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Lip Man 1
10-03-2006, 01:04 PM
October 4, 1948 - Chuck Comiskey III is named vice president of the White Sox. He refuses to see the team continue to be the laughingstock of the American League and immediately begins to take steps to charge things. Those changes will start to bear fruit during the 1951 season.

October 4, 1981 - Jerry Hairston’s grand slam beats the Twins 13 - 12 setting off Bill Veeck’s original exploding scoreboard for the last time. The game also marks the end of Harry Caray’s association with the Sox after eleven seasons.

http://i8.ebayimg.com/01/i/08/63/2f/5e_1.JPG

Lip

jackbrohamer
10-03-2006, 01:28 PM
October 4, 1981 - Jerry Hairston’s grand slam beats the Twins 13 - 12 setting off Bill Veeck’s original exploding scoreboard for the last time. The game also marks the end of Harry Caray’s association with the Sox after eleven seasons.

Had Caray announced he was leaving at the time, or did he do it after the season ended? My memory's bad but I seem to remember he left the Sox and joined the Losers all at once.

Lip Man 1
10-03-2006, 01:53 PM
When the 1981 season ended he had no idea it would be his last season. During the off season ownership told Harry they were going ahead with SportsVision and offered him a new contract that reportedly (according to the documentary 'Hello again everybody...') paid more then the Cubs offered.

Caray declined it for two reasons:

1. He was concerned about not reaching as many fans through SportsVision (i.e. his popularity would suffer)

2. He disliked the new owners intensly.

Lip

Britt Burns
10-03-2006, 02:39 PM
SportsVision...what a great idea. I always wonder what would have happened had the Sox been WGN's main draw, not the flubbies.

palehozenychicty
10-03-2006, 02:40 PM
SportsVision...what a great idea. I always wonder what would have happened had the Sox been WGN's main draw, not the flubbies.

The opposite of what you see today in Chicago, except the White Sox would've won more rings.

Palehose13
10-03-2006, 03:20 PM
SportsVision...what a great idea. [/COLOR]

Actually, it was an idea way ahead of its time.

MILTMAY5
10-03-2006, 04:41 PM
When the 1981 season ended he had no idea it would be his last season. During the off season ownership told Harry they were going ahead with SportsVision and offered him a new contract that reportedly (according to the documentary 'Hello again everybody...') paid more then the Cubs offered.

Caray declined it for two reasons:

1. He was concerned about not reaching as many fans through SportsVision (i.e. his popularity would suffer)

2. He disliked the new owners intensly.

LipWow! I have always assumed Caray was fired to make room for Hawk and Don Drysdale. Lip, I've always wondered how these two were chosen given the fact that neither had any prior affiliation with the Sox?

Lip Man 1
10-03-2006, 04:55 PM
A few things:

This historical story I did for WSI looks at SportsVision, the history of broadcasting baseball in Chicago and the Caray situation. It may provide context to this discussion:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=2&id=2096

The story was written in 2002 by the way...

Second, I know that Drysdale was well known for his work with ABC on their national games and was either the Expos or the Rangers TV announcer at the time the Sox hired him. It was something of a coup for the Sox to get someone of Don's caliber. Perhaps the fact that Reinsdorf was from Brooklyn and knew Drysdale, who pitched for the Dodgers, had something to do with it.

I honestly don't know how the Sox got 'Hawk' since I think at the time he was working for Boston. Fenway may have more information on that one. Perhaps the Red Sox changed TV outlets and the new station brought in their own people.

Lip

Hitmen77
10-03-2006, 06:14 PM
Actually, it was an idea way ahead of its time.

Except that SportsVision at the time meant $21/month (in 1982 dollars!) for only one channel that showed Sox, Bulls, and Hawks games. That's not the same as the basic cable station that the Sox and most other MLB teams broadcast on today.

The idea of a local team or teams owning their own broadcast outlet was ahead of it's time. The idea that people would actually pay $21/month (what's that in today's dollars? $50?) to follow the Sox was foolish. Most Chicagoans in the early 80s just tuned in to the Cubs on free TV instead.

bluestar
10-03-2006, 07:06 PM
I honestly don't know how the Sox got 'Hawk' since I think at the time he was working for Boston. Fenway may have more information on that one. Perhaps the Red Sox changed TV outlets and the new station brought in their own people.

Hawk pissed off the Red Sox GM when he publicly called him an "idiot" for allowing Carlton Fisk to get away. Hawk was then fired from his broadcasting job with the Red Sox. I seem to remember reading or hearing that Fisk and Hawk were friends, and Fisk recommended Hawk to the White Sox when Hawk was fired by the Red Sox, but that part may not be correct.

Hitmen77
10-03-2006, 09:03 PM
....
I honestly don't know how the Sox got 'Hawk' since I think at the time he was working for Boston. Fenway may have more information on that one. Perhaps the Red Sox changed TV outlets and the new station brought in their own people.

Lip

Fenway actual did post something about the circumstance of Hawk's departure from Boston about a month ago or so.

AZChiSoxFan
10-04-2006, 10:43 AM
October 4, 1948 - Chuck Comiskey III is named vice president of the White Sox. He refuses to see the team continue to be the laughingstock of the American League and immediately begins to take steps to charge things. Those changes will start to bear fruit during the 1951 season.

October 4, 1981 - Jerry Hairston’s grand slam beats the Twins 13 - 12 setting off Bill Veeck’s original exploding scoreboard for the last time. The game also marks the end of Harry Caray’s association with the Sox after eleven seasons.

http://i8.ebayimg.com/01/i/08/63/2f/5e_1.JPG

Lip


Don't forget: October 4, 2005 The Sox bomb Boston, 14-2 to take game 1 of the ALDS.

downstairs
10-04-2006, 11:23 AM
Except that SportsVision at the time meant $21/month (in 1982 dollars!) for only one channel that showed Sox, Bulls, and Hawks games. That's not the same as the basic cable station that the Sox and most other MLB teams broadcast on today.

The idea of a local team or teams owning their own broadcast outlet was ahead of it's time. The idea that people would actually pay $21/month (what's that in today's dollars? $50?) to follow the Sox was foolish. Most Chicagoans in the early 80s just tuned in to the Cubs on free TV instead.


I agree with you. I think what SportsVision had wrong was the concept that people would pay a lot of money for ONLY regular ol' games that were not special events.

In my opinion, the WWF really pioneered pay-per-view sports (ok, wrestling is not a sport, but close enough.)

The WWF let you get the "regular season" for free or as part of your cable package. Then the "special event" - WrestleMania- cost $19.95.

Had Einhorn tried to do something like this, it could have worked. I don't know how you'd swing it... maybe offer premium regular season series for a price... division rivals, the Yankees, whatever was popular at the time.

He tried to make the whole Sox season "premium", and have people pay for it.

whitesoxwilkes
10-04-2006, 11:36 AM
Fenway actual did post something about the circumstance of Hawk's departure from Boston about a month ago or so.

Here you go. (http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=77377&highlight=%22tony)