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View Full Version : What caused the Met following?


getonbckthr
07-17-2006, 03:36 AM
I was just thinking being that Mets are relatively young in this league, and having the all might Yankees in the same city, where did they get their following from? Was it bitter Brooklyn Dodger and Giant fans who just couldn't stand the Yanks?

TDog
07-17-2006, 04:25 AM
I was just thinking being that Mets are relatively young in this league, and having the all might Yankees in the same city, where did they get their following from? Was it bitter Brooklyn Dodger and Giant fans who just couldn't stand the Yanks?

I came of age baseball-wise in 1969. My earlier memories are of the Sox losing out in the '67 pennant race, the Sox losing 10 straight to begin 1968 (pattern established apparently) etc. in addition to a Sox-Cubs game, I think in 1964 I don't remember the Mets being really bad, but I have read some books.

Apparently there was resentment among fans of the two National League teams, who didn't support the Yankees. If you're from Brooklyn could you support the Yankees who beat up on you in the World Series for about a decade? It would be easier for a Sox fan to support the Cubs. To unify the Dodgers and Giants fans, the Mets paid homage to both teams in their uniforms.

It probably helped that the Yankees stopped winning pennants in 1964 and the Mets won the World Series in 1969.

TornLabrum
07-17-2006, 09:06 AM
The Mets phenomenon started earlier than '64 iirc. The Mets attracted the dienfranchised NL fans in New York, but they gave them something else: losing on a grand scale. Marvelous Marv Thronebery became a hero for his ineptitude. It was a phenomenon.

Baby Fisk
07-17-2006, 09:18 AM
Not everyone in New York is a Yankees fan.

KMKsuburbannoise
07-17-2006, 10:40 AM
i think it is because they are so young and a lot of people are getting tired of the yankees. it also doesn't hurt that they are playing good baseball.

eriqjaffe
07-17-2006, 11:03 AM
The Mets phenomenon started earlier than '64 iirc. The Mets attracted the dienfranchised NL fans in New York, but they gave them something else: losing on a grand scale. Marvelous Marv Thronebery became a hero for his ineptitude. It was a phenomenon.This all sounds so familiar, but I'm having a hard time figuring out where else I've seen something like this...

viagracat
07-17-2006, 11:23 AM
I'm guessing many former NY Giants and Brooklyn Dodger fans couldn't stand the Yankees and weren't going to jump on their bandwagon under any circumstances after their teams moved to California. But as California is, oh, about 3,000 miles from New York, it made it hard to follow them, especially with all those late West Coast starts. So when the Mets started in 1962, there was a natural fan base they exploited, and their early ineptitude was in its own weird way endearing.

Does that remind you of somebody? :rolleyes:

Baby Fisk
07-17-2006, 11:32 AM
So when the Mets started in 1962, there was a natural fan base they exploited, and their early ineptitude was in its own weird way endearing.

Does that remind you of somebody? :rolleyes:
The difference is that the Mets were able to win the championship twice and reward their fans. In 1969 they were the miracle underdogs who pulled it off. In 1986 they were the despicable bad guys -- not a very loveable bunch. Having tasted victory, Mets fans no longer tolerate losing.

MushMouth
07-17-2006, 11:58 AM
Queens is a huge borough - it's the hometown team for many New Yorkers. Even in New Jersey, I have a bunch of friends who became Met Fans growing up... I'm not sure why, maybe they just hated the jackbag Yanks fans and enjoyed the Mets experience whose families were either Dodgers or Giants fans in the old days.

RKMeibalane
07-17-2006, 12:22 PM
The difference is that the Mets were able to win the championship twice and reward their fans. In 1969 they were the miracle underdogs who pulled it off. In 1986 they were the despicable bad guys -- not a very loveable bunch. Having tasted victory, Mets fans no longer tolerate losing.

No, they don't, as evidenced by what happened six years later. As the 1992 season dawned, expectations were high in the Big Apple. The Mets had signed All Star Bobby Bonilla to lead a revamped offense built around Howard Johnson, the reigning home run champion, and Eddie Murray, the steady and brilliant first baseman, signed away from the Dodgers the previous winter.

Bret Saberhagen was accquired in a trade with the Royals, joining Dwight Gooden, David Cone, and Sid Fernandez in the starting rotation, with John Franco in the 'pen. The Mets were loaded, and big things were about to happen. Or so everyone thought...

The Mets finished with a 72-90 record, third worst in the National League. Bonilla was a disaster. He was bad on the road and worse at home, earning him the nickname "Bobby Boo" from angry fans. Howard Johnson's power dissappeared, and Vince Coleman couldn't stay healthy. Mets fans were pissed and called for Jeff Torborg's job. Their wishes came true in May of '93, as Torborg was fired and replaced by Dallas Green, but the Mets were even worse that year, finishing with baseball's worst record.

I'm sure Baby Fisk is just thrilled reliving these memories. :cool:

Baby Fisk
07-17-2006, 12:31 PM
No, they don't, as evidenced by what happened six years later. As the 1992 season dawned, expectations were high in the Big Apple. The Mets had signed All Star Bobby Bonilla to lead a revamped offense built around Howard Johnson, the reigning home run champion, and Eddie Murray, the steady and brilliant first baseman, signed away from the Dodgers the previous winter.

Bret Saberhagen was accquired in a trade with the Royals, joining Dwight Gooden, David Cone, and Sid Fernandez in the starting rotation, with John Franco in the 'pen. The Mets were loaded, and big things were about to happen. Or so everyone thought...

The Mets finished with a 72-90 record, third worst in the National League. Bonilla was a disaster. He was bad on the road and worse at home, earning him the nickname "Bobby Boo" from angry fans. Howard Johnson's power dissappeared, and Vince Coleman couldn't stay healthy. Mets fans were pissed and called for Jeff Torborg's job. Their wishes came true in May of '93, as Torborg was fired and replaced by Dallas Green, but the Mets were even worse that year, finishing with baseball's worst record.

I'm sure Baby Fisk is just thrilled reliving these memories. :cool:
I was just brooding over the 1999 NLCS. Way to go, Kenny Rogers!

Thanks for the distraction(?)

SouthSide_HitMen
07-17-2006, 01:16 PM
What caused the Mets following?

Casey Stengle
Gil Hodges
Tom Seaver
Jerry Koosman
Tug McGraw
Rusty Staub
George Foster
Dave Kingman
Gary Carter
Keith Hernandez
Dwight Gooden
Darryl Strawberry
Lenny Dykstra
"El" Sid Fernandez
Davey Johnson
Howard Johnson
Ron Darling
John Franco
David Cone
Mike Piazza
Al Leiter
David Wright
Jose Reyes
Pedro Martinez

That and 11 million people in the New York Metro area (as well as fans nationwide (and as Baby Fisk proves well into Canada)) and four penants and two World Championships is what caused the Mets following.

You Gotta Believe!!!

:cool:

Lip Man 1
07-17-2006, 01:28 PM
From the time period from 1965 through 1975 the Yankees were an awful team. During that period in 1969 the 'Miracle Mets' won the World Series and played in another one. (1973)

From the time period from around 1979 through 1993 the Yankees were a bad franchise. During that period the mets won the World series in 1986.

There you go.

Lip

Baby Fisk
07-17-2006, 01:48 PM
Casey Stengle
Gil Hodges
Tom Seaver
Jerry Koosman
Tug McGraw
Rusty Staub
George Foster
Dave Kingman
Gary Carter
Keith Hernandez
Dwight Gooden
Darryl Strawberry
Lenny Dykstra
"El" Sid Fernandez
Davey Johnson
Howard Johnson
Ron Darling
John Franco
David Cone
Mike Piazza
Al Leiter
David Wright
Jose Reyes
Pedro Martinez

Where is the love for Ron Swoboda? :cool:

Also, kids (of all ages) are crazy for this guy:

http://tomwatson.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/mr_met.jpg

SouthSide_HitMen
07-17-2006, 02:14 PM
Where is the love for Ron Swoboda? :cool:

The entire 1969 team will always be loved by the Mets faithful.

What GMs Bob Scheffing & Joe McDonald did after dumping Nolan Ryan & Tom Seaver respectively for Jim Fregosi (Ryan) & Pat Zachry, Steve Henderson (Seaver) not so much.

Uncle_Patrick
07-17-2006, 02:21 PM
Where is the love for Ron Swoboda? :cool:

Also, kids (of all ages) are crazy for this guy:

http://tomwatson.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/mr_met.jpg

I remember when he was beheaded on Conan O'Brien.

KMKsuburbannoise
07-17-2006, 02:37 PM
I think it all started when Robin Ventura was a Met

peeonwrigley
07-17-2006, 02:46 PM
My mom's family grew up in Brooklyn as Dodgers fans. Not too practical to follow a team 3,000 miles away, so when the Mets started up it was natural to follow them.

PKalltheway
07-18-2006, 03:16 AM
I think the Mets' colors are a combination of the old Brooklyn Dodgers colors (blue and white), and the old New York Giants colors (orange and black). The black didn't really come into the uniform until the late 1990's though. Their interlocking "NY" logo on their hat was the old New York Giants logo.

MVP
07-18-2006, 05:19 PM
Many of the Mets original fans were old Giants and Dodgers fans. That's why the Mets chose the colors blue and orange. The blue was meant to attract the old Dodgers fans and the orange was meant to attract the old Giants fans.

DrummerGeorgefan
07-18-2006, 09:42 PM
All my buddies (23-27 y/o) from NY are Mets fans and they hold loyalty because of the mid-late 80s teams