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View Full Version : Mackowiak '06 = Luis Salazar 1985


Brian26
10-04-2006, 09:38 PM
I'm watching these replays of the double tag-out at home in the Mets game, and they've showed the similar play by Fisk from 1985. The Sox centerfielder who missed the flyball was Luis Salazar. Wasn't he originally a third baseman? I don't remember him playing CF at all, but he looked just as out of place as Mackowiak in trying to run down the flyball by Henderson at Yankee Stadium.

batmanZoSo
10-04-2006, 10:08 PM
I'm watching these replays of the double tag-out at home in the Mets game, and they've showed the similar play by Fisk from 1985. The Sox centerfielder who missed the flyball was Luis Salazar. Wasn't he originally a third baseman? I don't remember him playing CF at all, but he looked just as out of place as Mackowiak in trying to run down the flyball by Henderson at Yankee Stadium.

I remember him playing utility third for the '89 Cubs. That was his primary position.

caulfield12
10-05-2006, 04:45 AM
I remember him playing utility third for the '89 Cubs. That was his primary position.

I think a comparision to Jose Valentin is more appropriate.

He was primary an infielder on the lefthand side of the diamond.

Minnie Me
10-05-2006, 08:11 AM
Why is it that MLB managers thinks they can trot middle infielders out to CF without it coming back to bite them?

My solemn vow:

Never to watch any game that Mack starts in CF. Period.

batmanZoSo
10-05-2006, 08:49 AM
I think a comparision to Jose Valentin is more appropriate.

He was primary an infielder on the lefthand side of the diamond.

He played the vast majority of his games at third--893, 293, 121 (3B, OF, SS) respectively. Valentin was a very good SS minus the throwing errors, but a true SS nonetheless. This guy was a third baseman/OF who could play SS if needed from the looks of it.

caulfield12
10-05-2006, 09:02 AM
He played the vast majority of his games at third--893, 293, 121 (3B, OF, SS) respectively. Valentin was a very good SS minus the throwing errors, but a true SS nonetheless. This guy was a third baseman/OF who could play SS if needed from the looks of it.


The reason I made the comparison was because were inserted into the outfield, which was a disaster for Jose, as he strained a hamstring early and had trouble all season long.

Valentin, definitely a better and more versatile athlete, great arm, great baseunner. Just a baseball player, like I think of Sweeney (unfortunately, Anderson reminds me of a RH version of Valentin, MINUS the power).

Would have been interesting had we moved Valentin over to 2B to take Durham's spot and not had to endure the Willie Harris years.

stl_sox_fan
10-05-2006, 10:37 AM
Luis Salazar...things I've learned from Harry Carry, his name spelled backwards is Razalas. Actually heard that during a Cubs broadcast years back.

Baby Fisk
10-05-2006, 10:54 AM
:hawk

"The best converted infielder I ever saw was Norm Siebern. When I broke in with Kansas, he played first base and outfield. He also had the finest singing voice around. We called him Little Caruso. I played with him later in Boston. GET FOUL! It will, thank you. Yaz fancied himself a singer too. He kept asking us to form a barbershop quartet, but we could never agree on what color blazers we would wear. I think it was mostly because no one wanted to wear those boater hats."

:DJ
*checking out veins on his wrist that he might like to sever if this goes on much longer*

Chez
10-05-2006, 11:14 AM
I recall Salazar coming over from the Padres as a guy who could play BOTH positions (3B and CF) equally well. They said the same thing about Steve Lyons when we got him from Boston for Seaver.

Lip Man 1
10-05-2006, 12:09 PM
According to Retrosheet, Salazar played all over the outfield at times in the four years he was with the Padres before coming over to the Sox as part of the Guillen / Hoyt deal. As I recall he was competent in the outfield.

Lip

skottyj242
10-05-2006, 12:43 PM
The last home game this year I got a Luis Salazar baseball card from the beer guy who gives you baseball cards for some reason if you give him a tip. It's the 1987 topps.

MrRoboto83
10-05-2006, 12:50 PM
Pencil me in for a retro 85 Salazar jersey now.:cool:

TDog
10-06-2006, 02:02 AM
According to Retrosheet, Salazar played all over the outfield at times in the four years he was with the Padres before coming over to the Sox as part of the Guillen / Hoyt deal. As I recall he was competent in the outfield.

Lip


Luis Salazar was a late-inning center-field defensive replacement for starter Bobby Brown in Game 2 of the 1984 World Series, the game the Padres won 5-3. He also came in to play center in Game 5 after pinch running for Carmelo Martinez. Brown moved to left when Salazar came into the game. Salazar was regarded as a good center fielder.

During Salazar's third stint with the Padres, he was a teammate of Darrin Jackson. He also was a teammate of future Sox coaches Harold Baines and Joey Cora, and, as you sort of noted, Lip, his third base/center field prowess was observed by teammate Ozzie Guillen.

soxinem1
10-07-2006, 11:20 AM
According to Retrosheet, Salazar played all over the outfield at times in the four years he was with the Padres before coming over to the Sox as part of the Guillen / Hoyt deal. As I recall he was competent in the outfield.

Lip

Salazar was the Opening Day 3B in 1985, and if there was one thing I remember, other than some clutch HR's, was that the little guy had a cannon for an arm, and the ball rifled off his bat when he made hard contact, much like Valentin. Both of them are/were similar type baserunners too, not a ton of speed, but could pick their spots well.

There were some similarities between the two, but Jose is by far a better player than Salazar ever was, even if the OF was not quite for him.

Dan the Man
10-07-2006, 01:01 PM
:hawk

"The best converted infielder I ever saw was Norm Siebern. When I broke in with Kansas, he played first base and outfield. He also had the finest singing voice around. We called him Little Caruso. I played with him later in Boston. GET FOUL! It will, thank you. Yaz fancied himself a singer too. He kept asking us to form a barbershop quartet, but we could never agree on what color blazers we would wear. I think it was mostly because no one wanted to wear those boater hats."

:DJ
*checking out veins on his wrist that he might like to sever if this goes on much longer*

:rolling:

1951Campbell
10-07-2006, 01:39 PM
Why is it that MLB managers thinks they can trot middle infielders out to CF without it coming back to bite them?


It's the triumph of hope (Robin Yount and Craig Biggio) over experience (pretty much every other IFer who's moved to the OF).

TheKittle
10-07-2006, 02:05 PM
I'm watching these replays of the double tag-out at home in the Mets game, and they've showed the similar play by Fisk from 1985. The Sox centerfielder who missed the flyball was Luis Salazar. Wasn't he originally a third baseman? I don't remember him playing CF at all, but he looked just as out of place as Mackowiak in trying to run down the flyball by Henderson at Yankee Stadium.

You can't really judge a player based upon ONE play. Salazar wasn't going to win a gold glove in CF or anything. But he was a good defender in CF. Did he look bad on that play? No question. But it happens.

samram
10-07-2006, 02:22 PM
It's the triumph of hope (Robin Yount and Craig Biggio) over experience (pretty much every other IFer who's moved to the OF).

Why do I recall Biggio sucking out there? It could be because I have a bad memory. Another guy that has done OK in the OF is Sheffield.