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View Full Version : Latest BP Analysis - It's Favorable


infohawk
06-09-2006, 12:05 PM
Here are a few excerpts from the BP article (http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=5183&sessionstatus=notloggedin&mode=login) comparing the Sox to the Tigers. For the record, mods, the excerpts constitute a very small portion of the overall article:

One reason the two teams are so reliant on the long ball against each other is that their defenses are so good.

I think the strong defense, the staffís HR rate and the lineupís power are all positive indicators, but the differences between the teams--the Tigers have virtually no speed and their pitchers donít command the strike zone as well--are significant enough to make me pessimistic about their chances.

Itís a different team--these Sox are fourth in runs, sixth in OBP and fifth in walks drawn, while slipping to sixth in steals, fifth in attempts and fourth in sacrifice bunts. They still play very good defense--second to Detroit in the AL with a .716 DER--and make you hit the ball to get on: 13th in walks allowed with 160.

The 2006 White Sox have more balance and more depth than their 2005 counterparts did. That theyíre toiling in relative obscurity is mostly because of their 9-8 record in one-run games, as opposed to the 19-7 mark last yearís team did at this point in the schedule.

Over 162 games, this Sox team should rise to the top of the Central. The Tigersí OBP issues, their non-strikeout staff and the injury history of their players will all chip away at them over the course of the summer.

A. Cavatica
06-09-2006, 01:04 PM
Here are a few excerpts from the BP article (http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=5183&sessionstatus=notloggedin&mode=login) comparing the Sox to the Tigers. For the record, mods, the excerpts constitute a very small portion of the overall article:

One reason the two teams are so reliant on the long ball against each other is that their defenses are so good.

I think the strong defense, the staffís HR rate and the lineupís power are all positive indicators, but the differences between the teams--the Tigers have virtually no speed and their pitchers donít command the strike zone as well--are significant enough to make me pessimistic about their chances.

Itís a different team--these Sox are fourth in runs, sixth in OBP and fifth in walks drawn, while slipping to sixth in steals, fifth in attempts and fourth in sacrifice bunts. They still play very good defense--second to Detroit in the AL with a .716 DER--and make you hit the ball to get on: 13th in walks allowed with 160.

The 2006 White Sox have more balance and more depth than their 2005 counterparts did. That theyíre toiling in relative obscurity is mostly because of their 9-8 record in one-run games, as opposed to the 19-7 mark last yearís team did at this point in the schedule.

Over 162 games, this Sox team should rise to the top of the Central. The Tigersí OBP issues, their non-strikeout staff and the injury history of their players will all chip away at them over the course of the summer.

Idiots. But they're right.