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View Full Version : A question for those who live in Lake and Porter Counties in Indina.


stacksedwards
08-09-2006, 01:37 PM
Maybe its just within my circle of friends and acquatinces, but why are there so many Cubs fans in Lake and Porter county? It is a 20 to 45 minute drive to the Cell from most of us while it will take you a good hour to hour and a half to get to the urinal. It really makes no sense to me at all. Sorry I'm ranting but last night I was in a card game with myself and nine other people, eight of which were Cubs fans and I heard some of the dumbest things ever from, Lets go Yankees to isnt there a movie or something on, anything is better than the Sox. To which I replied, o sorry I forgot you guys are from the northwest burdbs and Lincoln Park right?
How can root for the Yankees? Don't people want to see playoff baseball in Chicago again?

stacksedwards
08-09-2006, 01:38 PM
Boy that is embarassing.

Scottiehaswheels
08-09-2006, 01:47 PM
I've chalked it up to most people here being functionally inept, including much of my extended family. Thats about the only thing I can figure. Sounds like you either need new friends, or you should be able to clean up at cards with the group of dumb apes you play with... You don't perhaps play with 8 of those card playing monkeys do you? Can't find a link to the article but you may have heard about it.

Soxfanspcu11
08-09-2006, 02:13 PM
There are quite a few flub fans, but there are more Sox fans, at least in Schererville and surrounding areas.

Scottiehaswheels
08-09-2006, 02:26 PM
There are quite a few flub fans, but there are more Sox fans, at least in Schererville and surrounding areas.This year perhaps.... I was disgusted after the Series how many "new" Sox fans there were/are, including a couple cousins of mine that used to tease me about being a Sox fan... but I guess that comes with success..

Soxfanspcu11
08-09-2006, 02:47 PM
This year perhaps.... I was disgusted after the Series how many "new" Sox fans there were/are, including a couple cousins of mine that used to tease me about being a Sox fan... but I guess that comes with success..

I've always known a ton of Sox fans around here, even prior to 2005. We must run in different circles.....or something.

bigfoot
08-09-2006, 04:49 PM
Maybe its just within my circle of friends and acquatinces, but why are there so many Cubs fans in Lake and Porter county? It is a 20 to 45 minute drive to the Cell from most of us while it will take you a good hour to hour and a half to get to the urinal. It really makes no sense to me at all. Sorry I'm ranting but last night I was in a card game with myself and nine other people, eight of which were Cubs fans and I heard some of the dumbest things ever from, Lets go Yankees to isnt there a movie or something on, anything is better than the Sox. To which I replied, o sorry I forgot you guys are from the northwest burdbs and Lincoln Park right?
How can root for the Yankees? Don't people want to see playoff baseball in Chicago again?

You need to get out of that circle. Run in a straight line for a change!

eastchicagosoxfan
08-09-2006, 07:00 PM
Most of the people I'm friends with are Sox fans. I think the Region mirrors the Chicagoland area, as far as Sox and Cub fans go. I do think that most of the Region's Cub fans are younger, maybe 35 and under. I don't think many people associate with the Southside or the Northside as much as they had before. Now it's about marketing. The Sox market a team trying, and now, winning championships. The Cubs market Loveable Losers. Anyway, this horse has been beaten too many times at this site.

PatK
08-10-2006, 09:09 AM
When I was at the Lake County Fair over the weekend, I saw little Cubs gear, and a LOT of Sox.

ewokpelts
08-10-2006, 11:24 AM
Kenny Lofton and Latroy Hawkins have a lot of fans out in hooiserland.

mph32
08-10-2006, 12:02 PM
we have a lot of sox fans in our area..we always meet for the games on the weekends to watch them or listen to them...we all know that cub fans are so dumb that i dont even pay attention to them..
its like when your wife or girlfriend talk, i just nod my head while not paying attention.

Dan H
08-12-2006, 03:55 PM
There are several stigmas attached to living in Northwest Indiana. Being a Cub fan isn't one of them. We tolerate them here. I thought most Cub fnas were from Iowa.

MrRoboto83
08-12-2006, 04:10 PM
I have always noticed more Sox fans around here in Hammond even before 2005. There are still Cub fans around, and I'm sure if they had a winning season it would be a sea of blue flowing out of the cracks around here just like it was around here in 2003.

TDog
08-12-2006, 04:34 PM
There are several stigmas attached to living in Northwest Indiana. Being a Cub fan isn't one of them. We tolerate them here. I thought most Cub fnas were from Iowa.

I started school at Southridge Elementary in Highland, but mostly grew up in Munster. In 1969, you couldn't find a Sox fan in school. Only when the Sox were doing well did Sox fans dare to come out of the closet. Cubs fans were always out.

Dan H
08-13-2006, 08:47 AM
I started school at Southridge Elementary in Highland, but mostly grew up in Munster. In 1969, you couldn't find a Sox fan in school. Only when the Sox were doing well did Sox fans dare to come out of the closet. Cubs fans were always out.

Were they out or did someone let them out?

Steelrod
08-13-2006, 09:42 AM
I started school at Southridge Elementary in Highland, but mostly grew up in Munster. In 1969, you couldn't find a Sox fan in school. Only when the Sox were doing well did Sox fans dare to come out of the closet. Cubs fans were always out.
Living in the snow belt must do things to their heads! What do you expect from folks would could avoid 60-80 inches of snow by moving 10 miles!

miker
08-14-2006, 10:47 AM
Inbreeding?

johnr1note
08-14-2006, 04:52 PM
Inbreeding?

Well, at least south of Route 30.

Justagirl
08-14-2006, 04:54 PM
Im in Hammond/Hessville. Drive through my neighborhood and you'll see cub flags all over the place and maybe a few sox flags here and there.

dcb56
08-15-2006, 12:58 AM
I'm originally from LaPorte County, and near as I can tell the division between Cubs/Sox fans seems fairly even, though I really don't pay that much attention.

I will say, however, that the Sox missed an incredible opportunity for building a rabid fanbase in northern Indiana/southern Michigan by getting rid of the minor league club they had in South Bend. The South Bend White Sox were one of the main reasons I became a Sox fan as opposed to another sheep in the Cubs herd, it's a shame they didn't keep that affiliate.

johnr1note
08-15-2006, 09:20 AM
In all seriousness, I chalk up allegiance to the Cubs in Northwest Indiana to the same factor that made the Cubs so popular across the country -- television. Cub fan devotion across this great land is born out a couple of decades of superstation WGN being on cable everywhere -- in such remote outlets as Keokuk, Iowa; Billings, Montana, and Boise, Idaho, as well as on TV locally (inlcuding Hammond, Highland, and DeMotte IN) with nothing else on except soap operas in the afternoon. Bored housewives, nursing home residents, kids home from school in the summer, men sitting on barstools, and geeky folks with nothing better to do became devoted to the Cubs -- but strictly as a television product. Indeed, it used to amaze me when I travelled to other major league towns that only a fraction of thier games were available on TV. WGN used to broadcast all 162 Cubs games every year, and the White Sox back when they were on channels 32 adn 44, would broadcast almost as many (though to a smaller audience because of the reception of these lower powered stations). If you grew up during the 60s, 70, 80s and early 90s in Chicago watching TV, or if you were anywhere in the US with WGN 9 on your cable system, odds are you spent a fair amount of your childhood afternoons at least giving the Cubs a passing glance.

The result, of course, was a large, devoted fan base of folks who had little baseball saavy, but liked the TV show. This is why, for example, that the average female Cubs fan is more concerned with whether her favorite "cute" ballplayers are in the lineup, then who is pitching or trends affecting the team. This is why (back in the day before the Cubs sold out all the time) it was tough to get into weekend games because they are sold out to tour groups from places like Keokuk – busloads of people want to see the Cubs because they have seen them on TV. This is why the Cubs gave a big money contract to Ryne Sandburg around the same time they let Greg Maddux go back in the early 90s. Ryno had established "cuteness" and TV aplomb. He was, for all intents and purposes, a TV star. WGN's other big TV hit back in those days was Bozo's Circus. They'd never let Bozo leave for greener pastures; he was the star of the show. In effect, Ryne Sandburg was “Bozo.”

In addition, the Cubs used Harry Carey, former Sox announcer as an Icon.
(It is interesting to note that the two most popular Cub announcers, Harry and Jack Brickhouse, both with statutes outside Wrigley Field, happened to begin their careers in Chicago both primarily as announcers for the White Sox.) There’s an awful lot of hoopla over honoring the memory of Harry Carey by singing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" during the 7th inning stretch, because that was Harry’s tradition started by the Cubs. Except every Sox fan knows it wasn’t started by the Cubs. Its ironic. When Harry was a broadcaster for the Sox, he was viewed as an obnoxious, drunken fool by Cubs fans. That sort of thing was “beneath them.” Once in the Cubs announcer's booth, these same qualities suddenly endeared him to Cubs fans – he became a benign, almost grandfatherly figure. What changed? Indeed, the whole Harry Carey persona, which became the cornerstone of the Cubs' image and marketing, was created first for the White Sox.

But I digress in the second paragraph -- the answer is TV marketing saavy. When my Dad was in high school in the 50s, here on the south side, Cubs fans were non-existent. When i was in junior high in in the early 70s, here in the Southern Suburbs of Chicago (a pitching wedge away from NW Indiana) I was one of a handful of Sox fans in my class. Why? Television!
(combined with the fact the Cubs were regularly contending at that time, of course). But ask any Cub fan who became a Cub fan at an early age -- "I watched the games every summer afternoon on TV."

It reinforces my theory that the two greatest blunders the Sox have ever made were allowing Harry Carey to leave, and trying to put the Sox on pay per view long before the city and suburbs were wired for cable. If the Sox had been as TV saavy as the Cubs had been in those days, NW Indiana and the rest of "Cubdom" might be all wearing Silver and Black today.

Scottiehaswheels
08-15-2006, 09:33 AM
In all seriousness, I chalk up allegiance to the Cubs in Northwest Indiana to the same factor that made the Cubs so popular across the country -- television. Cub fan devotion across this great land is born out a couple of decades of superstation WGN being on cable everywhere -- in such remote outlets as Keokuk, Iowa; Billings, Montana, and Boise, Idaho, as well as on TV locally (inlcuding Hammond, Highland, and DeMotte IN) with nothing else on except soap operas in the afternoon. Bored housewives, nursing home residents, kids home from school in the summer, men sitting on barstools, and geeky folks with nothing better to do became devoted to the Cubs -- but strictly as a television product. Indeed, it used to amaze me when I travelled to other major league towns that only a fraction of thier games were available on TV. WGN used to broadcast all 162 Cubs games every year, and the White Sox back when they were on channels 32 adn 44, would broadcast almost as many (though to a smaller audience because of the reception of these lower powered stations). If you grew up during the 60s, 70, 80s and early 90s in Chicago watching TV, or if you were anywhere in the US with WGN 9 on your cable system, odds are you spent a fair amount of your childhood afternoons at least giving the Cubs a passing glance.

The result, of course, was a large, devoted fan base of folks who had little baseball saavy, but liked the TV show. This is why, for example, that the average female Cubs fan is more concerned with whether her favorite "cute" ballplayers are in the lineup, then who is pitching or trends affecting the team. This is why (back in the day before the Cubs sold out all the time) it was tough to get into weekend games because they are sold out to tour groups from places like Keokuk – busloads of people want to see the Cubs because they have seen them on TV. This is why the Cubs gave a big money contract to Ryne Sandburg around the same time they let Greg Maddux go back in the early 90s. Ryno had established "cuteness" and TV aplomb. He was, for all intents and purposes, a TV star. WGN's other big TV hit back in those days was Bozo's Circus. They'd never let Bozo leave for greener pastures; he was the star of the show. In effect, Ryne Sandburg was “Bozo.”

In addition, the Cubs used Harry Carey, former Sox announcer as an Icon.
(It is interesting to note that the two most popular Cub announcers, Harry and Jack Brickhouse, both with statutes outside Wrigley Field, happened to begin their careers in Chicago both primarily as announcers for the White Sox.) There’s an awful lot of hoopla over honoring the memory of Harry Carey by singing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" during the 7th inning stretch, because that was Harry’s tradition started by the Cubs. Except every Sox fan knows it wasn’t started by the Cubs. Its ironic. When Harry was a broadcaster for the Sox, he was viewed as an obnoxious, drunken fool by Cubs fans. That sort of thing was “beneath them.” Once in the Cubs announcer's booth, these same qualities suddenly endeared him to Cubs fans – he became a benign, almost grandfatherly figure. What changed? Indeed, the whole Harry Carey persona, which became the cornerstone of the Cubs' image and marketing, was created first for the White Sox.

But I digress in the second paragraph -- the answer is TV marketing saavy. When my Dad was in high school in the 50s, here on the south side, Cubs fans were non-existent. When i was in junior high in in the early 70s, here in the Southern Suburbs of Chicago (a pitching wedge away from NW Indiana) I was one of a handful of Sox fans in my class. Why? Television!
(combined with the fact the Cubs were regularly contending at that time, of course). But ask any Cub fan who became a Cub fan at an early age -- "I watched the games every summer afternoon on TV."

It reinforces my theory that the two greatest blunders the Sox have ever made were allowing Harry Carey to leave, and trying to put the Sox on pay per view long before the city and suburbs were wired for cable. If the Sox had been as TV saavy as the Cubs had been in those days, NW Indiana and the rest of "Cubdom" might be all wearing Silver and Black today.Yeah what he said... Cubs Suck! Go Sox!:tongue: