jean for second baseman Steve Sax on Jan. 10, 1992.

TDog
12-10-2006, 03:49 PM
You left out Steve Carlton, who, unlike some of the people on your list -- including the ones who never played major league baseball -- actually did play for the White Sox.

eastchicagosoxfan
12-10-2006, 04:02 PM
You left out Steve Carlton, who, unlike some of the people on your list -- including the ones who never played major league baseball -- actually did play for the White Sox.
As did Dave Stieb. He killed us when he pitched for the Blue Jays.

buehrle4cy05
12-10-2006, 04:09 PM
You forgot Brian Daubach.

StatManDu
12-10-2006, 04:10 PM
My original list was too long for this forum so I had to cut out my "others" and Ron Blomberg. Here's the rest.

Ron Blomberg: The first DH in the history of Major League Baseball with the Yankees in 1973 ended his injury-shortened career for the 1978 Sox.

AND

Others: Cleon Jones, Steve Stone, Tim Stoddard, “Blue Moon” Odom, Dave Righetti, Dave Stieb, Tony Pena, Phil Cavaretta, Ron Santo, George Foster, Steve Carlton, Jose Canseco, Jim Brosnan, Jim Abbott, Sparky Lyle, Tom Seaver, Turner Gil, Hart Lee Dykes, Larry Doby Jr., Mark Reese (Pee Wee’s son), Tim McLain (Denny’s brother).

TornLabrum
12-10-2006, 05:40 PM
How could you put Blue Moon Odom, a man who pitched a shared no-hitter with the Sox, in the "other" list??????

Chips
12-10-2006, 05:45 PM
My original list was too long for this forum so I had to cut out my "others" and Ron Blomberg. Here's the rest.

Ron Blomberg: The first DH in the history of Major League Baseball with the Yankees in 1973 ended his injury-shortened career for the 1978 Sox.

AND

Others: Cleon Jones, Steve Stone, Tim Stoddard, “Blue Moon” Odom, Dave Righetti, Dave Stieb, Tony Pena, Phil Cavaretta, Ron Santo, George Foster, Steve Carlton, Jose Canseco, Jim Brosnan, Jim Abbott, Sparky Lyle, Tom Seaver, Turner Gil, Hart Lee Dykes, Larry Doby Jr., Mark Reese (Pee Wee’s son), Tim McLain (Denny’s brother).



How could you put Blue Moon Odom, a man who pitched a shared no-hitter with the Sox, in the "other" list??????

How can he put Jose Canseco in the "other" list??????????

:bashbro:canseco

Chips

santo=dorf
12-10-2006, 05:58 PM
What exactly was Schueler's motivation for drafting his daughter? :?: Brendan Donnelly is another guy the Sox drafted.

FedEx227
12-10-2006, 06:10 PM
What exactly was Schueler's motivation for drafting his daughter? :?: Brendan Donnelly is another guy the Sox drafted.

What an absolute waste of a pick...

Daver
12-10-2006, 06:26 PM
What exactly was Schueler's motivation for drafting his daughter? :?:

Arrogance and ignorance.

StatManDu
12-10-2006, 06:52 PM
Donnelly is a good one. I should have included that.

This is a subjective list. The "others" were people I assumed most Sox fans were familiar with (odom), played regularly with the Sox (Seaver), too obscure (Doby Jr., Reese) or had played recently a la Canseco.

How about Schueler drafting his daughter but passing on Casey Fisk, an outfielder I believe at either Illinois State or UIC?

southwstchi4life
12-10-2006, 07:15 PM
I guess I should state an obvious one, As much as I dont want to
Sammy Sosa

StatManDu
12-10-2006, 07:17 PM
I left him off the list because that is an obvious. I was looking for the players that would surprise or raise an eyebrow

StatManDu
12-11-2006, 01:09 AM
Another one I deleted from my original post because of space on this forum:

Bob Kennedy: Cub general manager of the 1970s and 1980s played third base for the Sox in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s.

I should probably add Johnny Callison and Norm Cash to the list, too

Here's the udpated "others" list (thanks to the great posters on this board)

Others: Cleon Jones, Steve Stone, Tim Stoddard, “Blue Moon” Odom, Dave Righetti, Dave Stieb, Tony Pena, Phil Cavaretta, Rocky Colavito, Jeff Shaw, Ken Boyer, Ron Santo, George Foster, Steve Carlton, Jose Canseco, Jim Brosnan, Jim Abbott, Sparky Lyle, Tom Seaver, Turner Gil, Hart Lee Dykes, Larry Doby Jr., Mark Reese (Pee Wee’s son), Tim McLain (Denny’s brother).

jcw218
12-11-2006, 02:47 AM
You can add Tommy John to the list of players that played for the White Sox. He pitched for the Sox From 1965 through 1971.

Steelrod
12-11-2006, 06:07 AM
Donnelly is a good one. I should have included that.

This is a subjective list. The "others" were people I assumed most Sox fans were familiar with (odom), played regularly with the Sox (Seaver), too obscure (Doby Jr., Reese) or had played recently a la Canseco.

How about Schueler drafting his daughter but passing on Casey Fisk, an outfielder I believe at either Illinois State or UIC?
His daughter was a better athlete!
BTW Casey played at Illinois State, and I assume she was selected so she could show her children some day that she was drafted.

SouthSide_HitMen
12-11-2006, 08:38 AM
http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/4352/199402071jr4.jpg (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/)

SOXSINCE'70
12-11-2006, 08:59 AM
Arrogance and ignorance.

:schueler
"And I led the league in both,thank you very much".

Bucky F. Dent
12-11-2006, 09:03 AM
Unless I missed it, you forgot Rich "Goose" Gossage, the single most intimidating pitcher I have ever seen.
Drafted by the Sox in '70, and spent his first five years with the organization.


'70, btw, is the same year they drafted Bucky Dent, Jerry Hairston, and Terry Forster.

HAR-OLD
12-11-2006, 10:05 AM
danny tartabull

wilburaga
12-11-2006, 10:07 AM
Thumbing through an old (1964) Media Guide, I remember being surprised to see the mug of a young Rudy May, whom the Sox took from the Twins in the first year minor league draft in December of 1963, then traded after the '64 season to the Phillies for Bill Heath and Joel Gibson. May went on to record 152 wins for other organizations. Heath had one at bat fior the Sox and Gibson never saw a major league game.

As for Carey Schueler, two subsequent picks by the Sox in that 1993 draft made the majors, Frank Menechino and Mario Valdez, the 45th and 48th Sox picks respectively.

W

StatManDu
12-11-2006, 11:02 AM
Rudy May. Great one. I'll check up on that.

I also remembered Dennis "Oil Can" Boyd who was going to be a starting pitcher for the Sox strike team of 1995, a team I referred to as the Mock Sox.

Thanks

PaulDrake
12-11-2006, 11:55 AM
In addition to the already mentioned Rocky Colavito and Ken Boyer, the Sox also had another veteran retread on the 67 team. Jim O'Toole, south side native, and former star pitcher for the Reds pitched 54 1/3 innings in his hometown to finish out his career.

Paulwny
12-11-2006, 02:30 PM
Herb Score, the million $$$ pitcher.

1917
12-11-2006, 02:50 PM
I went to Mt. Carmel and never knew Denny McClain went there until recently...is he still in jail?

gowhitesox
12-14-2006, 02:11 AM
How about Tom Seaver, at least I didn't see him listed.

gowhitesox
12-14-2006, 02:14 AM
I went to Mt. Carmel and never knew Denny McClain went there until recently...is he still in jail?

Denny McLain is out Jail, he got out a couple of years ago. He was a good pitcher but he sure got himself in trouble big time.

soxstarter
12-14-2006, 08:03 AM
I love to hear these little known facts about the Sox.

I had no idea that Archie Manning was connected with the organization at one time or that he even played college ball at Ole Miss.

Great Thread, Keep'm coming!

downstairs
12-14-2006, 09:12 AM
How about Tom Seaver, at least I didn't see him listed.

I was just looking him and some other big-time players who had a cup of coffee with the Sox. (I know Seaver didn't- pitched some 70 games).

Another interesting list would be to take some hall of famers and see what teams had them and lost them. Seaver, for example was drafted by the Dodgers and Braves before the Mets...

hellenicsoxfan
12-14-2006, 05:52 PM
As did Dave Stieb. He killed us when he pitched for the Blue Jays.

He killed us when he pitched for the White Sox, too.

beebee richards
12-14-2006, 08:48 PM
http://www.footballcardgallery.com/pics/1971-Topps/54.jpg

TDog
12-15-2006, 03:33 PM
http://www.footballcardgallery.com/pics/1971-Topps/54.jpg


He tried out for the Sox. Minor leaguer Ron Kittle caught him that day, more or less. Douglass was so wild that he never played for the White Sox.

I didn't know they even had football cards.