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View Full Version : This Date In Sox History 10-18 (updated)


Lip Man 1
10-19-2006, 08:18 PM
A tad late but just realized.

October 18, 1969 - A little known studio musical group comes out with an oddly named song. On this date it broke into the Billboard chart and would eventually move all the way to #1. The group was called Steam. The song, "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye..." Thanks to the efforts of Sox organist Nancy Faust it would become the song fans used to ‘serenade’ pitchers being removed from games. It’s used practically at every stadium today but it started on the South Side!

From Wikipedia:

"The song was transformed into a stadium anthem during the 1977 Major League Baseball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball) season. Chicago White Sox (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_White_Sox) organist Nancy Faust (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Faust) had played the song many times before when opposing pitchers were relieved or when the Sox had clearly won the game, but without much reaction from the Comiskey Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comiskey_Park) fans. During a critical series with the Kansas City Royals (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansas_City_Royals), however, the crowd began singing along with the tune, and a tradition was born.[2] (http://www.suntimes.com/photos/galleries/realchicago_sports/1970s/index.html) Since then, the song has become a staple of many sporting events. The song's familiar chorus of "Na na na na / na na na na / hey hey / goodbye" is often chanted by fans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fan_%28aficionado%29) near the end of a contest to signify that victory is all but assured. This is sometimes accompanied by the gesture of holding up keys (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_%28lock%29).

The song remains a favorite of White Sox (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Sox) fans. Today it is used when opposing pitchers are pulled, when the White Sox hit a home run, and when the Sox win a game. It was also played by Nancy Faust during the White Sox World Series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Series) victory parade on October 28, 2005. Fans at Soldier Field (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldier_Field) and other Chicago sports venues are also known to sing it when victory is certain. However, because it is so closely associated with the White Sox (see Cubs-White Sox rivalry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cubs-White_Sox_rivalry)), it is never played at Wrigley Field (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrigley_Field), despite its mention in the song "A Dying Cub Fan's Last Request" by folksinger and Cub fan Steve Goodman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Goodman)."

Lip