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View Full Version : Mark Fidrych 30 years later


Fenway
10-22-2006, 05:26 PM
I'll never forget the Monday Night Baseball game where he left Howard Cosell speechless:smile:


http://redsox.bostonherald.com/otherMLB/view.bg?articleid=163543
http://www.cnnsi.com/features/galleries/2001/then_and_now/fidrych/fidrych01_md-01.jpg



Fidrych still makes public appearances, but for the most part lives a simple life on his farm. For the past 17 years hes driven a truck for a Worcester construction company. When he needs a day off because the Jimmy Fund or a baseball card show wants him to make an appearance, he runs it by his boss, who calls him the celebrity truck driver.


Fidrych also helps his mother-in-law run the iconic Chets Diner in Northboro.


Im the dishwasher, he said.

1951Campbell
10-22-2006, 07:36 PM
I'll never forget the Monday Night Baseball game where he left Howard Cosell speechless:smile:


http://redsox.bostonherald.com/otherMLB/view.bg?articleid=163543
http://www.cnnsi.com/features/galleries/2001/then_and_now/fidrych/fidrych01_md-01.jpg



Fidrych still makes public appearances, but for the most part lives a simple life on his farm. For the past 17 years hes driven a truck for a Worcester construction company. When he needs a day off because the Jimmy Fund or a baseball card show wants him to make an appearance, he runs it by his boss, who calls him the celebrity truck driver.


Fidrych also helps his mother-in-law run the iconic Chets Diner in Northboro.


Im the dishwasher, he said.

I saw him on ESPN Classic once. He really was as loony on the mound as the stories make him sound.

And it's weird, he didn't really strike a lot of guys out, if I recall.

Oblong
10-22-2006, 10:24 PM
The fact that he didn't strike out a lot of guys suggests that he may not have been good for very long. So in a way it's good that he got hurt early on, at least in terms of his legacy. It can always be traced to the injury and not just being a bad pitcher. We remember him on top.

He was my first memory of baseball. I see him at autograph shows and he's so genuine and sincere.

DSpivack
10-22-2006, 10:51 PM
The fact that he didn't strike out a lot of guys suggests that he may not have been good for very long. So in a way it's good that he got hurt early on, at least in terms of his legacy. It can always be traced to the injury and not just being a bad pitcher. We remember him on top.

This argument would apply to Buehrle, no?

whitesoxfan1986
10-25-2006, 04:27 PM
Just because a guy doesn't rack up Ks doesn't mean he can't be a good pitcher. If you use that analogy then Mark Prior is more valuable than Mark Buehrle, which we all know is not the case despite Buehrle's extremely ****ty year in '06. I believe that Buehrle is probably going to learn a new pitch this offseason, and come back with a year comparable to 2002 or 2005. I think that every team should have a starter who can K a lot of batters, but those guys tend to get injured often, so you need pitchers who can get you wins, eat up innings, and don't have to rack up Ks to get you those things.

Oblong
10-25-2006, 06:45 PM
I didn't say they can't be a good pitcher. I'm just going by what the data over the years has strongly suggested. Young pitchers who don't strike out a lot of guys tend to flame out. A lot doesn't mean Pedro or Randy levels. It means within striking distance of the league average. It's not absolute because it's hard to be absolute with pitchers because every pitch could be their last. There's a lot of other issues at play.

Iwritecode
10-26-2006, 10:14 AM
OK, I read the article and still have no clue who this guy is or what made him so famous...

:dunno:

fquaye149
10-26-2006, 10:33 AM
This argument would apply to Buehrle, no?
Well, you tell me.

Does Mark strike a lot of guys out? If not, then the argument probably DOES apply to Buehrle.

The question is, is the argument valid. 2006 notwithstanding...probably not.

tebman
10-26-2006, 11:03 AM
OK, I read the article and still have no clue who this guy is or what made him so famous...

:dunno:

He was a flash-in-the-pan pitcher with the Tigers who was notable because he was goofy. He was animated on the mound -- not talking smack, just talking to himself. He'd get down on his knees and smooth the mound with his hands before beginning an inning. His twitches and tics earned him the nickname "The Bird."

His career was shortened by an injury. An old story, but made interesting because he was such a character.

Paulwny
10-26-2006, 11:37 AM
OK, I read the article and still have no clue who this guy is or what made him so famous...

:dunno:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Fidrych

PaulDrake
10-26-2006, 12:57 PM
Since when does a pitcher need to strike out a lot of batters to be considered good? Chalk up another fallacy of the stathead generation.

spiffie
10-26-2006, 03:57 PM
Since when does a pitcher need to strike out a lot of batters to be considered good? Chalk up another fallacy of the stathead generation.
The league average this year was about 6.4 K/9. Tell you what, you go find me any pitcher we would reasonably consider a "great" pitcher in the last 30 years who was consistently below 6.0 K/9 year in and year out. Here, I'll give you one pitcher:
Tom Glavine career 5.4 K/9
(in his best years as defined by ERA+ his numbers were 6.2, 7.0, 6.92)

But hey, maybe I'm missing a whole lot of pitchers who had amazing careers while striking out 3 guys every nine innings. If so, please let me know.