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View Full Version : Two 40 HR guys...how common?


cheeses_h_rice
09-06-2006, 10:39 PM
With JD at 40 and JT at 39, it's almost a certainty that our 2006 Sox will have 2 guys with 40 or more dingers.

I don't believe this is at all common; in fact, I wonder if it's ever happened before, at least in modern history. Anyone know?

batmanZoSo
09-06-2006, 10:43 PM
With JD at 40 and JT at 39, it's almost a certainty that our 2006 Sox will have 2 guys with 40 or more dingers.

I don't believe this is at all common; in fact, I wonder if it's ever happened before, at least in modern history. Anyone know?

The Red Sox did it the past two years did they not?

TDog
09-06-2006, 10:52 PM
With JD at 40 and JT at 39, it's almost a certainty that our 2006 Sox will have 2 guys with 40 or more dingers.

I don't believe this is at all common; in fact, I wonder if it's ever happened before, at least in modern history. Anyone know?

It isn't all that uncommon in modern history. Prior to 1900, of course, there weren't many home runs hit, so modern history is where you would find such a feat.

Actually, the 1973 Atlanta Braves had three 40 home run guys -- Henry Aaron, Darrell Evans and Davey Johnson.

Edit: Come to think of it, the 1961 Yankees had two 50-plus home run guys in Maris and Mantle.

cheeses_h_rice
09-06-2006, 10:53 PM
Nice memory, cheeses.

Yeah, the Red Sox did it the last 2 seasons. I guess I didn't think both Manny and Ortiz were that locked in.

:redface:

OK, BESIDES the 2004 & 2005 Red Sox...common?

TheLittleBulldog
09-06-2006, 11:00 PM
It isn't all that uncommon in modern history. Prior to 1900, of course, there weren't many home runs hit, so modern history is where you would find such a feat.

Actually, the 1973 Atlanta Braves had three 40 home run guys -- Henry Aaron, Darrell Evans and Davey Johnson.

Edit: Come to think of it, the 1961 Yankees had two 50-plus home run guys in Maris and Mantle.

I believe the Rockies have had three 40 homerun guys. Galarraga, Castilla, and Walker in 1997 and Galarraga, Castilla, and Ellis Burks in 1996.

cheeses_h_rice
09-06-2006, 11:08 PM
I believe the Rockies have had three 40 homerun guys. Galarraga, Castilla, and Walker in 1997 and Galarraga, Castilla, and Ellis Burks in 1996.

Man, amazing what happens when you combine the freewheeling steroids era with that thin Rocky Mountain air, eh?

:cool:

TheLittleBulldog
09-06-2006, 11:11 PM
Man, amazing what happens when you combine the freewheeling steroids era with that thin Rocky Mountain air, eh?

:cool:

Its like a "perfect storm" for inflated offensive stats. What a sham.

lumpyspun
09-06-2006, 11:16 PM
If Pauly gets "hotter than fish grease" in the last few weeks we could possibly join the 40-40-40 teams...

Nellie_Fox
09-06-2006, 11:50 PM
Man, amazing what happens when you combine the freewheeling steroids era with that thin Rocky Mountain air, eh?

:cool:It seems that they're proving that the "thin air" part of the equation is a myth, but rather the extremely low humidity had been drying out the balls, making them slightly smaller and lighter. This year they've been storing them in a humidor (not Eddie Stanky humid, with slime mold growing on the balls, just normal humid,) and apparently homeruns are way down.

IlliniSox4Life
09-07-2006, 12:31 AM
If Pauly gets "hotter than fish grease" in the last few weeks we could possibly join the 40-40-40 teams...

Same goes for Crede. He's much less likely to get "hotter than fish grease", considering he hasn't hit more than 8 HR in a month this year, but I can have my pipe dreams. A 40-40-40-40 team would be suh-weet. Also, if they both get that hot, I'd have to say we pretty much are gauranteed a spot in the playoffs.

batmanZoSo
09-07-2006, 12:36 AM
It seems that they're proving that the "thin air" part of the equation is a myth, but rather the extremely low humidity had been drying out the balls, making them slightly smaller and lighter. This year they've been storing them in a humidor (not Eddie Stanky humid, with slime mold growing on the balls, just normal humid,) and apparently homeruns are way down.
Is Denver less humid than Phoenix? I know the BOB is a pretty good hitter's park, but it's certainly no Coors historically. The playing field there is cavernous and it's still always been an absolute haven for hitters.

And what about the widely-held belief that breaking balls don't break as much in thinner air?

BadBobbyJenks
09-07-2006, 12:57 AM
What about 35 homer 100 rbi team mates we could get 4

fquaye149
09-07-2006, 01:21 AM
Is Denver less humid than Phoenix? I know the BOB is a pretty good hitter's park, but it's certainly no Coors historically. The playing field there is cavernous and it's still always been an absolute haven for hitters.

And what about the widely-held belief that breaking balls don't break as much in thinner air?

The thing about Coors is that the HR are overstated. It being as big as it is allows a lot of extra base hits to drop in which hurts pitchers' era's making it a huge pitchers' park. Yes HR #'s are high...but this is as much a factor as that.

slavko
09-07-2006, 01:22 AM
It seems that they're proving that the "thin air" part of the equation is a myth, but rather the extremely low humidity had been drying out the balls, making them slightly smaller and lighter. This year they've been storing them in a humidor (not Eddie Stanky humid, with slime mold growing on the balls, just normal humid,) and apparently homeruns are way down.

So when they tell us that humid air is actually lighter than dry air (true), the increased difficulty of hitting the long one on a humid day is really the result of the ball being larger and heavier? It makes sense.

balke
09-07-2006, 05:53 AM
I just wanna get in the playoffs.

dickallen15
09-07-2006, 07:04 AM
In 1961 the Yankees had 2 guys go over 50.

BeviBall!
09-07-2006, 07:41 AM
The Mariners had some punch in the late-90s. Buhner/Griffey and Arod/Griffey both did it twice in back-to-back years.

SouthSide_HitMen
09-07-2006, 04:53 PM
With JD at 40 and JT at 39, it's almost a certainty that our 2006 Sox will have 2 guys with 40 or more dingers.

I don't believe this is at all common; in fact, I wonder if it's ever happened before, at least in modern history. Anyone know?

This happens pretty regularly as of late but was rare until the mid 1990s (about once a decade).

1973 Atlanta Braves - Johnson 43, Evans 41, Aaron 40
1996 Colorado Rockies - Galarraga 47, Burks 40, Castilla 40
1997 Colorado Rockies - Walker 49, Galarraga 41, Castilla 40

1927 New York Yankees - Ruth 60, Gehrig 47
1930 New York Yankees - Ruth 49, Gehrig 41
1931 New York Yankees - Ruth 46, Gehrig 46
1953 Brooklyn Dodgers - Snider 42, Campanella 41
1954 Brooklyn Dodgers - Hodges 42, Snider 40
1955 Cincinnati Reds - Kluszewski 47, Post 40
1961 New York Yankees - Maris 61, Mantle 54
1961 Detroit Tigers - Colavito 45, Cash 41
1961 San Francisco Giants - Cepeda 46, Mays 40
1969 Boston Red Sox - Yastremski 40, Petrocelli 40
1970 Cincinnati Reds - Bench 45, Perez 40

1996 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 49, Buhner 44
1997 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 56, Buhner 40
1998 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 56, Rodriguez 42
1999 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 48, Rodriguez 42
1999 Toronto Blue Jays - Delgado 44, Green 42
2000 Toronto Blue Jays - Delgado 41, Batista 41
2000 Houston Astros - Bagwell 47, Hidalgo 44
2001 Texas Rangers - Rodriguez 52, Palmeiro 47
2002 Texas Rangers - Rodriguez 57, Palmeiro 43
2004 St. Louis Cardinals - Pujols 46, Edmonds 42
2004 Boston Red Sox - Ramirez 43, Ortiz 41
2005 Boston Red Sox - Ortiz 47, Ramirez 45

13 of the existing 30 teams have accomplished this. Two or three teammates did this on 26 occasions with 20 sets of players (6 being repeat performances). Several teams had one player fall short by one home run (39 total with a teammate at 40 +). 1961 was an expansion year for the American League.

SoxEd
09-07-2006, 05:02 PM
Same goes for Crede. He's much less likely to get "hotter than fish grease", considering he hasn't hit more than 8 HR in a month this year, but I can have my pipe dreams. A 40-40-40-40 team would be suh-weet. Also, if they both get that hot, I'd have to say we pretty much are gauranteed a spot in the playoffs.

If PK & JC both go over the 40HR mark this year, I'd suggest that, in addition to being guaranteed a Playoff berth, we'd also be guaranteed a visit from about half the WADA-accredited Drug Testers in North America.
:wink:

Joking aside, I'd personally prefer to see us make the post-season via a return to outstanding Pitching & Defense (and basepath speed), rather than our Sox getting there by having a team made up almost entirely of big sluggers.
Of course, if the only way we can get back in to the October Lottery is by riding the Long Ball, then I say "Giddy Up!".

jortafan
09-07-2006, 05:30 PM
It isn't all that uncommon in modern history. Prior to 1900, of course, there weren't many home runs hit, so modern history is where you would find such a feat.

Actually, the 1973 Atlanta Braves had three 40 home run guys -- Henry Aaron, Darrell Evans and Davey Johnson.

Edit: Come to think of it, the 1961 Yankees had two 50-plus home run guys in Maris and Mantle.

The first 40-40 pair on a team was probably Babe Ruth (60) and Lou Gehrig (47) back in 1927. Seriously, it's not that scarce an event.

Now if Paul Konerko and Joe Crede could get themselves over 40 home runs apiece, having a ballclub with a quartet of 40-plus home run sluggers would be historic.

Of course, I also suspect if the two were to go on such an overswinging binge to try to get home runs, they would also boost their strikeout rates to the point where they would definitely take the White Sox' pennant hopes down the drain.

SouthSide_HitMen
09-18-2006, 09:41 PM
This happens pretty regularly as of late but was rare until the mid 1990s (about once a decade).

1973 Atlanta Braves - Johnson 43, Evans 41, Aaron 40
1996 Colorado Rockies - Galarraga 47, Burks 40, Castilla 40
1997 Colorado Rockies - Walker 49, Galarraga 41, Castilla 40

1927 New York Yankees - Ruth 60, Gehrig 47
1930 New York Yankees - Ruth 49, Gehrig 41
1931 New York Yankees - Ruth 46, Gehrig 46
1953 Brooklyn Dodgers - Snider 42, Campanella 41
1954 Brooklyn Dodgers - Hodges 42, Snider 40
1955 Cincinnati Reds - Kluszewski 47, Post 40
1961 New York Yankees - Maris 61, Mantle 54
1961 Detroit Tigers - Colavito 45, Cash 41
1961 San Francisco Giants - Cepeda 46, Mays 40
1969 Boston Red Sox - Yastremski 40, Petrocelli 40
1970 Cincinnati Reds - Bench 45, Perez 40

1996 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 49, Buhner 44
1997 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 56, Buhner 40
1998 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 56, Rodriguez 42
1999 Seattle Mariners - Griffey 48, Rodriguez 42
1999 Toronto Blue Jays - Delgado 44, Green 42
2000 Toronto Blue Jays - Delgado 41, Batista 41
2000 Houston Astros - Bagwell 47, Hidalgo 44
2001 Texas Rangers - Rodriguez 52, Palmeiro 47
2002 Texas Rangers - Rodriguez 57, Palmeiro 43
2004 St. Louis Cardinals - Pujols 46, Edmonds 42
2004 Boston Red Sox - Ramirez 43, Ortiz 41
2005 Boston Red Sox - Ortiz 47, Ramirez 45
2006 Chicago White Sox - Dye 42, Thome 40

13 of the existing 30 teams have accomplished this. Two or three teammates did this on 26 occasions with 20 sets of players (6 being repeat performances). Several teams had one player fall short by one home run (39 total with a teammate at 40 +). 1961 was an expansion year for the American League.

Delgado needs two more to join Beltran - the only other pair with a chance this season.

The White Sox are now the 14th team to accomplish this feat. Dye and Thome became the 21st pair to do this (the 27th occasion).

If Delgado hits two more they will be the 15th team and 22nd pair in baseball history.

RedHeadPaleHoser
09-18-2006, 09:46 PM
What sickens me about it is the fact that we are probably going to achieve it - on a team that fails to make the postseason. THings like that make me want to throw the stats out the window, because IMHO, what's the point?

SouthSide_HitMen
09-18-2006, 09:56 PM
What sickens me about it is the fact that we are probably going to achieve it - on a team that fails to make the postseason. THings like that make me want to throw the stats out the window, because IMHO, what's the point?

Well at least it will be something positive to remember about the 2006 season down the road.

Dye and Thome did their job (as did Konerko and Crede). So did Garland and Jenks (until the final month when he was hurt). AJ, Iguchi and Mackowiak (playing in CF is Ozzie's fault, not Rob's) also played well this season and MacDougal and Thornton tried to pick up the gutted / weak bullpen.