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Lip Man 1
08-19-2006, 01:58 PM
The 'way back' machine goes 'way back' on a few of these!

August 20, 1915 - The White Sox purchase the contract of ‘Shoeless’ Joe Jackson from the Cleveland Indians for $31,500 dollars.

August 20, 1929 - The Sox honor pitcher Urban ‘Red’ Faber with a day at Comiskey Park. The Hall Of Famer wins 254 games, all with the Sox and has four seasons of twenty or more wins.

August 20, 1948 - The Sox play before the largest regular season crowd in franchise history as they face the Indians on a Friday night in Cleveland. An amazing 78,382 are on hand to see the Tribe edge the Sox 1-0.

August 20, 1989 - After Sox star Harold Baines is traded to Texas, the team retires his uniform number #3. He is only the third active player to have his uniform number retired by a club joining Frank Robinson and Phil Niekro.

Lip

batmanZoSo
08-19-2006, 02:01 PM
The 'way back' machine goes 'way back' on a few of these!

August 20, 1915 - The White Sox purchase the contract of ‘Shoeless’ Joe Jackson from the Cleveland Indians for $31,500 dollars.

August 20, 1929- The Sox honor pitcher Urban ‘Red’ Faber with a day at Comiskey Park. The Hall Of Famer wins 254 games, all with the Sox and has four seasons of twenty or more wins.

August 20, 1948 - The Sox play before the largest regular season crowd in franchise history as they face the Indians on a Friday night in Cleveland. An amazing 78,382 are on hand to see the Tribe edge the Sox 1-0.

August 20, 1989 - After Sox star Harold Baines is traded to Texas, the team retires his uniform number #3. He is only the third active player to have his uniform number retired by a club joining Frank Robinson and Phil Niekro.

Lip


That Cleveland stadium was ridiculously large as well as ugly. What was the attraction for that particular August regular season game? That was Cleveland's WS year, correct?

Brian26
08-19-2006, 03:41 PM
That Cleveland stadium was ridiculously large as well as ugly. What was the attraction for that particular August regular season game? That was Cleveland's WS year, correct?

I read Veeck As In Wreck a couple of years ago. He was the owner at the time, and I'm almost positive there was some strange promotion on that day in order to try to get as many people in there as possible. The Indians were in the heat of the pennant race- yes, it was their World Series year. That also may have been around the time they brought Satchel Paige in from the Negro Leagues.

Paulwny
08-19-2006, 03:57 PM
I read Veeck As In Wreck a couple of years ago. He was the owner at the time, and I'm almost positive there was some strange promotion on that day in order to try to get as many people in there as possible. The Indians were in the heat of the pennant race- yes, it was there World Series year. That also may have been around the time they brough Satchel Paige in from the Negro Leagues.

Yep, that was the year Paige joined mlb, not sure if it had anything to do with this attendance though.

Brian26
08-19-2006, 05:19 PM
Yep, that was the year Paige joined mlb, not sure if it had anything to do with this attendance though.
From Wikipedia (I'm assuming it's ok to copy and paste Wikipedia):

On August 3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_3), 1948 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1948), with the Indians one game behind the Athletics, Boudreau started Paige against the Washington Senators (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnesota_Twins) in Cleveland. The 72,562 people that saw the game set a new attendance record for a major league night game. Nervous, Paige walked two of the first three batters and then gave up a triple to Bud Stewart (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bud_Stewart) to fall behind 2-0. By the time he came out in the seventh, the Indians were up 4-2 and held on to give him his second victory.
His next start was at Comiskey Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comiskey_Park) in Chicago (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago%2C_Illinois). 51,013 people paid to see the game, but many thousands more stormed the turnstiles and crashed into the park, overwhelming the few dozen ticket-takers. Paige went the distance, shutting out the White Sox (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_White_Sox) 5-0, debunking the assumption that nine innings of pitching was now beyond his capabilities.
The Indians were in a heated pennant race on August 20 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_20), 1948 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1948). Coming into the game against the White Sox, Bob Lemon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Lemon), Gene Bearden (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Bearden) and Sam Zoldak (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sam_Zoldak&action=edit) had thrown shutouts to run up a thirty-inning scoreless streak, eleven shy of the big league record. 201,829 people had come to see his last three starts. For this game in Cleveland, 78,382 people came to see Paige, a full 6,000 more people than when he last broke the night attendance record. Paige went the distance, giving up two singles and one double for his second consecutive three hit shutout. At that point in the season, Paige was 5-1 with an astoundingly low 1.33 ERA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earned_run_average). He made one appearance in the 1948 World Series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1948_World_Series). He pitched for two-thirds of an inning in Game Two while the Indians were trailing the Boston Braves (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlanta_Braves), giving up a sacrifice fly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacrifice_fly) to Warren Spahn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_Spahn), got called for a balk and struck out Tommy Holmes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Holmes). The Indians ended up winning the series in six games. Paige ended the year with a 6-1 record with a 2.48 ERA, 45 strikeouts, 2 shutouts and 2 base hits.
The year 1949 wasn’t nearly as good for Paige as 1948. He ended the season with a 4-7 record and was 1-3 in his starts with a 3.04 ERA. After the season, with Veeck selling the team to pay for his divorce, the Indians gave Paige his unconditional release.