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Viva Medias B's
08-05-2006, 09:21 AM
In a close vote, Luis González was voted the "Best Diamondback Ever."

Today brings us the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers.

Chips
08-05-2006, 09:53 AM
Sandy Koufax. Nothing else needs to be said.

Johnny Mostil
08-05-2006, 10:32 AM
Having complained about how "recent" the DHL ballots have trended, I must say I'm a little surprised at how Brooklynese this one is . . .

TornLabrum
08-05-2006, 11:02 AM
I went with Robinson because he played so well despite all the **** he had to go through. He changed the face of the game.

LuvSox
08-05-2006, 11:23 AM
Robinson, Jackie

kevingrt
08-05-2006, 11:58 AM
Greatest is a tough adjective for this one. If it was best player it'd be Koufax, but since Jackie Robinson changed the face of the game you could consider Robinson the greatest for the sport. I don't know but I went with Koufax, one of the toughest picks yet.

Railsplitter
08-05-2006, 12:05 PM
In Brooklyn, Duke Snider.

Pitcher: Don Newcombe (Newk could hit)
In L.A. Steve Garvey in the field, Sandy Koufax on the mound.

SouthSide_HitMen
08-05-2006, 12:22 PM
Correct Answer - Duke Snider though I can see a vote for Jackie Robinson who had better peak years. Robinson's four best years topped Koufax' four best as far as win shares go. Don Drysdale had a better career with the Dodgers than Koufax.

Fenway
08-05-2006, 12:30 PM
New York after World War II was a baseball fans paradise. On any given day you could see Mays, Mantle or Snyder play.

Ebbetts Field may have been the best place to watch a game ever. 50 years later it still lives on in memory unlike any other park. O'Malley didn't want to leave but the City of New York ( Robert Moses ) wanted him to move to Queens where Shea Stadium is now. O'Malley wanted to build a dome in downtown Brooklyn over the tracks where the NY subway and LIRR meet. To him Queens was as far away as Los Angeles. Then the city of LA just gave him that real estate near downtown, O'Malley had no choice but to move and convinced the Giants to move with him.

Only now is that area O'Malley wanted to build being developed and it is for the NBA Nets.

SOXintheBURGH
08-05-2006, 12:42 PM
Koufax beat the Sox, so he gets my vote.

CWSpalehoseCWS
08-05-2006, 01:04 PM
Tough choice. I went with Koufax just barely over Robinson.

slobes
08-05-2006, 01:58 PM
Going on just pure talent, I vote Koufax. Obviously Jackie did more for the game though.

The Racehorse
08-05-2006, 02:27 PM
I went with Robinson because he played so well despite all the **** he had to go through. He changed the face of the game.

Per Wikipedia, look what crap he put up with prior to becoming a Dodger...


After leaving UCLA his senior year, Robinson enlisted in the U.S. Army (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Army) during World War II (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II). He enlisted with a segregated Battalion, the U.S. 761st Tank Battalion (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._761st_Tank_Battalion). While initially refused admission to Officer Candidate School (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Officer_Candidate_School_%28U.S._Army%29), he fought for it and eventually was accepted, graduating as a first lieutenant. While training in the Army at Fort Hood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Hood), Texas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas), Robinson refused to go to the back of a public bus. He was court-martialed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Court-martial) for insubordination (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insubordination) and, therefore, never made it to Europe with his unit. He later received an honorable discharge in 1944, after being acquitted of all charges at the court-martial.


FYI... the 761st Tank Battalion rolled with Patton.

Fenway
08-05-2006, 03:01 PM
Per Wikipedia, look what crap he put up with prior to becoming a Dodger...



FYI... the 761st Tank Battalion rolled with Patton.

What he went through in the service was exactly the reason Branch Ricky picked him to be the first. Rickey knew that whoever was the first would put up with so much and he wanted somebody who was mentally tough

TheKittle
08-05-2006, 03:07 PM
The greatest Brooklyn Dodger is Jackie Robinson.

The greatest LA Dodger is Sandy Koufax.

TDog
08-05-2006, 03:12 PM
I would have to go with Jackie Robinson. He was the face of the postwar Brooklyn Dodgers. But on this ballot all five of the players actually belong on the ballot and deserve consideration.

Fenway
08-05-2006, 03:18 PM
This was written after Robinson's last game as a Montreal Royal in 1946

When jubilant fans chased him for three blocks after the last game, a black journalist wrote, "It was probably the only day in history that a black man ran from a white mob with love instead of lynching on its mind." Fans later erected a statue of him near the ballpark

http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseballlibrary/ballplayers/R/Robinson_Jackie.stm

It was an honor to explain to my young son what the blue 42 meant at Fenway
http://www.expatmonkey.com/images/redsox/images/redsox29.jpg

DoItForDanPasqua
08-05-2006, 03:24 PM
I'm going to say Koufax because he simply was one of the best left handed pitchers ever. If the question was "greatest Dodger ever," I would say Robinson because his greatness was not limited to his baseball ability.

TornLabrum
08-05-2006, 03:42 PM
New York after World War II was a baseball fans paradise. On any given day you could see Mays, Mantle or Snyder play.

Cory played for the Dodgers?

TornLabrum
08-05-2006, 03:44 PM
Per Wikipedia, look what crap he put up with prior to becoming a Dodger...



FYI... the 761st Tank Battalion rolled with Patton.

They made a TV movie maybe 20-25 years ago about the Robinson bus incident. However, I don't think it was a public bus. I think it was a MILITARY bus, but I could be wrong.

The Racehorse
08-05-2006, 04:16 PM
They made a TV movie maybe 20-25 years ago about the Robinson bus incident. However, I don't think it was a public bus. I think it was a MILITARY bus, but I could be wrong.

Well, according to Wikipedia, it was a public bus, but you never know since anyone can upload information [factual or distorted] onto the website.

Btw, it wouldn't suprise me if it were a military bus, considering the incident happened four years before Truman signed executive order 9981 in 1948 [though it still took years for any semblance of equality for black soldiers in the military].

Segregation, Truman & the military... how did I get here?! :D:

Johnny Mostil
08-05-2006, 04:57 PM
Well, according to Wikipedia, it was a public bus, but you never know since anyone can upload information [factual or distorted] onto the website.

Btw, it wouldn't suprise me if it were a military bus, considering the incident happened four years before Truman signed executive order 9981 in 1948 [though it still took years for any semblance of equality for black soldiers in the military].

Segregation, Truman & the military... how did I get here?! :D:

FWIW, here's what Roger Kahn says about the incident in The Boys of Summer (p. 357):


After a general order forbade segregation within military installations, a driver ordered Robinson to move to the rear of an Army bus. Robinson stood his ground. The driver called the military police, and a captain named Gerald Bear wanted to know if Robinson 'was trying to start a race riot or something.' Robinson spoke heatedly about civil rights. Captain Bear's secretary said Robinson had 'some nerve being sassy.'

In the ensuing court-martial, Robinson stood accused of disturbing the peace, of disobeying an order, of acting with disrespect toward a civilian woman and of 'contemptuously bowing, giving sloppy salutes to Captain Bear and repeating several times, "Okay, sir. Okay, sir."' Robinson's lawyer suggested that this was not a case in which the articles of war had been violated; rather a few people 'were working vengeance against an uppity black man.' The court-martial concurred and dismissed all charges.

This was the man Branch Rickey hired . . .

Brian26
08-05-2006, 04:58 PM
Sandy Koufax. Nothing else needs to be said.

Before I open these threads now, I think about my choice before I even look at the poll and get swayed one way or another. My initial choice was Jackie Robinson.

TDog
08-05-2006, 05:36 PM
Cory played for the Dodgers?

Clemons pitched for the Sox in 1997, so I guess anything is possible.

samram
08-05-2006, 07:46 PM
I went with Snider, but Jackie is right there with him. Robinson is certainly the most important player in team history, if not MLB history.

WS in 05
08-05-2006, 08:02 PM
Tight race

asindc
08-05-2006, 08:31 PM
I went with Robinson because he played so well despite all the **** he had to go through. He changed the face of the game.

Exactly. Though I won't argue with anyone who voted for Koufax, Robinson played well under the most intense pressure any major leaguer ever had to face. That should be accounted for.

asindc
08-05-2006, 08:32 PM
Well, according to Wikipedia, it was a public bus, but you never know since anyone can upload information [factual or distorted] onto the website.

Btw, it wouldn't suprise me if it were a military bus, considering the incident happened four years before Truman signed executive order 9981 in 1948 [though it still took years for any semblance of equality for black soldiers in the military].

Segregation, Truman & the military... how did I get here?! :D:

It was a military bus. The incident was the subject of the movie "The Court Martial of Jackie Robinson," with a young Andre Braugher playing the lead.

Grzegorz
08-05-2006, 10:49 PM
Going on pure talent Pete Reiser.