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View Full Version : RIP Johnny Callison


viagracat
10-13-2006, 12:03 PM
He became a star with the Phillies but started his career with the White Sox and was on the 1959 team that went to the World Series.

Link (http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/15750998.htm)

RIP. :(:

Fenway
10-13-2006, 12:05 PM
Hero of the 1964 All-Star game with a home run off Dick Radatz at Shea.

TommyJohn
10-13-2006, 12:31 PM
Part of the legendary 1964 Phillies that blew the 6.5 game lead. Went to
the Phils for the immortal Gene Freese, third baseman who struck fear
into the hearts of fans sitting on the first base side.

Also one of the few players to hit a grand slam for the White Sox and Cubs.

Johnny, we hardly knew ye. :(:

wilburaga
10-13-2006, 12:37 PM
I often wonder how differently the 60's would have played out for the Sox if Veeck hadn't dumped Callison, Romano, Cash, Mincher and Battey before the 1960 season. Sigh.


W

Lip Man 1
10-13-2006, 12:57 PM
Very sad news. All my life I've been hoping to find a copy of the documentary on him produced by the Sox called, 'the life of a Sox rookie...'

Lip

jackbrohamer
10-13-2006, 01:03 PM
I often wonder how differently the 60's would have played out for the Sox if Veeck hadn't dumped Callison, Romano, Cash, Mincher and Battey before the 1960 season. Sigh. W

My father hated Bill Veeck for more than 40 years becasue of those trades.

LuvSox
10-13-2006, 01:09 PM
http://www.vintagecardtraders.org/virtual/59topps/59topps-119.jpg

JungleJimR
10-13-2006, 01:54 PM
I finally had to enroll on this wonderful site as I have had a lot of good times reading about our Sox from real fans.

Trading away Johnny along with all of these other to be all stars cost our team at least 2 pennants in the following 10 years.

We always had superior pitching during the early 60's with Peters, Pizarro, Hebert, etc. But we couldn't score runs and these guys were true all stars throughout this period. Just think of having Cash, Callison, Battey, and John Honey Romano in addition to our pitching staff.

wilburaga
10-13-2006, 02:35 PM
Not to belabor this, but the quintet Veeck traded away before the '60 season combined for 1036 career home runs. (Cash 377, Callison 226, Mincher 200, Romano 129 and Battey 104)

In the years 1960 through 1969 the Sox team combined for 1046 total home runs.

W

TDog
10-13-2006, 04:21 PM
Johnny Callison actually got the hit that won the game for the Phillies against the Cubs that knocked the Cubs out of first place in 1969, 10 years after going to the World Series with the White Sox.

Lip Man 1
10-13-2006, 04:34 PM
One other thing about the Veeck deals in 1960 not commonly known...some of the guys he eventually traded for were not his first choices. He apparently had talks with the Giants about getting Orlando Cepeda and the Cardinals for Bill White.

After being rebuffed he 'settled' for what he got.

Also Johnny was not on the roster for the Sox in the 1959 World Series. I recall reading he was so upset and disappointed that he went back to Oklahoma and never saw or listened to a single inning.

Lip

Procol Harum
10-13-2006, 05:44 PM
Echoing the sentiments of everyone else--the 1960s sure might've been different if we would've had Johnny Callison roaming right field. While I doubt his power numbers would've been as good at Comiskey as they were in Philly, his fielding and overall bat very likely could have pushed us over the top in the '64 to '67 period whether or not we had retained a Battey or Cash.

RIP, Johnny C.

wassagstdu
10-13-2006, 08:19 PM
What a shame that Callison's outstanding career was not played with the Sox. I remember the first satellite TV broadcast that went to Europe included part of a game from Wrigley Field, and if I remember correctly, what the world saw was Johnny Callison making a catch in right field. Every time I saw him play I thought how sad those trades in 1960 were for the Sox.

Outstanding player, outstanding career. RIP Johnny Callison.

TornLabrum
10-13-2006, 09:25 PM
RIP Johnny Callison.

I'll never forget his broken bat homer against the Cubs at Wrigley. He was a strong one.