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FielderJones
11-02-2006, 12:11 PM
From the horse's mouth (http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0611020201nov02,0,6488933.story). Given the long-time relationship, I wonder how a post-breakup Tribune would cover the Chicago baseball scene.

palehozenychicty
11-02-2006, 12:19 PM
Unless the staff dramatically changed for the newspaper, I doubt that it would be much different. Many of their staff writers/editors have been with the corporation for a long time and have ingested the kool-aid through their DNA. Secondly, I've been told by older fans/citizens that before the Tribune Corporation bought the Cubs, the bias was prevalent. If anyone can refute or confirm this, please do so.

tebman
11-02-2006, 01:37 PM
It's a fine mess they've gotten themselves into. The Tribune had grand plans for itself and jumped aboard the same buy-your-way-to-happiness wagon that Clear Channel company did. Now both companies are looking for private buyers and are gradually selling off pieces of their companies.

The Tribune figured that if it owned newspapers in New York, Chicago, and LA, along with other large papers in places like Baltimore and Orlando, it could forge ahead and buy TV stations in those cities and have an advertising juggernaut. The problem with that plan was that the FCC has had rules on the books for many years prohibiting one company from owning newspapers and TV stations in the same city. No problem, figured the Tribune, we're cozy with the FCC and they'll change the rules -- except it didn't happen and now there's political pressure to have more owners in the news business, not fewer.

Meanwhile, the IRS told the Tribune that it owed a billion (yes, Billion) dollars in taxes as a result of the money-shuffling it did when it bought the LA Times a few years ago. The Tribune's been stalling the IRS while it decides what to do with itself. And circulation is declining at all of its papers at the same time advertising money has been drying up. Stockholders began storming the gates.

What else could go wrong? Oh, I almost forgot -- the Cubs finished dead last and saw their TV ratings slide, while their ballpark was falling apart.

Not a good time to be a cigar-chomping media mogul in Tribune Tower. :tongue:

Ol' No. 2
11-02-2006, 03:59 PM
It's a fine mess they've gotten themselves into. The Tribune had grand plans for itself and jumped aboard the same buy-your-way-to-happiness wagon that Clear Channel company did. Now both companies are looking for private buyers and are gradually selling off pieces of their companies.

The Tribune figured that if it owned newspapers in New York, Chicago, and LA, along with other large papers in places like Baltimore and Orlando, it could forge ahead and buy TV stations in those cities and have an advertising juggernaut. The problem with that plan was that the FCC has had rules on the books for many years prohibiting one company from owning newspapers and TV stations in the same city. No problem, figured the Tribune, we're cozy with the FCC and they'll change the rules -- except it didn't happen and now there's political pressure to have more owners in the news business, not fewer.

Meanwhile, the IRS told the Tribune that it owed a billion (yes, Billion) dollars in taxes as a result of the money-shuffling it did when it bought the LA Times a few years ago. The Tribune's been stalling the IRS while it decides what to do with itself. And circulation is declining at all of its papers at the same time advertising money has been drying up. Stockholders began storming the gates.

What else could go wrong? Oh, I almost forgot -- the Cubs finished dead last and saw their TV ratings slide, while their ballpark was falling apart.

Not a good time to be a cigar-chomping media mogul in Tribune Tower. :tongue:Kind of warms the cockles of your heart, doesn't it?

Hitmen77
11-02-2006, 05:00 PM
I wonder how this affects their baseball division?

I know asking this risks a Gary Coleman graphic or a "flubsession" accussation, but I'm actually interested as a baseball fan about how this all trickles down to the Cubs. Some in the media have suggested that the Cubs will be able to boost payroll higher than its current $100 million or so. Given that their owner is in turmoil I wonder if the payroll boost is really a reasonable assumption.

SOXSINCE'70
11-02-2006, 05:19 PM
It's a fine mess they've gotten themselves into. The Tribune had grand plans for itself and jumped aboard the same buy-your-way-to-happiness wagon that Clear Channel company did. Now both companies are looking for private buyers and are gradually selling off pieces of their companies.

The Tribune figured that if it owned newspapers in New York, Chicago, and LA, along with other large papers in places like Baltimore and Orlando, it could forge ahead and buy TV stations in those cities and have an advertising juggernaut. The problem with that plan was that the FCC has had rules on the books for many years prohibiting one company from owning newspapers and TV stations in the same city. No problem, figured the Tribune, we're cozy with the FCC and they'll change the rules -- except it didn't happen and now there's political pressure to have more owners in the news business, not fewer.

Meanwhile, the IRS told the Tribune that it owed a billion (yes, Billion) dollars in taxes as a result of the money-shuffling it did when it bought the LA Times a few years ago. The Tribune's been stalling the IRS while it decides what to do with itself. And circulation is declining at all of its papers at the same time advertising money has been drying up. Stockholders began storming the gates.

What else could go wrong? Oh, I almost forgot -- the Cubs finished dead last and saw their TV ratings slide, while their ballpark was falling apart.

Not a good time to be a cigar-chomping media mogul in Tribune Tower. :tongue:

Kind of warms the cockles of your heart, doesn't it?

It makes me damn proud to be a Sox fan!!:cool:

ewokpelts
11-02-2006, 05:22 PM
Kind of warms the cockles of your heart, doesn't it?
maybe even the colon...we dont know

Lip Man 1
11-02-2006, 08:06 PM
Hitmen:

Supposedly that's one of the reasons Piniella took the job. He was given assurances the payroll would be upped to about 115 million dollars.

Remember Piniella is like Baker in the sense that they have no use for 'rookies.' Veteran talent costs money...a lot of money.

Lip

tebman
11-03-2006, 09:43 AM
Another update (http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?post_date=2006-11-02&id=22727), followed by another (http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?id=22715).

And the hits just keep on comin'...

Tribune Co. in recent weeks has agreed to sell $84 million worth of assets as the media company contemplates putting itself up for sale, according to a regulatory filing on Thursday.

Tribune sold its corporate jet as well as real estate last month and agreed to sell a stake in human resources software company BrassRing LLC, it reported in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The Chicago-based company also is thinking about selling other assets such as the Los Angeles Times newspaper and the Chicago Cubs baseball team, after initial bids for the company came in lower than expected, media reports on Thursday said.

Ol' No. 2
11-03-2006, 11:21 AM
Another update (http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?post_date=2006-11-02&id=22727), followed by another (http://chicagobusiness.com/cgi-bin/news.pl?id=22715).

And the hits just keep on comin'...With the IRS breathing down their necks, the Tribune Co. needs cash - lots of it and fast. While the Cubs make money, they're still small potatoes compared to the rest of the company, but they can generate a lot of $$$ in a sale.

ewokpelts
11-03-2006, 11:33 AM
wall street journal is reporting "too little too late....." on the tribster's actions, and that they may NOT get what they're asking for, especially on the cubs, if thier payroll is too high.
me thinks lou got duped a la joe giradi/marlins....watch the cubune SLASH payroll in preparation of a sale

BeeBeeRichard
11-03-2006, 11:46 AM
wall street journal is reporting "too little too late....." on the tribster's actions, and that they may NOT get what they're asking for, especially on the cubs, if thier payroll is too high.
me thinks lou got duped a la joe giradi/marlins....watch the cubune SLASH payroll in preparation of a sale

Yeah, whatever Sweet Lou was promised won't matter when whoever made the promise isn't in charge anymore.

Edward
11-08-2006, 03:13 PM
More news about this.

Billionaire businessman Eli Broad and supermarket magnate Ron Burkle have teamed up to submit a bid for the Tribune Co., The Associated Press has learned.

link (http://sports.yahoo.com/top/news;_ylt=AtIXyDq4Ad6OOwARS3_xye85nYcB?slug=ap-tribune-offer&prov=ap&type=lgns)

Fenway
11-08-2006, 03:15 PM
Rumors are flying that Tribune Broadcasting is on the block as well ( including WGN ) In the end the Chandler family of Los Angeles will get what they want.

eastchicagosoxfan
11-08-2006, 08:05 PM
It's a fine mess they've gotten themselves into. The Tribune had grand plans for itself and jumped aboard the same buy-your-way-to-happiness wagon that Clear Channel company did. Now both companies are looking for private buyers and are gradually selling off pieces of their companies.

The Tribune figured that if it owned newspapers in New York, Chicago, and LA, along with other large papers in places like Baltimore and Orlando, it could forge ahead and buy TV stations in those cities and have an advertising juggernaut. The problem with that plan was that the FCC has had rules on the books for many years prohibiting one company from owning newspapers and TV stations in the same city. No problem, figured the Tribune, we're cozy with the FCC and they'll change the rules -- except it didn't happen and now there's political pressure to have more owners in the news business, not fewer.

Meanwhile, the IRS told the Tribune that it owed a billion (yes, Billion) dollars in taxes as a result of the money-shuffling it did when it bought the LA Times a few years ago. The Tribune's been stalling the IRS while it decides what to do with itself. And circulation is declining at all of its papers at the same time advertising money has been drying up. Stockholders began storming the gates.

What else could go wrong? Oh, I almost forgot -- the Cubs finished dead last and saw their TV ratings slide, while their ballpark was falling apart.

Not a good time to be a cigar-chomping media mogul in Tribune Tower. :tongue:
I love it when you analyze.:D: