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thomas35forever
06-04-2006, 08:42 PM
Awhile back, I was at the Museum of Broadcasting Communications and remember watching a CNN broadcast of Old Comiskey getting its first tastes of the wrecking ball. Who remembers and how did you feel when it finally happened?

Lip Man 1
06-04-2006, 08:47 PM
Thomas:

The video came out before the start of the 1991 season. I have the piece in my library. The voice over was by Chicago native and then CNN Sports anchor Nick Charles.

Naturally having grown up in the old park and spent many wonderful days and nights I felt very, very bad. It was like a part of me was dying.

Lip

Chips
06-04-2006, 09:00 PM
I don't remember too much about it, I was only 7 or 8. I do remember going to a couple of games at the old park. We sat behind a support pole.

SoxFan64
06-04-2006, 10:06 PM
I don't remember too much about it, I was only 7 or 8. I do remember going to a couple of games at the old park. We sat behind a support pole.

Most people sat behind a support pole -- that's what made the park so cool. :cool:

CubsfansareDRUNK
06-04-2006, 10:33 PM
I just realized how awesome it is that Lip doesn't believe in quoting people.

DrCrawdad
06-04-2006, 10:39 PM
I don't remember too much about it, I was only 7 or 8. I do remember going to a couple of games at the old park. We sat behind a support pole.

There were usually quite a few Poles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poles) at Old Comiskey.

Wsoxmike59
06-05-2006, 06:09 AM
There were usually quite a few Poles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poles) at Old Comiskey.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/34/AndyTheClown.jpg/200px-AndyTheClown.jpg

Most notably Andy "The Clown" Rozdilsky.
Let's Gooooooo Yooooooooou White Sox!

tebman
06-05-2006, 06:18 AM
It was like a death in the family. Like Lip, I grew up there too and was sad to watch it come down. Understand that it took a few months to demolish it, so we saw it slowly crumble.

But also like the death of an elderly family member, I knew it was coming. The place was old and looked it -- concrete was falling from the upper deck over the right field seats in the '80s just like Wrigley Field is now. I had no illusions about it lasting forever. There was a line that got thrown around a lot during that time, saying that the ballpark was "at the end of its natural life," and it was true.

When New Comiskey opened in '91 it looked to me like a plastic imitation of a ballpark. I was used to the feel and sound of rough concrete and steel beams, which was part of the texture of the old place. I suppose that in 1910 the old place would have been clean and smooth too. Now after 15 years and some remodeling the new ballpark has developed a personality of its own, and that's okay.

Yeah, I was sad to see Comiskey come down, but the alternative was much, much worse.

dickallen15
06-05-2006, 07:47 AM
It was time for it to go, or be gutted and rehabbed. It still didn't take away the sad feeling I had going up the ramps of the new park getting great views of the demolition in progress.

cubhater
06-05-2006, 08:27 AM
I don't recall the Sox making any announcement when demolition would start. I tuned in the noon news one day and the TV cameras were there showing the first few swings of the wrecking ball. I took off to the park and managed to pry a few old bricks off the park, giving a couple to a young kid and an old lady.

The first few months of the 1991 season were hard going to the new place. The old park still looked intact over the viaduct coming from the west on 35th, but you could see it slowly torn down piece by piece once you came out of the viaduct. I cried and had to sit down more than a few times looking at old Comiskey before I regained composure and entered the new park. It was like seeing a loved one slowly die.

RIP Comiskey. I still miss you.:whiner:

miker
06-05-2006, 09:42 AM
Mixed, since the ownership held me and other White Sox fans hostage with the threatened move to Florida, I was very sad to see Comiskey Park demolished, but cautiously optimistic about the future of the new park and the team that was being developed. How young and foolish was I.

Fortunately time and a World Championship has healed most of these old wounds.

SOXPHILE
06-05-2006, 10:19 AM
Sick. Looking back now, I realize that it was time, but it had been a part of my summers for my whole life, even though I was only 20 at the time. All the memories of going there with my dad, and how the last couple of years, I used to wander around that place, discovering all the knooks and crannies, it seemed like I knew it like the back of my hand. 1991 was a VERY strange year, because we were watching the Sox play in a different venue that seemed sterile and lacked any history and personality. Plus, we were "treated" to the sight of Comiskey slowly dying piece by piece all through that summer. It was surreal to stand on 35th street, or INSIDE the new park, and look over, into the old park, with the crumbling walls and rubble everywhere. Night games were worse to me, because I remember the new park was bright, filled with people and noise, the game was going on. Sometimes I would stand on a ramp and look over at Comiskey, all dark, half torn down, and silent. It just didn't seem right.

chi_guy
06-05-2006, 10:28 AM
A little sad. My girlfriend (now wife) went to Comiskey Park to watch the demolition. We took a few photos and tried to get a brick but the guard wouldn't give us one.

Luke
06-05-2006, 10:39 AM
Having never been stabbed I can't say with much certainty what it feels like. If I had to guess though, I would say it felels a lot like watching the wrecking ball hit the old place. I remember a little more of the park being gone each time I went to a game in '91. That was hard to see.

LongLiveFisk
06-05-2006, 10:51 AM
Comiskey Park I did not get its just due. I may be biased but I truly believe it had more charm than Wrigley Field ever had. It just lacked the advertising and propaganda, IMO.

Vernam
06-05-2006, 10:52 AM
It was like a death in the family. Like Lip, I grew up there too and was sad to watch it come down. Understand that it took a few months to demolish it, so we saw it slowly crumble.

But also like the death of an elderly family member, I knew it was coming. The place was old and looked it -- concrete was falling from the upper deck over the right field seats in the '80s just like Wrigley Field is now. I had no illusions about it lasting forever. There was a line that got thrown around a lot during that time, saying that the ballpark was "at the end of its natural life," and it was true.

When New Comiskey opened in '91 it looked to me like a plastic imitation of a ballpark. I was used to the feel and sound of rough concrete and steel beams, which was part of the texture of the old place. I suppose that in 1910 the old place would have been clean and smooth too. Now after 15 years and some remodeling the new ballpark has developed a personality of its own, and that's okay.

Yeah, I was sad to see Comiskey come down, but the alternative was much, much worse.Yeah, I couldn't say it any better. One of my treasured photos shows my dad on the north ramp at New Comiskey, with the ruins of Old Comiskey behind him. His eyes were failing, but we took him to a few games at the old park and one at the new before health kept him away permanently.

Recent changes to the new park really make it feel like home now. The park survived a pretty intense campaign to discredit it, but it's been the best place to actually watch a ballgame in town from the day it was opened.

Vernam

SouthSide_HitMen
06-05-2006, 11:17 AM
I bought a ticket to the first night game (vs. Baltimore) at the new park from someone outside and did not return until 1999. I was pretty peeved about tearing down Comiskey Park and JR's role in 1994 extended my "boycott" or whatever you would call it.

There will never be another Comiskey Park. :(:

Chip Z'nuff
06-05-2006, 11:47 AM
Comiskey Park I did not get its just due. I may be biased but I truly believe it had more charm than Wrigley Field ever had. It just lacked the advertising and propaganda, IMO. the phrase "historic ballpark" did not exist in 1991. The cubs marketing campaign started up after the newness of comiskey II wore off, and they started to create their niche. Wrigley was considered a huge hassle at the time the new park went up, everything about wrigley sucked, the entrances, the exits, the parking. So the "geniuses" at tribco came up with this retro **** and made it cool to have no where to park your car, or wait two hours to exit a park, or go to the bathroom in a cow trough. Wrigley hasn't changed, only its force fed image has.

Keep in mind if comiskey was spared the wrecking ball, tribco would have never started the wrigley field propoganda campaign in the mid nineties because comiskey was so much better in that regard.

Soxski71
06-05-2006, 11:54 AM
I was there when the wrecking ball first hit. On the first swing, the ball bounced off and didn't make a dent. The crowd starting cheering until the second one put a hole in the wall. While walking back to the car, a worker was busting a hole to make a door way and I asked him for a brick, and he gave me one. Still have it!

WestSider
06-05-2006, 12:12 PM
I was there when the wrecking ball first hit. On the first swing, the ball bounced off and didn't make a dent. The crowd starting cheering I remember reading the same thing when the first wrecking ball hit Chicago Stadium - bounced off. I rememeber reading someone shouting "Save by Bannerman!" :smile:

robiwho
06-05-2006, 12:19 PM
It was awful. I thought my dad was going to cry; and the only times I've seen him cry were at his parents' funerals. We didn't get him to go to the new ballpark until 1998.

credefan24
06-05-2006, 03:03 PM
I was only 12 in 1990, but went to about 4 games that season, and maybe 20-25 total at the old park. My first memory of Sox park was waiting in line underneath the main concourse by homeplate to get a photo with the team's starting shortstop. What ever happend to that guy?!

I loved everything about that place, the catwalks, the dark stairways, the green paint.
It was tough going to games in '91, seeing the Baseball Palace of the World gutted and in ruins.
I have a great photo of my dad leaning over the railings on the ramp of the new park, looking into Comiskey. He spent so much time there, it was tough for him.
I did not see him cry until 14 years later, on October 26, 2005.

Fenway
06-05-2006, 03:12 PM
Early July 1991 and as I drove off the Ryan onto 35th St and just saw HALF of the ballpark ( First and RF were gone ) I got ill.

For me Boston Garden was the worst, they took it down brick by brick and being downtown you saw it every day slowly dying. Imploding is better for all concerned

Irishsox1
06-05-2006, 03:42 PM
I was sad to see it go, but if I knew how bland the new stadium would turn out to be, I would have been really upset. This was before Camden Yards so I had no idea what a "retro" park looked like.

As a kid my dad would let me run around the park and I would head to the upper deck and see were the outfield and the first base side joined. The stadium just felt old, and it had a cool cave like feel with the overhang sticking pretty far out and usually leeking during a rain delay. I remember the left field bullpen seats, now that was like sitting in a cave. On the whole, it smelled like stale beer and damp water, especially in the concourses. I don't miss the poles/obstructed views, long aisles, almost no parking and cramped seats.

I like a lot of Sox fans was able to obtain a brick (unpainted) and when the Sox won the World Series, I brought it out and put the game 4 world series ticket on top of it. The two best Sox memorabilia items I have.

paciorek1983
06-05-2006, 05:44 PM
i went to quite a few games in 1990 and roamed the park every game, just to take it all in because I knew the end was near. I took alot of pictures that year too.

I was sad to see it go, but I felt it was better than them playing in Florida. I've never taken the Sox for granted since those dark days in the late 80's.

I was there the day the wrecking ball hit. I skipped classes to be there. I felt compelled to be there that day. I just sat back in my car on the frontage road on the east side of the Ryan. I remember a semi blowing his horn as it went by when the wrecking ball hit the place.

It was a weird summer in 1991, going to games and seeing the park being demolished a little at a time. While watching games in person and on tv, in the back of my mind I kept thinking.."this new place is just temporary....right?"

I was very disappointed that they used blue seats, since the drawings had green seats, and I also didn't like the big hole behind home plate. But when I went in for the first time, there was a song by The Outfield playing, I can't remember the name of it though. While I was walking around I was impressed with how clean the place was. I kept thinking, "this must be what its's like to be at Dodger Stadium"--which at the time, was one of the premier ballparks.

A few weeks later, a friend mentioned that he thought the park looked a little bland. I thought it looked unfinished. I said "well the old park was here for 80 years and it went through some changes, so give this one some time and I think it will look different too."

I am glad that they've made the changes that they did, which I feel that some of us had a hand in getting them to do. I for one, wrote and emailed them since 1997 to get character in the park.

What we have now is a fine ballpark and I can't imagine them still playing the Old Comiskey, especially the way times have changed in regards to watching and going to a game.

Wsoxmike59
06-05-2006, 06:23 PM
I was there when the wrecking ball first hit. On the first swing, the ball bounced off and didn't make a dent. The crowd starting cheering until the second one put a hole in the wall.

The wrecking of Old Comiskey Park was one of the saddest events of my life. It felt like a funeral out there that day. I felt like a part of my childhood and a big chunk of my own life's story was leaving me for good.

The whole entire summer of 1991 as I went to game after game in the new Comiskey park, I had to pass by the old friend the beloved ballpark of my youth, and watch it slowly die. It was painful to watch.

I was there that day the demolition began with my camcorder and got some home video of the event. And when I got home I taped a lot of the local news stories about the demolition, and the most memorable sportscast was done by Ch. 7's Tim Weigel.

As Channel 7 showed the clip of the wrecking ball's first hit on old Comiskey and the wrecking ball bounced away leaving the building unscathed....Tim Weigel opened his newcast by saying "Old Comiskey Park was always tough on hitters!" :D:

I have alot of memories of that sad and mournful day, I remember some guy in the crowd had a boombox playing in the background not far from where I was taping my home movies of the event.

The radio was tuned to Johnny B and you can partially hear some of the Johnny B radio Showgram. He was talking to Jimmy "Bud" Wiser his producer and you can hear Johnny tell Jim Wiser just moments before the wrecking crane starts up that Jimmy should "Hijack" the crane and go knock down the NEW park next door. That got a big laugh from the crowd around us.

I also met Jerry Hairston that day in the parking lot after the crowd had started to thin out. I introduced myself and he even gave me his business card. It was a nice moment on an otherwise sad occasion.

Toward the end of the summer and after the deed was complete, I saw an ad in the Brighton-McKinley Life Paper and a guy was selling a home made tape he made about the demolition of old Comiskey.

The guy went out night after night, week after week and documented the demolition with his home movie camera. I bought the tape and although it's rather crudely made, the footage is priceless and he did an overall good job.

Every time I go to a game at U.S. Cellular I almost always make it a point to stop and see where Old Home Plate stood for 80 years.

<Wsoxmike59 begins humming the Sinatra song...."and there used to be a ballpark....right here" :whiner:

paciorek1983
06-05-2006, 06:30 PM
The wrecking of Old Comiskey Park was one of the saddest events of my life. It felt like a funeral out there that day. I felt like a part of my childhood and a big chunk of my own life's story was leaving me for good.

The whole entire summer of 1991 as I went to game after game in the new Comiskey park, I had to pass by the old friend the beloved ballpark of my youth, and watch it slowly die. It was painful to watch.

I was there that day the demolition began with my camcorder and got some home video of the event. And when I got home I taped a lot of the local news stories about the demolition, and the most memorable sportscast was done by Ch. 7's Tim Weigel.

As Channel 7 showed the clip of the wrecking ball's first hit on old Comiskey and the wrecking ball bounced away leaving the building unscathed....Tim Weigel opened his newcast by saying "Old Comiskey Park was always tough on hitters!" :D:

I have alot of memories of that sad and mournful day, I remember some guy in the crowd had a boombox playing in the background not far from where I was taping my home movies of the event.

The radio was tuned to Johnny B and you can partially hear some of the Johnny B radio Showgram. He was talking to Jimmy "Bud" Wiser his producer and you can hear Johnny tell Jim Wiser just moments before the wrecking crane starts up that Jimmy should "Hijack" the crane and go knock down the NEW park next door. That got a big laugh from the crowd around us.

I also met Jerry Hairston that day in the parking lot after the crowd had started to thin out. I introduced myself and he even gave me his business card. It was a nice moment on an otherwise sad occasion.

Toward the end of the summer and after the deed was complete, I saw an ad in the Brighton-McKinley Life Paper and a guy was selling a home made tape he made about the demolition of old Comiskey.

The guy went out night after night, week after week and documented the demolition with his home movie camera. I bought the tape and although it's rather crudely made, the footage is priceless and he did an overall good job.

Every time I go to a game at U.S. Cellular I almost always make it a point to stop and see where Old Home Plate stood for 80 years.

<Wsoxmike59 begins humming the Sinatra song...."and there used to be a ballpark....right here" :whiner:


Any chance you could send me a copy of those tapes ??

Wsoxmike59
06-06-2006, 05:51 AM
Any chance you could send me a copy of those tapes ??

I'll see what I could do. I have to locate them first. I moved 98% of my VHS up to my summer home since we don't get a lot of TV reception out that way.

Mike

TheKittle
06-06-2006, 04:50 PM
Not to hijack this thread. But didn't Bobby Thigpen throw the last pitch at Old Comiskey? I was playing trivia at a bar and they said it was Scott Radinsky.

paciorek1983
06-06-2006, 04:59 PM
I'll see what I could do. I have to locate them first. I moved 98% of my VHS up to my summer home since we don't get a lot of TV reception out that way.

Mike


Thanks. that would be great !:smile:

paciorek1983
06-06-2006, 05:00 PM
Not to hijack this thread. But didn't Bobby Thigpen throw the last pitch at Old Comiskey? I was playing trivia at a bar and they said it was Scott Radinsky.


Yes It was Thigpen.

markmeista
06-06-2006, 05:12 PM
Comiskey Park I did not get its just due. I may be biased but I truly believe it had more charm than Wrigley Field ever had. It just lacked the advertising and propaganda, IMO.
As a Tigers fan, I firmly believe that the two most underrated parks in all of baseball from 1980-2000 were Comiskey Park and Tiger Stadium. I rank Comiskey in front of my beloved TS because of the fact that Wrigley overshadowed it since they were in the same town. Both Comiskey and "The Corner" (a nickname for Tiger Stadium), I felt, were undeservedly ignored when it came to discussion of the classic ballparks: Fenway, Wrigley, and Yankee Stadium (which is, essentially, a new ballpark, not the one that Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio and Mantle played in).

For heaven's sake, Comiskey was the "Baseball Palace of the World" and helped to usher in the concrete-and-steel era of ballparks, an era that lasted right up until the 1960s nightmare of cookie cutters. Tiger Stadium opened in 1912 and its site at Michigan and Trumbull had a professional baseball history dating back to 1896. But that wasn't mentioned to anybody.

On another note, Comiskey was slowly torn down, and although I didn't witness it, I imagine it being most painful. Now imagine this: seeing the historic stadium you grew up in rot away after seven years of inactivity and having a city so poorly managed like Detroit handling its future. I think Tigers and Sox fans can relate to the pain of losing a treasured baseball facility.

Lip Man 1
06-06-2006, 05:54 PM
Thigpen threw it to Harold Reynolds who hit a meek grounder to Scott Fletcher who threw to Steve Lyons at first and that was that.

Lip

LongLiveFisk
06-06-2006, 07:07 PM
The wrecking of Old Comiskey Park was one of the saddest events of my life. It felt like a funeral out there that day. I felt like a part of my childhood and a big chunk of my own life's story was leaving me for good.

The whole entire summer of 1991 as I went to game after game in the new Comiskey park, I had to pass by the old friend the beloved ballpark of my youth, and watch it slowly die. It was painful to watch.

Don't I know it. To this day, believe it or not, I occasionally have dreams that I'm either sitting in the old park watching a Sox game or that I'm on the way to the park and as I head west down 35th street past that long dark tunnel, the park that emerges is the old one on the left, not the new one on the right. It's quite a weird feeling, even in a dream! :smile:

Bucky F. Dent
06-06-2006, 09:42 PM
I felt nauseous watching the old park slowly torn down.

Since the new park was constructed I have to say that one of the best changes they made was to the name. I know that they didn't change the name for this reason, but there should only ever be one Commiskey Park.

ClaudelSleptHere
06-06-2006, 09:46 PM
I have never had better feelings than when I was sitting in old Comiskey. Tearing it down crushed me. I spent many days there with my dad and my brother, and will never forget those days. I like the Cell, but it's not the same.

skobabe8
06-07-2006, 10:24 AM
Don't I know it. To this day, believe it or not, I occasionally have dreams that I'm either sitting in the old park watching a Sox game or that I'm on the way to the park and as I head west down 35th street past that long dark tunnel, the park that emerges is the old one on the left, not the new one on the right. It's quite a weird feeling, even in a dream! :smile:

I have the same dream. :o: :D:

Thome25
06-07-2006, 10:38 AM
I have the same dream. :o: :D:

sounds like the classic scene in "Field of Dreams" where Kevin Kostner and his wife in the movie both have the same dream.:tongue:

RedHeadPaleHoser
06-07-2006, 01:12 PM
.... Fenway, Wrigley, and Yankee Stadium (which is, essentially, a new ballpark, not the one that Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio and Mantle played in).

Thank you for pointing that out. What ever will be the angle once the new stadium is built in? What will they say then??

XplodingScorbord
06-07-2006, 01:31 PM
As a Tigers fan, I firmly believe that the two most underrated parks in all of baseball from 1980-2000 were Comiskey Park and Tiger Stadium. I rank Comiskey in front of my beloved TS because of the fact that Wrigley overshadowed it since they were in the same town. Both Comiskey and "The Corner" (a nickname for Tiger Stadium), I felt, were undeservedly ignored when it came to discussion of the classic ballparks: Fenway, Wrigley, and Yankee Stadium (which is, essentially, a new ballpark, not the one that Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio and Mantle played in).

For heaven's sake, Comiskey was the "Baseball Palace of the World" and helped to usher in the concrete-and-steel era of ballparks, an era that lasted right up until the 1960s nightmare of cookie cutters. Tiger Stadium opened in 1912 and its site at Michigan and Trumbull had a professional baseball history dating back to 1896. But that wasn't mentioned to anybody.

On another note, Comiskey was slowly torn down, and although I didn't witness it, I imagine it being most painful. Now imagine this: seeing the historic stadium you grew up in rot away after seven years of inactivity and having a city so poorly managed like Detroit handling its future. I think Tigers and Sox fans can relate to the pain of losing a treasured baseball facility.

Good post! And yes, with the rotting, it would have been so much harder. :welcome:

MadetoOrta
06-07-2006, 01:38 PM
I have never had better feelings than when I was sitting in old Comiskey. Tearing it down crushed me. I spent many days there with my dad and my brother, and will never forget those days. I like the Cell, but it's not the same.

I love the moniker. I used something similar. The signs in the '70's were great and creative. I miss walking around the aisle between the golden boxes and grandstand. I'd start down the rightfield line and walk all the way around. Invariably, it took 3 or more innings because I'd stop along the way and meet with friends who'd recognize me and call me to their seats. The Cell is perfectly fine and after last year has a new place in my heart but I do miss Old Comiskey.

Max Power
06-07-2006, 01:58 PM
I only attended 3 or 4 games at the old stadium, but it was definitely a key influence for me becoming a Sox fan and not a Cub fan (as I'd been to Wrigley a few more times during that time period). The history of the place meshed with in your face elements like the scoreboard, fireworks, and "Kiss Him Goodbye." What an atmosphere. I loved it!! And I feel fortunate that I was able to see some games there.
I went to a couple of games the first year of the new park and saw the old place coming down, but it didn't have much of an effect on me other than it was sad to see a great old stadium leave us. I was swayed by the idea of a great new stadium... I was young and impressionable.
I completely agree with others on here that if Comiskey were still around then no one would be talking about how great Wrigley is these days. Comiskey blew that place away.

OH!foracold1
06-07-2006, 03:15 PM
Every time I attended a game at Old Comiskey it was as if I were a kid in a candy store. I couldn't wait to see the light towers driving south on the Dan Ryan and then getting closer and closer to the park. I remember the exploding scoreboard. I remember going to games with my Dad and brothers and friends. I remember my dad always saying, "Maybe this is the time" that he'll get his first ball. I was with him when it finally happened. He raced a little kid down the ramp in the upper deck and chased a ball hit off Dave Nicholson's bat during batting practice. I remember being at the game when "Na Na Hey Hey" started. I remember the sun's ray's gleaming through the arched windows and projecting onto the field. I remember looking around and seeing the upper deck all around you. I remember the smell of the park, the smell of the grass and the smell of the food and saying "God! I love this place". I remember thinking to myself what I wouldn't give to be out on that field. Most of all I remember crying like a baby the day Comiskey died.

:gulp:

tick53
06-11-2006, 11:54 AM
Every time I attended a game at Old Comiskey it was as if I were a kid in a candy store. I couldn't wait to see the light towers driving south on the Dan Ryan and then getting closer and closer to the park. I remember the exploding scoreboard. I remember going to games with my Dad and brothers and friends. I remember my dad always saying, "Maybe this is the time" that he'll get his first ball. I was with him when it finally happened. He raced a little kid down the ramp in the upper deck and chased a ball hit off Dave Nicholson's bat during batting practice. I remember being at the game when "Na Na Hey Hey" started. I remember the sun's ray's gleaming through the arched windows and projecting onto the field. I remember looking around and seeing the upper deck all around you. I remember the smell of the park, the smell of the grass and the smell of the food and saying "God! I love this place". I remember thinking to myself what I wouldn't give to be out on that field. Most of all I remember crying like a baby the day Comiskey died.

:gulp:

Tears rolled down my face when I saw the wrecking ball hit the exterior wall.
And I don't mind admitting it either.:(: