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Soxworldchamps
10-27-2006, 04:59 PM
Does anyone have a link to a video of Sandy Koufax pitching? I'm reading a biography on him and I really want to see him throw.

Any help's appreciated :smile:

jamokes
10-27-2006, 05:01 PM
I don't have one but the most popular ones would be the World Series games he pitched in, 1963 and 1965 come to mind.

DiGiSyKo
10-27-2006, 05:08 PM
Streaming Windows Media video in the Bio section...
http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/hofers_and_honorees/hofer_bios/koufax_sandy.htm

eriqjaffe
10-27-2006, 05:26 PM
I think Koufax would be too much of an injury risk for the Sox. Stick with B-Mac.

Steelrod
10-27-2006, 05:48 PM
I think Koufax would be too much of an injury risk for the Sox. Stick with B-Mac.
He's had time to rest his arm.

Trav
10-27-2006, 06:27 PM
I heard someone say one time, that watching those videos, he couldn't see the big deal with Kofax. He didn't seem to be throwing all that hard and then he saw Mantle swing. "It looked like he was swinging underwater". I thought that was funny. I would have loved to see him pitch.

Jacob Nelson Fox
10-28-2006, 12:03 AM
Pinpoint control with over powering stuff. Imagine a cross between Greg Maddux in his prime and Randy Johnson in his prime. :o:

PKalltheway
10-28-2006, 12:25 AM
Did Bob Gibson, Juan Marichal, and Sandy Koufax ever pitch in the same All-Star Game? If they did, I truly feel sorry for whoever was playing for the AL back then.

Wsoxmike59
10-28-2006, 08:14 AM
http://mlb.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/mlb/mediacenter/classics.jsp

You can watch Sandy pitch Game 7 of the 1965 World Series against the Twins right here. (for a nominal fee of course)

I never got to see Sandy pitch live and in person, but everything I've ever read about him, when he was on the bump, was he was the toughest pitcher to dig in and hit off of in the 50's and 60's.

Sandy along with Don Drysdale made facing the Dodgers a task most hitters use to loathe. They were some tough hombres on the mound and just huge competitors who wouldn't think twice about brushing a hitter back to gain an advantage.

As with most fireballers it took Koufax awhile to develop his pinpoint control. He was wild early in his career (Brooklyn), but then he just developed in to one of, if not the best pitchers in the game.

Lip Man 1
10-28-2006, 11:33 AM
Koufax had a curve ball that was unhittable. Especially with the higher mound. Jeff Torborg who caught a few of his no hitters, said that the torque Sandy had on his breaking ball you could hear the wind hitting the seams and that if the distance between the mound and home plate was longer the ball would have returned to the mound like a boomerang.

If you want to watch some amazing video (and audio) of Sandy, get or rent When It Was A Game III: The 60's.

Makes the Sox beating him 1-0 in Game #5 of the 1959 World Series even more amazing.

Lip

viagracat
10-28-2006, 12:11 PM
Koufax had a curve ball that was unhittable. Especially with the higher mound. Jeff Torborg who caught a few of his no hitters, said that the torque Sandy had on his breaking ball you could hear the wind hitting the seams and that if the distance between the mound and home plate was longer the ball would have returned to the mound like a boomerang.

If you want to watch some amazing video (and audio) of Sandy, get or rent When It Was A Game III: The 60's.

Makes the Sox beating him 1-0 in Game #5 of the 1959 World Series even more amazing.

Lip

I remember his curve ball, it was really something. Those kinds of pitches can also be very hard on the arm and shoulder, and back in the day the medical remedies for arm and shoulder problems wasn't nearly as advanced. It's too bad he was done at the age of 31.

Soxworldchamps
10-28-2006, 01:09 PM
Koufax had a curve ball that was unhittable. Especially with the higher mound. Jeff Torborg who caught a few of his no hitters, said that the torque Sandy had on his breaking ball you could hear the wind hitting the seams and that if the distance between the mound and home plate was longer the ball would have returned to the mound like a boomerang.

If you want to watch some amazing video (and audio) of Sandy, get or rent When It Was A Game III: The 60's.

Makes the Sox beating him 1-0 in Game #5 of the 1959 World Series even more amazing.

Lip


Thanks, I'll check it out.

michned
10-28-2006, 09:17 PM
If you want to watch some amazing video (and audio) of Sandy, get or rent When It Was A Game III: The 60's.


Lip, don't mean to hijack this but how does When It Was A Game 3 compare to 1 and 2? I think every kid just discovering baseball should be required to watch the first one.

Sandy pitched his perfect game on the night of my first birthday, and I always get a kick of the photos my parents took, just knowing that after my little party around the kitchen table my Dad went into the front room later that evening and saw a perfect game (assuming WGN televised it).

ewokpelts
10-29-2006, 11:24 AM
http://www.chefrocker.com/walter/walter24.jpg

3000 YEARS OF HISTORY, FROM MOSES TO SANDY KOUFAX, YOU'RE GODDAM RIGHT I'M LIVING IN THE PAST!
SHOBER SHABBIS!

Lip Man 1
10-29-2006, 12:14 PM
Because the technology changed from WIWAG I (the time period talked about) to WIWAG III the home movie footage looks better.

And from a personal note I grew up in the 60's so that edition has more meaning for me. (I have all three by the way...)

Lip

soxfan1965
10-29-2006, 01:02 PM
Koufax had a curve ball that was unhittable. Especially with the higher mound. Jeff Torborg who caught a few of his no hitters, said that the torque Sandy had on his breaking ball you could hear the wind hitting the seams and that if the distance between the mound and home plate was longer the ball would have returned to the mound like a boomerang.

If you want to watch some amazing video (and audio) of Sandy, get or rent When It Was A Game III: The 60's.

Makes the Sox beating him 1-0 in Game #5 of the 1959 World Series even more amazing.

Lip

I saw that amazing curve ball too. Not only unhittable but almost perfect and beautiful to watch. I remember seeing it on WGN with LA at Wrigley around 1965 and Brickhouse saying "ssssttttttriiiikkkkkeeee" in a way that was in pure admiration and awe like we saw on TV.

TheKittle
10-30-2006, 02:24 AM
One thing to remember about Koufax is he had those great stats while pitching over 280 or more innings in a season. None of these crap 225 innings **** you see now.

slavko
10-30-2006, 12:00 PM
http://mlb.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/mlb/mediacenter/classics.jsp

You can watch Sandy pitch Game 7 of the 1965 World Series against the Twins right here. (for a nominal fee of course)

I never got to see Sandy pitch live and in person, but everything I've ever read about him, when he was on the bump, was he was the toughest pitcher to dig in and hit off of in the 50's and 60's.

Sandy along with Don Drysdale made facing the Dodgers a task most hitters use to loathe. They were some tough hombres on the mound and just huge competitors who wouldn't think twice about brushing a hitter back to gain an advantage.

As with most fireballers it took Koufax awhile to develop his pinpoint control. He was wild early in his career (Brooklyn), but then he just developed in to one of, if not the best pitchers in the game.

Koufax was reluctant to brush back anyone. Thus the famous incident where opposing pitcher Juan Marichal was due for a retaliatory brushback and Sandy wouldn't do it, so Sandy's catcher, John Roseboro, did it on the return throw to the mound. Marichal responded by hitting Roseboro over the head with his bat. Ugly.

Drysdale on the other hand.......

fquaye149
10-30-2006, 01:53 PM
One thing to remember about Koufax is he had those great stats while pitching over 280 or more innings in a season. None of these crap 225 innings **** you see now.

Yes. those damn modern pitchers with their inflated strikeout numbers.:?:

Koufax was incredible, and his numbers speak for themselves. No need to tear down current pitchers (especially those like Pedro who were as dominant as Koufax).

There was incredible talent in all eras, and taking digs at contemporary baseball (unless it's a dig at steroids) is unnecessary. The strike zone was much bigger and the mounds much higher in Koufax's time. And yet that doesn't mean he wasn't a wonderful talent. He was and so is every great pitcher in every era