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viagracat
05-17-2006, 11:54 AM
Just a fun article to read if you have a couple minutes. I especially liked Casey Stengel's comments on "Marvelous Marv" Throneberry on the 1962 Mets...:smile:

http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/5587188?GT1=8192

batmanZoSo
05-17-2006, 12:38 PM
Interesting how the best and worst records of all time have 117 in them.

chisoxfanatic
05-17-2006, 02:58 PM
Interesting how the best and worst records of all time have 117 in them.

Actually, that would be 116 for the most wins in a single season ('06 Cubs, '01 Mariners).

JohnBasedowYoda
05-17-2006, 04:00 PM
Actually, that would be 116 for the most wins in a single season ('06 Cubs, '01 Mariners).


shhhh let him believe it. He loves symmetry

chisoxfanatic
05-17-2006, 04:04 PM
shhhh let him believe it. He loves symmetry

LOL! Then, I'm sure Game 2 of the ALCS was his kind of box score!

HomeFish
05-17-2006, 05:11 PM
Where's the Spiders?

batmanZoSo
05-17-2006, 05:15 PM
shhhh let him believe it. He loves symmetry

The world was such a brighter place when it was 117 and 117. :(:

Wait, the 06 Cubs won two playoff games, making it 118. And for one of their regular season wins, they cheated. So it's back to 117! :bandance:

soxinem1
05-17-2006, 06:43 PM
The 1962 Mets were one of the worst teams ever, but they were an expansion club. Teams like the 1970 White Sox, 2003 Tigers, and 2004 D-Backs were very painful to watch, I'm sure. I saw many of their games.

But the 1988 Orioles were one of the most pathetic teams I ever witnessed. Plus, I remember sitting in Comiskey watching Jack McDowell get lit up and the pathetic lineup get shut out by a team that had an ERA around 6.00. This resulted in the Sox stopping the O's 0-21 start.

During that streak, the O's blew 3-4 unbelieveable games that looked like it would end much sooner, but we were destined to be the streak-busters.

I remember the following Monday I caught major hell at work.

I wonder where all those fools are at now........

greenpeach
05-17-2006, 11:00 PM
The 1962 Mets were one of the worst teams ever, but they were an expansion club. Teams like the 1970 White Sox, 2003 Tigers, and 2004 D-Backs were very painful to watch, I'm sure. I saw many of their games.

But the 1988 Orioles were one of the most pathetic teams I ever witnessed. Plus, I remember sitting in Comiskey watching Jack McDowell get lit up and the pathetic lineup get shut out by a team that had an ERA around 6.00. This resulted in the Sox stopping the O's 0-21 start.

During that streak, the O's blew 3-4 unbelieveable games that looked like it would end much sooner, but we were destined to be the streak-busters.

I remember the following Monday I caught major hell at work.

I wonder where all those fools are at now........

Those fools are probably sitting in the bleachers at the shrine tonight waiting for someone to tell them that the Cubs game is over.

viagracat
05-18-2006, 11:12 AM
Where's the Spiders?

Yes, the 1899 Cleveland Spiders of the NL went 20-134 and finished 84 games out of first. This list was taken from baseball's "modern" era, which started in 1900. It also appears the 1899 Spiders were the victims of owner sabotage, as explained briefly below, so perhaps this record is dubious:

The Spiders had won the Temple Cup, the equivilent of the World Series then, just four years earlier in 1895, but the owner dismantled the team in 1898 in an apparent hissy fit (including sending Cy Young to the Browns), leaving a bunch of has-beens and never weres on the 1899 squad.

More: http://www.wcnet.org/~dlfleitz/cleve.htm

LongLiveFisk
05-18-2006, 11:54 AM
I've heard bad things about the 1970 White Sox.

PKalltheway
05-18-2006, 01:33 PM
Another team that was pretty bad was last year's Royals. 106 losses including 19 in a row at one point.:o:

PKalltheway
05-18-2006, 01:38 PM
2004 D-Backs were very painful to watch, I'm sure. I saw many of their games.
Their manager for part of the season, Al Pedrique, has to go down as one of the worst managers in baseball history, even though he didn't even manage a full season. It seemed like he didn't even try to motivate his team in the least, even when the ship was already sunk.

TDog
05-18-2006, 02:04 PM
I've heard bad things about the 1970 White Sox.

Nothing you have heard could do the team justice.

viagracat
05-18-2006, 02:14 PM
I've heard bad things about the 1970 White Sox.

To make it worse, Chicago, I think, became a Cub town after the 1969 debacle that established the lovable loser nonsense, and the Cubs started off 1970 pretty well on top of it ("wait until next year!"), all of which established the aura of all things Cub in this town that persists to this day (although I think--finally-- that's changing a little). That shift was aided by the Sox's 56-106 record :o: in 1970; and Allyn was making noise about moving the team out of Chicago and some home games, IIRC, were played in Milwaukee that year because nobody was going to Comiskey. Here's to:gulp: anyone who stuck with the Sox during that horrendous time.

Fenway
05-18-2006, 02:24 PM
The expansion Washington Senators were truly awful in 1961, but the 62 Mets has the NYC PR machine behind them.

soxinem1
05-19-2006, 11:47 AM
The expansion Washington Senators were truly awful in 1961, but the 62 Mets has the NYC PR machine behind them.

And it worked very well too, as millions flocked to watch them throughout the 60's.

TDog
05-19-2006, 01:43 PM
To make it worse, Chicago, I think, became a Cub town after the 1969 debacle that established the lovable loser nonsense, and the Cubs started off 1970 pretty well on top of it ("wait until next year!"), all of which established the aura of all things Cub in this town that persists to this day (although I think--finally-- that's changing a little). That shift was aided by the Sox's 56-106 record :o: in 1970; and Allyn was making noise about moving the team out of Chicago and some home games, IIRC, were played in Milwaukee that year because nobody was going to Comiskey. Here's to:gulp: anyone who stuck with the Sox during that horrendous time.

The Sox's Milwaukee games were played in '68 and '69. The Sox actually had an excellent record in the '69 Milwaukee games, "excellent" perhaps being a relevant term. It was certainly better than they had in Chicago. I'm not sure if it was was kept them ahead of the Seattle Pilots. A memorable Tribune story after one Milwaukee home game began, "Maybe the White Sox should move to Milwaukee." Not only were the Sox winning. Attendance in Milwaukee was far better than Chicago. By 1969, the Sox were already dead. As I recall, every Chicago crowd to see the Sox that season was under under 16,000. The Pilots moved to Milwaukee in 1970. Like the Sox, they lost their opener 12-0. But at the end of the week, the Brewers swept the first Sunday doubleheader of the season (by scores of 5-2 and 16-2) to establish who the real losers were.

The Cubs started their surge in 1967, climbing to first place in May or June, and began drawing fans, the year the Sox collapsed in the last week of the pennant race. The Sox were bad in 1968, dismal in 1969 and almost comically bad in 1970.

Still, I loved Carlos May, Bill Melton, Ed Herrmann, Wilbur Wood and Syd O'Brien. The new organist, Nancy Faust, did her best to make the games fun. There would soon be better days for the guys.

Well, not Syd O'Brien.