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View Full Version : Can you be a Sox fan AND a Cubs fan?


D'Sphitz
07-02-2006, 11:12 AM
I'm a lifelong Minnesota resident and Twins fan, so I don't have the luxury of picking from two hometown teams and don't really understand the inner-city rivalries between cities with multiple teams. The feeling I get from most Sox fans is that the Cubs are their hated arch-enemy and must be despised unconditionally (and vice versa). The same goes for Yanks/Mets, ESPN touts the NY "Subway Series" every year as the great showdown of nemeses, and there is no love lost between the fans.

Personally, I can't get enough baseball, and would absolutely love two hometown clubs to root for. Why can't the Cubs and Sox peacefully co-exist? Now granted, the Cubs blow, but they don't compete directly with the Sox (with the obvious exception of a few inter-league games) so I guess I just don't understand why someone would have so much ill will for their other hometown club.

Another related question, how do you pick "your club"? I assume the biggest influence would be parents, but is there a geographical significance, such as north side = Cubs fans, south side = Sox fans? I can't see why anyone would choose to be a Cubs fan, other than being a demented masochist.

P.S. Nice shot yesterday AJ, damnit will you start losing so we can gain some ground!?!

voodoochile
07-02-2006, 11:16 AM
No... Not if you intend to be a serious fan.

TornLabrum
07-02-2006, 11:29 AM
I was a fan of both teams for about forty years. I grew up 60 miles away from the city, saw the same broadcast teams do both teams' games for the first dozen of those years. I always preferred the Sox to the Cubs because they were the better team, but in the late '60s I went to more Cubs games just because the Sox looked about as bad as the Cubs do now.

When I was able to afford tickets I'd always go to more Sox games, and finally about eleven or twelve years ago, I finally decided I had to make a decision. I was involved with a club that was a predecessor of the Windy City Sox Fans. I was going to more Sox games. The Sox were again the better team. I aksed myself, "Who is going to win a pennant first, Jerry Reinsdorf or the Tribune Co.?" I made my decision and haven't looked back.

But yeah, I think if you didn't grow up in Chicago, you can be a fan of both teams. It's much harder, though, I suspect, when you grow up in the city.

chaerulez
07-02-2006, 11:34 AM
I was a fan of both teams for about forty years. I grew up 60 miles away from the city, saw the same broadcast teams do both teams' games for the first dozen of those years. I always preferred the Sox to the Cubs because they were the better team, but in the late '60s I went to more Cubs games just because the Sox looked about as bad as the Cubs do now.

When I was able to afford tickets I'd always go to more Sox games, and finally about eleven or twelve years ago, I finally decided I had to make a decision. I was involved with a club that was a predecessor of the Windy City Sox Fans. I was going to more Sox games. The Sox were again the better team. I aksed myself, "Who is going to win a pennant first, Jerry Reinsdorf or the Tribune Co.?" I made my decision and haven't looked back.

But yeah, I think if you didn't grow up in Chicago, you can be a fan of both teams. It's much harder, though, I suspect, when you grow up in the city.

I was a fan of both teams for a while too. I think a lot of that has to do with me growing up in Seattle from ages 7 to 11, when you really start getting into sports. I didn't have people around me telling me I had to choose, and Seattle is a pretty tortured sports city. I knew I was from the Chicago area, so I always liked the Chicago teams (plus my dad is a Sox fan). Now that I'm older and I can see how organizations operate, I really am just indifferent about the Cubs. I don't care what they do, as long as they lose when the Sox play them.

MarySwiss
07-02-2006, 11:50 AM
I was born in Bridgeport and, even though we moved to the North Side when I was 12 years old, I have never for a moment considered being a Cubs fan. My husband, however, was born on the North Side and claims to be a "Chicago" fan. However, he'd also be the first to admit he is nowhere near the fanatical, maniac sports fan that I am.

So I think geography has a lot to do with it, but probably also intensity. I don't think you can be bliindly devoted to more than one team. I am also a D'Backs fan, mainly because I live here and they're the only NL team I give a damn about, but if by some miracle the D'Backs played the Sox in the World Series, NO QUESTION which team I'd be rooting for.

Also, my entire family--going back to my grandparents--have been lifelong Sox fans. Neither of my husband's parents were very into sports. So that plays a part as well.

Beer Can Chicken
07-02-2006, 11:56 AM
I don't think you can be a fan of both but for a slightly different reason than most. I don't think you can be real fan of ANY 2 teams in the same sport. You can't give your full heart to 2 teams, it'd be like having 2 wives. And at some point, they'll play each other and you'll be in quite the predicament.
Don't get me wrong, I "like" some other MLB teams, but I'm only a FAN of one, the White Sox.

DumpJerry
07-02-2006, 12:15 PM
First of all, :welcome: .
Secondly, to answer your question: No!
I lived in Minnesota (St. Paul) for 7 years (1980-87). When the Sox won the Division in 1983, I was very vocal about it (some called it "obnoxious," but I have no idea why). When the Cubs went to the playoffs in 1984, I was quiet as a mouse about it and refused to watch the games. My friends could not understand my behvior. All I had to say to those who lived in Minneapolis was "how do you like living in St. Paul?" That's when they got it.:cool:

viagracat
07-02-2006, 12:21 PM
I don't know a single Chicago-area native that truly roots for both teams equally. I do know a handful of out-of town natives that go both ways, but they usually go one way or the other eventually. So no, you would truly be the rare breed that does so. You will eventually pick the Sox over the other team. :smile:

Brian26
07-02-2006, 12:22 PM
No... Not if you intend to be a serious fan.

Exactly.

Palehose13
07-02-2006, 12:25 PM
No, you can't be a real fan of both teams. I don't think it is that hard to understand and the same situation can be said for other sports and regioanl rivals. Jets/Giants in Football, Indiana U/Purdue in College basketball, and Florida/Florida State/Miami in college football.

At this stage in the game, I think your loyalty is decided by your parents. From what I understand the north side/south side division was much more obvious years ago. Now it more like north side/ south side "roots". My mom grew up 5 blocks from Comiskey in Bridgeport and my dad, in Gage Park (still south side), idolized Nellie Fox.

DumpJerry
07-02-2006, 12:28 PM
No, you can't be a real fan of both teams. I don't think it is that hard to understand and the same situation can be said for other sports and regioanl rivals. Jets/Giants in Football, Indiana U/Purdue in College basketball, and Florida/Florida State/Miami in college football.

At this stage in the game, I think your loyalty is decided by your parents. From what I understand the north side/south side division was much more obvious years ago. Now it more like north side/ south side "roots". My mom grew up 5 blocks from Comiskey in Bridgeport and my dad, in Gage Park (still south side), idolized Nellie Fox.
Actually, we use the geography thing as a way to make Cub fans feel good. It is really a function of IQ. Over 100=Sox fan. Under 100=Cub fan.

viagracat
07-02-2006, 12:35 PM
No, you can't be a real fan of both teams. I don't think it is that hard to understand and the same situation can be said for other sports and regioanl rivals. Jets/Giants in Football, Indiana U/Purdue in College basketball, and Florida/Florida State/Miami in college football.

At this stage in the game, I think your loyalty is decided by your parents. From what I understand the north side/south side division was much more obvious years ago. Now it more like north side/ south side "roots". My mom grew up 5 blocks from Comiskey in Bridgeport and my dad, in Gage Park (still south side), idolized Nellie Fox.

I dunno; I have no South Side roots; my parents and most of my friends growing up were Cub fans and I even married a Northwest Side Cub fan. Yet I've been a die-hard Sox fan for as long as I can remember; probably because when I started following baseball in the mid 1960s, the Sox were a good team and the Cubs were pretty much as bad then as they are now. Thank God. :smile:

Palehose13
07-02-2006, 12:37 PM
I dunno; I have no South Side roots; my parents and most of my friends growing up were Cub fans and I even married a Northwest Side Cub fan. Yet I've been a die-hard Sox fan for as long as I can remember; probably because when I started following baseball in the mid 1960s, the Sox were a good team and the Cubs were pretty much as bad then as they are now. Thank God. :smile:

Of course there are exceptions...

hsnterprize
07-02-2006, 06:32 PM
I fell into that "fan of both teams" mainly when I was in the Army from 1989 to 1993. I wasn't a die-hard Sox fan yet, and I wasn't raised to be for-or-against either baseball team because neither one of them had any long-lasting success. Honestly, I was leaning more towards the Sox than the Cubs before I went into the Army, but I wasn't as into the SOx then as I am now. Anyway, I did the "both teams" thing because I was bragging a LOT of about Chicago while I was in the service. And a lot of people outside of Chicago immediately associated Chicago baseball with the Cubs. There was 1 guy from the south side who was in my basic training platoon who was a White Sox fan, but that was it. And I took a lot of flack from non-Chicagoans in 1993 when Michael Jordan announced his first retirement...especially before the 1st pitch of game 1 of the ALCS vs. Toronto. Still, it was nice to see new Comiskey Park in the national spotlight...even though the Sox lost that series, and the potential 1994 World Champions never got their chance to prove to the world why they were the best.

Once I came home, I knew I had a decision to make...either the Sox or the Cubs. So, because of my years of watching people like Carlton Fisk, Harold Baines, LaMarr Hoyt, Britt Burns, Floyd Bannister, Scott Fletcher, and others, I decided to return to the south side love. It also helped that everytime I went to visit a relative, I would always ride by the old Comiskey Park.

As far as being a fan of both teams now, I wouldn't even think of such a thing. IMHO, if you're a fan of "both teams" you're not a serious fan of either one. Surely, there are a lot of out-of-towners living in Chicago who don't have any personal loyalty towards either squad, but sooner or later, they'll have to make the same choice me and other fans have made. As for me, I'm SO GLAD I picked the Sox. There's nothing like being a White Sox fan, and I wouldn't trade that for the world.

chisoxmike
07-02-2006, 06:35 PM
No.

jenn2080
07-02-2006, 06:37 PM
That is a big fat negative. One or the other!

SOXintheBURGH
07-02-2006, 06:52 PM
Nein!

eastchicagosoxfan
07-02-2006, 07:10 PM
I'm a lifelong Minnesota resident and Twins fan, so I don't have the luxury of picking from two hometown teams and don't really understand the inner-city rivalries between cities with multiple teams. The feeling I get from most Sox fans is that the Cubs are their hated arch-enemy and must be despised unconditionally (and vice versa). The same goes for Yanks/Mets, ESPN touts the NY "Subway Series" every year as the great showdown of nemeses, and there is no love lost between the fans.

Personally, I can't get enough baseball, and would absolutely love two hometown clubs to root for. Why can't the Cubs and Sox peacefully co-exist? Now granted, the Cubs blow, but they don't compete directly with the Sox (with the obvious exception of a few inter-league games) so I guess I just don't understand why someone would have so much ill will for their other hometown club.

Another related question, how do you pick "your club"? I assume the biggest influence would be parents, but is there a geographical significance, such as north side = Cubs fans, south side = Sox fans? I can't see why anyone would choose to be a Cubs fan, other than being a demented masochist.

P.S. Nice shot yesterday AJ, damnit will you start losing so we can gain some ground!?!
I think you're asking the wrong people, in a sense. This board is made up of die-hard Sox fans. I can't imagine being a Cub fan. I do know a few people who are fans of both teams. I think it's based on the lack of winning that allowed for it. Obviously, that's changed. I won't root against the Cubs anymore. As for geography, Northwest Indiana was a big Sox area 20-30 years ago. Now, it's got plenty of Cub fans, but in my opinion, I think most are under 40 years old or so.

SOXSINCE'70
07-02-2006, 07:17 PM
:hawk
"No!"

SouthSide_HitMen
07-02-2006, 07:38 PM
I know people that are fans of both teams. With the jackass media and interleague nonsense it is harder at this point to do it.

I think if you love outside of Chicago it could work out. I don't like the Cubs and have been a Sox fan since pre Kindergarten but I have nothing against fans of both teams. I have respect for Cubs fans who are true baseball fans but not of the yahoos who don't know their ass from a hole in the ground and are fans of "Wrigley Field" / the beer garden.

I don't agree that the Cubs vs. Sox "rivalry" is a big as real rivalries - i.e. teams that have been playing each other for decades.

Army vs. Navy, Bears vs. Packers, Yankees vs. Red Sox, Dodgers vs. Giants,
Alabama vs. Auburn, etc. are real rivalries. Cubs vs. Sox have more to do with fans and media hype - not the actual teams or the competition.

We have 54 games over the past decade or so with interleague and 6 games 100 years ago. We have played more games against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. Enough said.

SoxandtheCityTee
07-02-2006, 07:43 PM
I know of several types of "All-Chicago" fan. One guy is a real fan of the game, very knowledgable, and he makes a big deal of liking both teams -- partial season tickets for both, hats and gear for both teams, a half-and-half hat (specially made) etc. An unusual type, in my experience. I knew another guy like that -- ostentatiously rooted for both teams -- but he's gone now.

More common is the casual fan that likes it if both teams win, but doesn't really care if either loses, or just likes having two teams in town, two ballparks to go to, that sort of thing.

Finally we have the Chicago fan who grew up here, rooting for one team, but now lives somewhere else and hangs out there with other transplanted Chicagoans, some of whom root for the other team. Such folks sometimes stop hating the other Chicago team and start watching their games and even rooting them on (except when the teams play each other) because solidarity amongst the Chicagoans, all of them stranded in some place where they have some other team(s) or sports shoved down their throats, is more important than the intra-city rivalry.

Realist
07-02-2006, 08:26 PM
I have a buddy that is a great baseball fan and a fan of both teams. When pushed he'll lean towards the Cubs a super tiny little bit, but he's extremely knowledgable about the sport and truly a fan of both teams. He grew up downtown so I imagine he really didn't feel the pressure to pick one team over the other.

TheDarkGundam
07-02-2006, 08:34 PM
No. The way I've always seen it is that you can't be a fan of both, but you can like both. A Sox fan loves the Sox above all other teams, a Cub fan loves the cubs above all other teams.

vegyrex
07-02-2006, 09:05 PM
Sure you can be a fan of both teams.....

But why would you want to? :?:

RealMenWearBlack
07-02-2006, 09:10 PM
I have no South Side roots. I'm a Sox fan because my favorite player growing up was Frank Thomas and I got to go to my first game through the Sox academic achievement program. I really can only think of one person that I know of that is a true fan of both teams. My best friend decided to be a Sox fan when he was younger even though he was from West Rogers Park and his dad was a Cubs fan. His dad didn't like that he was a Sox fan at first, but he eventually became ok with it and he follows both teams now.

Pierzynski 12
07-02-2006, 09:12 PM
I hate the Cubs 24/7, 365 days.:gulp:

Fuller_Schettman
07-02-2006, 10:03 PM
My brother used to swear he was a fan of both, but his total lack of enthusiasm last October was the real tell. He is a Cub fan, just like his mother!

The only place I think you canbe a fan of both teams is here in the Bay Area. It seems very common that people claim both teams. That is SO foreign to me! Now 49ers/Raiders is a totally different deal, but as baseball goes either team is fair game. Although having that sexy new ballpark has been a great drawing card for the Giants, but the A's will get their turn...

gbergman
07-02-2006, 10:18 PM
Nope! If Hangar18 was still around he would of gone insane seeing this. Thank God he took his issues elsewhere

Grzegorz
07-02-2006, 10:22 PM
I was a fan of both teams for about forty years.

Sure you can be fans of both. I believe it is easier when you're young. I loved those Kessinger/Beckert Cubs. They were always of TV and those west coast swings were great to watch when you're on summer break.

But, as I grew older the Cubbies became corporate and practitioners of class warfare. At that point it was easy to discard the pretenders and focus on the team I was raised on.

Uncle_Patrick
07-02-2006, 11:03 PM
I'm a lifelong Minnesota resident and Twins fan, so I don't have the luxury of picking from two hometown teams and don't really understand the inner-city rivalries between cities with multiple teams. The feeling I get from most Sox fans is that the Cubs are their hated arch-enemy and must be despised unconditionally (and vice versa). The same goes for Yanks/Mets, ESPN touts the NY "Subway Series" every year as the great showdown of nemeses, and there is no love lost between the fans.

Personally, I can't get enough baseball, and would absolutely love two hometown clubs to root for. Why can't the Cubs and Sox peacefully co-exist? Now granted, the Cubs blow, but they don't compete directly with the Sox (with the obvious exception of a few inter-league games) so I guess I just don't understand why someone would have so much ill will for their other hometown club.

Another related question, how do you pick "your club"? I assume the biggest influence would be parents, but is there a geographical significance, such as north side = Cubs fans, south side = Sox fans? I can't see why anyone would choose to be a Cubs fan, other than being a demented masochist.

P.S. Nice shot yesterday AJ, damnit will you start losing so we can gain some ground!?!
IMO, its very, very difficult to be a fan of both hometown teams if you grow up in the area, at least as far as Chicago goes. You have to understand that this is a rivalry that goes back for generations. In my experience, people who claim to be a fan of both teams are usually ridiculed by fans on both sides and told to "pick a team and stick with it." Around here, most people are taught from an early age that you root for one or the other and not both.

As far as choosing a team, I think that friends and family are probably the biggest influences. Geographical location not as important as it once was, although I guess it still plays a part. My mom's family was from the South Side, but I spent my entire life in the Northwest Suburbs, surrounded by Cubs fans, and I never considered rooting for the Cubs. More often than not, you find the fandom passed down through the family and they take it with them no matter where they live.

hi im skot
07-02-2006, 11:11 PM
My dad grew up on the Southside and has always been a huge White Sox fan.

However, he's related stories to me about wishing the Cubs well, and even tuning into Cubs radio broadcasts. He was always, first and foremost, a White Sox fan, though.

We've always joked about a perfect day being a Sox win and a Cubs loss, but up until five or six years ago, he still wished the Cubs well.

Unfortunately (fortunately?), obnoxious Cubs fans finally began to wear on my dad. He got tired of Cubs fans acting like they won the World Series if they took a game or two from the Sox, or even just getting a "how 'bout them Sox?" if the Sox lost the previous night.

Now, he just doesn't care about the Cubs at all, and focuses on the Sox.

Oh, and as for how you pick your allegiances, I think my post tells you- my dad grew up on the Southside.

That, and when I was a few weeks old, we took a weekend trip to Chicago, and took in a Cubs game and Sox game on back to back days. I stayed awake for the Sox game, and they won. I fell asleep at Wrigley, and the Cubs lost.

So, you know, being a Sox fan must be in my genetic make up.

monkeypants
07-03-2006, 12:01 AM
On my dad's side of the family they are all Cubs fans.
On my mom's side of the family they are all Sox fans.
They pretty much grew up in the same neighborhood in Pilsen but neither side ever thought about cheering for the other side.
Thankfully my mom and dad never forced or even asked my brother and I to choose sides and because of this I am a Sox fan and he's a Cub fan.
Neither of us are willing to root for the other side although my brother showed a huge amount of class when the Sox won the World Series and seemed to be genuinely happy that a Chicago team won.

buehrle4cy05
07-03-2006, 12:34 AM
My dad grew up 2 blocks from Wrigely Field. He is an "Old Guard" Cub fan who has been through the ups ('84, if you consider that good) and downs ('69, etc) of the team. He has tried rooting for the Sox since around 2000 when they won the central, but you can tell his heart just isn't in it the way it is with the Cubs.

thomas35forever
07-03-2006, 12:49 AM
I used to be a fan of both teams when I was younger, though I preferred the Sox. I dropped that equal-team loyalty around '03. To answer your question, NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

getonbckthr
07-03-2006, 01:54 AM
In my eyes the Cubs are equal to the Padres, Braves or any other non-division team. However I cannot stand there fans or stadium.

MDF3530
07-03-2006, 02:07 AM
I could never be a Cubs fan. Aside from one of the funniest movies of all time, "Animal House", I've never been into the fratboy mentality.

MDF3530
07-03-2006, 02:16 AM
I really don't have those familial roots of Sox or Cubs fans like a lot of people, where it goes back three or even four generations. Both my parents are from Iowa and my mom moved here when she and my dad got married. I just grew up watching the Sox.

I do have those familial roots with one team though: the University of Iowa Hawkeyes. I get it from my dad. It's his alma mater.

SOXfnNlansing
07-03-2006, 03:35 AM
no

TDog
07-03-2006, 04:21 AM
No, you can't be a real fan of both teams. I don't think it is that hard to understand and the same situation can be said for other sports and regioanl rivals. Jets/Giants in Football, Indiana U/Purdue in College basketball, and Florida/Florida State/Miami in college football. ...

After the Arizona State Lottery was approved by voters and Arizona got into the gambling business, they came out with billboards saying "Arizona plays, Arizona wins." These drew loud protests from members of the Legislature because the billboards were in the University of Arizona colors. Arizona State grads don't complain about the Tempe institution being academically inferior, but they raised hell at what they saw a state-sanctioned Sun Devil bashing.

Likewise, the Sox-Cubs line sort of permeates life for Chicago baseball fans.

QCIASOXFAN
07-03-2006, 04:52 AM
I live in Iowa and I'm going to have to say no.

Deebs14
07-03-2006, 05:33 AM
http://archives.cnn.com/2001/SHOWBIZ/Movies/08/09/chris.tucker/story.chris.tucker.jpg

"AW HELL NAW!!!!!"

RedHeadPaleHoser
07-03-2006, 08:05 AM
I was at yesterday's game, and was sitting with all Cub fans in a skybox. A friend of a co-worker was giving me grief all game(good natured) about how the Cubs were winning, etc...I took it because with the way MB pitched, I couldn't NOT take it. Anyhow, she had had a few, and asked me "If the Sox were having a down year, and the Cubs were in the WS, would you root for them?" I said bluntly, "no". She asked, would you root for the other team? I told her that the Cards are my fave NL team, and if they didn't make it, I probably wouldn't watch the series at all.

She got ALL worked up and started calling me (and all Sox fans) jerkasses(her word, I swear) for not supporting a Chicago team. She then went on a tirade about how SHE supported the White Sox in the WS, even though she hates them. I took out my replica ring, slid it on my pinky, and said, "Thanks for the support. But they would have won this anyway." She kept mumbling about how lousy Sox fans were for the rest of the game.

When I was leaving, she told me again what a jerkass I was, and I calmly said I gave her an honest, non sarcastic answer to her question, and she should be glad that at least someone in this skybox was being honest. She tried to throw her beer in my face. I again held up my ring, thanked her for her support, and left.

WSox597
07-03-2006, 09:07 AM
jerkasses(her word, I swear) for not supporting a Chicago team.

If the White Sox aren't playing, I'm not watching. That includes the team that plays 8 miles north.

By her twisted standards, I guess I'm a "jerkass" whatever that might be. What classy fans they have...

soxruleEP
07-03-2006, 10:02 AM
NO!

As it says in the Bible: "If you are luke-warm, I will vomit you out."

palehozenychicty
07-03-2006, 12:04 PM
Nein!

Nein, ja. You choose.

jenn2080
07-03-2006, 12:21 PM
I was at yesterday's game, and was sitting with all Cub fans in a skybox. A friend of a co-worker was giving me grief all game(good natured) about how the Cubs were winning, etc...I took it because with the way MB pitched, I couldn't NOT take it. Anyhow, she had had a few, and asked me "If the Sox were having a down year, and the Cubs were in the WS, would you root for them?" I said bluntly, "no". She asked, would you root for the other team? I told her that the Cards are my fave NL team, and if they didn't make it, I probably wouldn't watch the series at all.

She got ALL worked up and started calling me (and all Sox fans) jerkasses(her word, I swear) for not supporting a Chicago team. She then went on a tirade about how SHE supported the White Sox in the WS, even though she hates them. I took out my replica ring, slid it on my pinky, and said, "Thanks for the support. But they would have won this anyway." She kept mumbling about how lousy Sox fans were for the rest of the game.

When I was leaving, she told me again what a jerkass I was, and I calmly said I gave her an honest, non sarcastic answer to her question, and she should be glad that at least someone in this skybox was being honest. She tried to throw her beer in my face. I again held up my ring, thanked her for her support, and left.

Jerkasses...NICE! I can not believe she tried to throw her beer in your face!

soxfan26
07-03-2006, 12:33 PM
I asked my Dad that very same question when I was around 8 years old in 1984. He's said I could root for the Cubs, right after I found my own place to live. :cool:

ondafarm
07-03-2006, 12:41 PM
No.

Long answer. There are a few players on the Cubs that I think are class acts and that I like to see do well, except when they play the White Sox. I think I have more players on most other teams than the Cubs that I wish well for. My hatred for the Cubs does not extend to wishing injury on their players (or any players, for that matter.) On this Cubs team I guess Derick Lee is the only player I privately root for. He's a class act from a family of class acts.

RedHeadPaleHoser
07-03-2006, 01:06 PM
Jerkasses...NICE! I can not believe she tried to throw her beer in your face!

It was Bud Light, so the analogy of someone peeing in your face came to mind as well.

34 Inch Stick
07-03-2006, 01:18 PM
As the good book says, you cannot serve two masters.

kevin57
07-03-2006, 01:34 PM
The rarest of all species of "Chicagensis" is one who honestly, truly roots for both team equally.

There are many who claim to have no favorites, but in their heart of hearts, they pull at least a little more for one team over another.

Since the 2005WS, there is also less animus between Sox and Cub fans. Less, but not extinct.

mrs. hendu
07-03-2006, 04:44 PM
I grew up in Europe, live on the North side and I'm a Sox fan. Geographical theories out the door for me. :D:

I guess once you find your team (usually you'll get influenced by family or friends), you stick to it and others don't exist. Then you start noticing things about the other team/fans that you don't like and so your love for your team/"hatred" for the other gets deeply rooted.

I don't personally "hate" any team because players come and go, but fan behavior drives me nuts (stupid curses, whining, looking for scape goats etc.).

All the people who I've met that claim to be "Chicago fans" don't know anything about either team and don't care much anyway.

whitesoxwin
07-03-2006, 08:03 PM
The answer to your question:
NO WAY

Nelson Foxtrot
07-03-2006, 08:47 PM
I grew up as a fan of both teams, have lived my entire life on the south side of Chicago, and never really took any grief for it. I know a lot of people who are the same way. I never really noticed too much about this "feud" until I started checking out online message boards and seeing such incredible hatred, primarily from Cubs fans from places like Nebraska.

I guess I'm more of a general sports fan than most people in the sense that I can't come across any major, minor, college, amateur, pro wrestling, competitive eating, etc. event without finding somebody involved to cheer for. I never bought into the concept of "rivalries" very much, especially with teams in two different leagues. I suppose geography helps a bit, but I never really saw Sox vs. Cubs as being any more special than Orioles vs. Padres.

I agree about nobody loving two teams equally, and I think it's the same even with your favorite baseball team vs. your favorite football team. It reminds me of a Bill Cosby quote along the lines of "You show me a father who doesn't have a favorite child, and I'll show you a man who doesn't know his children."

The two Chicago ballclubs were the two sports teams I was exposed to most early in life, the two teams I've always been most familiar with, and the two teams that I had a lot of fun childhood memories tied to involving family and friends, so I think that's more important than simply being from my town. While I do pay attention to the Bears, Bulls, and Blackhawks, and wish them well, I never had any strong loyalty to them.

Actual Cubs fans always struck me as being similar to Sox fans, or fans of any other team, but they seemed more vastly outnumbered by casual trendy fans with each passing year. Eventually the real fans seemed to disappear, and by the time these new "loyal fans" (who couldn't even tell you Sosa's jersey number) were all convinced they were cheering for God's Chosen Team in late 2003, I came to really hate them. That quickly evolved to hatred for their whiny primadonna players and idiotic manager, and now, ironically enough, the Cubs are my least favorite team.

I also never got the Wrigley love. I wish I would have been able to see a game there in the older days, as I liked the look better before the 1930s changes. It's still a unique field that looks quite nice on television, but the ballpark experience is awful, especially when I was booed for not singing along with Harry. I just never understood his appeal, didn't care much for the "average joe....who just happens to be a lifetime baseball insider" gimmick, and haven't been too impressed listening to his more traditional work with the Cardinals. Oddly enough, I love listening to both Skip and Chip, so I may have a few loose screws.

Nellie_Fox
07-04-2006, 01:32 AM
It's historically a regional thing, which was very much a class thing. Northside was upper class, southside was the stockyards, the factories, very blue-collar. It was a natural rivalry.

I have a little different perspective, having grown up in the near-west suburbs (LaGrange.) It was quite evenly divided between Cubs and Sox fans when I was a kid.

When I was little, baseball was baseball. WGN carried the games of whichever team was homestanding, and I watched. I always had a preference for the Sox (Nellie and Louie were absolute gods to me) but I liked the Cubs. Hey, how could you be 8 or 9 years old and not like Ernie? I cheered for the Cubs back then, but when I was playing, I was always pretending to be the White Sox.

Then, when you got to be around 11-12 years old, you started talking baseball with your buddies at school. It didn't take long before you started arguing about which team was better, requiring you to defend your choice. Mine was the Sox. It didn't take long after that before you started hating the other side, with the irrational passion of an adolescent.

It eventually got to the point where the mere sight of a Cubs cap repulsed me. Still does.

woodenleg
07-04-2006, 09:00 AM
The rarest of all species of "Chicagensis" is one who honestly, truly roots for both team equally.

There are many who claim to have no favorites, but in their heart of hearts, they pull at least a little more for one team over another.

Since the 2005WS, there is also less animus between Sox and Cub fans. Less, but not extinct.

I think those people don't root for both teams equally, they go back and forth, depending on who is 'hot'. I suppose that's okay, because right now, it's in our favor.

You have to be a fan of one or the other, but every family has fans of the "enemy's" team that you have to put up with. My grandma's brother drives everyone else nuts with his Cubs talk. Actually my mom said he screams at people about how he hates the Sox.

Baby Fisk
07-04-2006, 09:28 AM
Pick your side and stick with it.

MadetoOrta
07-04-2006, 09:47 AM
It was actually a couple of cubs fans who convniced me you couldn't even be dispassionate about the other team; you had to hate them. On our way to a varsity baseball game in 1981, two of my high school teammates [cubs fans] kept riding me about how "old man Fisk was a waste of money" and "it's a cubs town, why don't the Sox move" etc ... Well, you know what happened - this was the 1981 opener in Boston where Pudge hit the HR late in the game to take the lead and ultimately win the game. The bus was roaring, taunting those two knuckleheads and - for good or ill - I have passionately rooted against the cubs ever since. You cannot root for both teams.

DumpJerry
07-04-2006, 10:37 AM
Can you be a true believer in two religions at the same time?
I guess the larger question is:
Why the hell would you want to be a Cub fan????
I think the answer to the original is pretty clear based on the overall concensus of the postings.

soxjim
07-04-2006, 11:26 AM
No! Back in 1983 when the SOX won at the time the AL West not many talked about it where I live. In 1984 when the cubs won the nl east thats all that was talked about and I got an earful at school and the neighborhood. Monday at work, a cub fan was talking nonsense about Sundays game. I smiled and looked at my World Series pennant, and picture with the trophy.

Zisk77
07-04-2006, 12:27 PM
Yes, like you can be a capitalist and a communist. Why would anyone want to watch the cubs? Since I don't have kids (children , not baby goats) I don't watch little league baseball.:redneck

Railsplitter
07-04-2006, 05:27 PM
I was for until 1984, when the Cubs were treated as a national phenomenon and the Sox like dirt.

russ99
07-05-2006, 10:15 AM
No, impossible. And anyone that says so is a bandwagoner for one of the two teams.

In each friend that I know who claims to like both the Sox and Cubs, one team is preferred over the other.

One of my friends who swears he's a fan of both teams, totally took Barrett's side after the AJ sucker punch, which leaves me no doubt that he's no Sox fan.

miker
07-05-2006, 11:32 AM
Growing up, my father did all he could to make me a Sox fan while my grandfather was a diehard Cub fan and I would watch a lot of Cub games on TV. So I was a Sox fan but the Cubs and their fans didn't present that much of a problem.

The turning point came in '83-'84. First the Sox lose in the playoffs. Then the Cubs make the playoffs in '84 and all the Cub jerks in school give grief for cheering on the Sox the year before. I vowed at that moment that for me it was White Sox only and forever.

I really enjoyed watching San Diego sending the blue babies home that year, but not as much as I enjoyed watching our 2005 World Champion Chicago White Sox!

Thome25
07-05-2006, 11:37 AM
I am and always will be a Die-Hard White Sox fan. I was born on the north side of Chicago but when I was very young we moved to Bridgeport. After that, we moved to the southwest suburbs.

So yeah, I'd have to say that the whole Sox-Cubs thing has to be geographic. Neither of my parents were real baseball fans and I had to choose for myself. I chose the Sox because I'm a southsider. Also, when I first started loving baseball while in my early to mid-teens I think the makeup of the team had ALOT to do with me becoming a Sox fan. This was in the mid-eighties to the early-ninties when we had Fisk, Ozzie,Baines, Ivan Calderon, Big Frank, Robin Ventura, Rock Raines, Blackjack, Bo Jackson, etc.

I moved to the east coast and I am in an area fairly close to Philadelphia. It is occupied by tons of Phillies fans. Since I moved out here, I have "pretended" to be a Cubs fan to drive the Phillies fans nuts because they are the craziest fans in the world who hate everyone especially other NL teams. Nothing will ever change my love for the White Sox and I will be a die-hard until the day I die. I will also be a die-hard Cubs-hater until the day I die.

Nellie_Fox
07-06-2006, 03:12 AM
Since I moved out here, I have "pretended" to be a Cubs fan to drive the Phillies fans nuts...I couldn't do it. I'd rather pluck my eyes out than even pretend.