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Lip Man 1
08-05-2006, 12:01 PM
This column is absolutely first rate. Asks some great questions and looks at the perception of baseball compared to the other pro leagues regarding steroids / contracts ect.

Great reading!

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=crasnick_jerry&id=2539266

Lip

buehrle4cy05
08-05-2006, 05:13 PM
This column is absolutely first rate. Asks some great questions and looks at the perception of baseball compared to the other pro leagues regarding steroids / contracts ect.

Great reading!

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=crasnick_jerry&id=2539266

Lip

I read that yesterday and was glued to my computer screen. That may be the best column I've read on ESPN all year.

The Racehorse
08-05-2006, 07:05 PM
After reading the article, my only thought was this... if baseball feels like they're being unfairly held to a higher standard, then why don't they give their anti-trust exemption back to the US government? That way, MLB can truly be on the same level as the NFL, NBA, NHL etc.

The answer to that question: never.

Jerry Crasnick completely misses the mark.

SouthSide_HitMen
08-06-2006, 12:43 PM
After reading the article, my only thought was this... if baseball feels like they're being unfairly held to a higher standard, then why don't they give their anti-trust exemption back to the US government? That way, MLB can truly be on the same level as the NFL, NBA, NHL etc.

The answer to that question: never.

Jerry Crasnick completely misses the mark.

I agree. I could give a rats ass about the NFL or NBA. MLB needs to address their issue - something they have addressed minimally since it first became a public issue in September , 1988. Bud Selig has lied to Congress and to the American people in several instances and their "drug testing policy" does not test for steroids taken by Bonds and many other places and is a complete joke.

Ol' No. 2
08-07-2006, 09:41 AM
IMO, there's a pretty simple reason why people think of MLB differently from the NFL or NBA. Football players and basketball players are freaks of nature. How many 7-foot people do you know? How many 300 pound behemoths? I think that's one of the things that attract people to baseball - the players look like us and we hold them to higher standards than we do those who don't.

jdm2662
08-07-2006, 10:00 AM
IMO, if baseball didn't think they were above the law, the feds wouldn't have gotten on them as much. During the BALCO case, the feds requested certain tests from MLB. When the PA denied it, the feds said, ok, here's a warrant, turn them all over. Once they saw the results, we have an issue. Messing with the feds isn't the smartest thing to do. Just ask Martha Stewart that. As someone already said, when MLB is on the same level as the other professional sports teams, which they will never do, they will always be a target. Sucks to be them.

Madvora
08-07-2006, 10:00 AM
I love this out of nowhere rip on the Cubs...


"There is a peculiar intimacy between baseball players and the press, because you're talking about a season that begins in the middle of February and ends in late October," Will said. "Unless you're a Cubs fan, when it ends a lot sooner."

The Racehorse
08-07-2006, 11:55 AM
IMO, there's a pretty simple reason why people think of MLB differently from the NFL or NBA. Football players and basketball players are freaks of nature. How many 7-foot people do you know? How many 300 pound behemoths? I think that's one of the things that attract people to baseball - the players look like us and we hold them to higher standards than we do those who don't.

I disagree.

I might not know any 7-footers or few 300lb'ers, but when it comes to the fans in the stands, it seems that players who are different [size, shape, and especially skin color] are quicker to be judged [being held to a higher standard] because they don't look like us.

On the other hand, baseball players, because they do look like us, seemingly get many more free passes.