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ChampaignSoxFan
07-11-2006, 09:34 PM
I don't know if this has been covered before, but I have noticed that Ichiro Suzuki is usually referred to by broadcasters as just Ichiro.

Is this: (1) in deference to a Japanese linguistic custom, (2) a Japanese fan habit, (3) something like Pele/Cher/Madonna superstar, or (4) a combination of those?

I've never noticed the Sox's Iguchi referred by his first name only, so I was leaning toward options 2 or 3--but I don't know anything about Japanese baseball or language either.

Just curious.

Sox of White
07-11-2006, 10:48 PM
I believe Japanese players typically have their first names on their jerseys in Japan, opposed to the last names. Ichiro requested that his first name be put on his jersey instead of his last name to take this Japanese tradition to his Major League career. Plus, like you said with the Madonna Cher thing, all you need is Ichiro.

TornLabrum
07-11-2006, 11:16 PM
I believe Japanese players typically have their first names on their jerseys in Japan, opposed to the last names. Ichiro requested that his first name be put on his jersey instead of his last name to take this Japanese tradition to his Major League career. Plus, like you said with the Madonna Cher thing, all you need is Ichiro.

However...In Japan, the surname is given first so Ichiro is his last name, but in the West it would be his first name. So technically in Japan they wear their last names on their uniforms.

In other words, in Japan his name is Suzuki Ichiro.

TheOldRoman
07-11-2006, 11:23 PM
from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ichiro_Suzuki):

It was during the 1994 season that he began to use "Ichiro" instead of "Suzuki" on his uniform. Suzuki is the second most common surname in Japan, and his manager introduced the idea as a publicity stunt to help create a new image for what had been a relatively weak team, as well as a way to distinguish their rising star. Initially, Ichiro disliked the practice and was embarrassed by it, but "Ichiro" was a household name by the end of the season and he was flooded with endorsement offers.

StockdaleForVeep
07-12-2006, 01:21 AM
In all sports, they are refered last name, then first, as reversed as we do here

For example, here we say "frank thomas!"
but in japan he'd be refered to as, thomas, FRAAAAAAAANNNNNK!" they put the emphasis on the first name

RKMeibalane
07-12-2006, 01:35 AM
However...In Japan, the surname is given first so Ichiro is his last name, but in the West it would be his first name. So technically in Japan they wear their last names on their uniforms.

In other words, in Japan his name is Suzuki Ichiro.

They also do it in certain parts of China. I had a chemistry teacher in college whose name was Meng-Chih Su, but he always signed his name Chih-Meng Su.

There's also Yao Ming to consider, as he has "Yao" on the back of his jersey.

rookie
07-12-2006, 02:37 PM
They also do it in certain parts of China. I had a chemistry teacher in college whose name was Meng-Chih Su, but he always signed his name Chih-Meng Su.

There's also Yao Ming to consider, as he has "Yao" on the back of his jersey.

So is Yao his first or last name? I assume last, and all of us Americans just assume it is his first.

KMKsuburbannoise
07-12-2006, 03:16 PM
i don't know about their customs but I wish my name was Suzuki, that sounds badass

SoxFanPrope
07-12-2006, 03:23 PM
I believe Japanese players typically have their first names on their jerseys in Japan, opposed to the last names. Ichiro requested that his first name be put on his jersey instead of his last name to take this Japanese tradition to his Major League career. Plus, like you said with the Madonna Cher thing, all you need is Ichiro.
However...In Japan, the surname is given first so Ichiro is his last name, but in the West it would be his first name. So technically in Japan they wear their last names on their uniforms.

In other words, in Japan his name is Suzuki Ichiro.
In all sports, they are refered last name, then first, as reversed as we do here

For example, here we say "frank thomas!"
but in japan he'd be refered to as, thomas, FRAAAAAAAANNNNNK!" they put the emphasis on the first name
They also do it in certain parts of China. I had a chemistry teacher in college whose name was Meng-Chih Su, but he always signed his name Chih-Meng Su.

There's also Yao Ming to consider, as he has "Yao" on the back of his jersey.
So is Yao his first or last name? I assume last, and all of us Americans just assume it is his first.

Does anybody have an aspirin??

JohnBasedowYoda
07-12-2006, 03:25 PM
anyone know if Tomo Ohka ever played with Iguchi? I got his autograph.

ondafarm
07-13-2006, 02:14 PM
Ichiro's surname is Suzuki, a very common name indeed in Japan. It means 'close to the bell' or 'within earshot'. Like most Japanese last names it is a generic geographic reference. This one means the original holder of the name either worked at a profession within the village or his field was within earshot of the central alarm bell, very close indeed.

Ichiro is a moderately uncommon male given name.

Japanese ballplayers wear their surname on their jersey, thus I would have been "Farm". For years Japanese teams, especially in the Central League, refused to put names on jerseys. Then somebody did and everybody changed within a coupel of years. Lately, a few teams seem to be going retor and removing the names.

When Ichiro was in the minors he had "Suzuki, I." on his jersey, until his manager suggested the change.

ondafarm
07-13-2006, 02:20 PM
anyone know if Tomo Ohka ever played with Iguchi? I got his autograph.

They played in opposite leagues in Japan. Ohka played for the BayStars of the Central League in Yokohama. Previously know as the Robins and then the Whales. (Where'd they get those names?)

Iguchi played in the Pacific League. I'm sure the two have met.

mrfourni
07-13-2006, 02:47 PM
http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:kzFFhMH2OjkueM:www.havokstudios.com/images/aim/miketyson/03-piston_honda.gif (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.havokstudios.com/images/aim/miketyson/03-piston_honda.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.havokstudios.com/aimicons.php&h=50&w=50&sz=2&hl=en&start=9&tbnid=kzFFhMH2OjkueM:&tbnh=50&tbnw=50&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpiston%2Bhonda%2Btyson%26svnum%3D10%2 6hl%3Den%26lr%3D)

Is my first name Piston? Or is it Honda?

I'll give you a TKO from Tokyo if you are wrong.

hi im skot
07-13-2006, 03:48 PM
http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:kzFFhMH2OjkueM:www.havokstudios.com/images/aim/miketyson/03-piston_honda.gif (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.havokstudios.com/images/aim/miketyson/03-piston_honda.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.havokstudios.com/aimicons.php&h=50&w=50&sz=2&hl=en&start=9&tbnid=kzFFhMH2OjkueM:&tbnh=50&tbnw=50&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpiston%2Bhonda%2Btyson%26svnum%3D10%2 6hl%3Den%26lr%3D)

Is my first name Piston? Or is it Honda?

I'll give you a TKO from Tokyo if you are wrong.

LOL

That totally just made my day.

chaerulez
07-13-2006, 08:52 PM
So is Yao his first or last name? I assume last, and all of us Americans just assume it is his first.

Ming is his surname (meaning last name or family name). I think it's a cultural thing with a little bit of a marketing ploy mixed in with it. Typically in Asian countries people aren't refered to by their last name. And your name is usually said with the surname first. I'm talking about how in American culture how people will just refer to people they know by last name. I'm Korean and all my friends just call me Chae, but that would never happen in Korea. I always found it funny how the western media refers to Kim Jong-Il as such, but we don't do that for any other Korean (I've never heard any media member say Park Chan-Ho or Choi Hee-Seop). And the whole surname first is the proper way in Korea.

TornLabrum
07-13-2006, 10:02 PM
Ming is his surname (meaning last name or family name). I think it's a cultural thing with a little bit of a marketing ploy mixed in with it. Typically in Asian countries people aren't refered to by their last name. And your name is usually said with the surname first. I'm talking about how in American culture how people will just refer to people they know by last name. I'm Korean and all my friends just call me Chae, but that would never happen in Korea. I always found it funny how the western media refers to Kim Jong-Il as such, but we don't do that for any other Korean (I've never heard any media member say Park Chan-Ho or Choi Hee-Seop). And the whole surname first is the proper way in Korea.

So you're saying that in China Yao Ming is Ming Yao? Or did I just completely misunderstand you?

eriqjaffe
07-14-2006, 08:54 AM
So you're saying that in China Yao Ming is Ming Yao? Or did I just completely misunderstand you?IIRC, in China, Yao Ming is still Yao Ming. For some reason, western culture doesn't usually reverse the "family" name and the "given" name form Chinese as they usually do for Japanese and Korean.

rookie
07-14-2006, 03:08 PM
http://www.nba.com/playerfile/yao_ming/bio.html


In Life
Full name is Yao Ming, with Yao his surname and Ming his given name … his father, Yao Zhi Yuan, stands 6-foot-7 and his mother, Fang Feng Di, stands 6-foot-3 … his mother played for China’s National Team …


Well, as confusing this has all been, it's been very interesting. And not as confusing as reading music vertical and right-to-left as they do is traditional Japanese music.