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View Full Version : Don Cooper featured in the New York Times


Mercy!
05-14-2006, 02:21 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/14/sports/baseball/14chass.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

"WHILE the Yankees struggle with their aging, injured and flawed corps of starting pitchers, the Chicago White Sox flourish with theirs. And who can they thank for helping build their corps? The Yankees."

and

"So why has Contreras pitched so effectively for the White Sox? Why has Vázquez pitched so effectively for the White Sox when he had a 4.91 E.R.A. for the Yankees? Don Cooper, the unheralded White Sox pitching coach, is a large part of the answer."

"Unheralded" in New York, maybe.:cool:

SoxEd
05-14-2006, 03:53 PM
I still maintain that we need someone to convince Steinbrenner that Coop actually hates the NYY franchise, and will NEVER sign for them, even if Big George backs a semi full of $ up to his house.

I fear that this season will be his last in the good guys' pinstripes...

oeo
05-14-2006, 03:58 PM
I still maintain that we need someone to convince Steinbrenner that Coop actually hates the NYY franchise, and will NEVER sign for them, even if Big George backs a semi full of $ up to his house.

I fear that this season will be his last in the good guys' pinstripes...

Coop has been with the Sox organization for years, I don't think he will be going anywhere soon.

SoxEd
05-14-2006, 04:02 PM
Coop has been with the Sox organization for years, I don't think he will be going anywhere soon.

I thought his contract expired at the end of this season?
Or is it next season?

Or am I hallucinating again?

MadetoOrta
05-14-2006, 04:11 PM
As good a job as Coop has done with the staff, one wonders why a team hasn't hired him to manage their club? Defensive coordinators become head coaches in the NFL every year. If Coop leaves, it'll be to manage a club not become the NYY's pitching coach.

ondafarm
05-14-2006, 04:30 PM
As good a job as Coop has done with the staff, one wonders why a team hasn't hired him to manage their club? Defensive coordinators become head coaches in the NFL every year. If Coop leaves, it'll be to manage a club not become the NYY's pitching coach.

I doubt Coop wants to be a manager. While he understands pitching, hitting probably isn't his forte. Managers have a lot of responsibilties and things they don't control. If the pitching staff is failing, then either the pitching coach or manager is fired, but it's mostly the pitching coach's fault. Also goes with hitting and defense. Anything failing and the manager may go.

chaerulez
05-14-2006, 04:45 PM
I doubt Coop wants to be a manager. While he understands pitching, hitting probably isn't his forte. Managers have a lot of responsibilties and things they don't control. If the pitching staff is failing, then either the pitching coach or manager is fired, but it's mostly the pitching coach's fault. Also goes with hitting and defense. Anything failing and the manager may go.

Pitching coaches still sometimes become managers. Joe Kerrigan and Larry Rothschild come into mind (maybe they aren't successful, heh), but I'm sure when a pitching coach becomes a manager the hitting coach just handles the offense duties.

Daver
05-14-2006, 05:36 PM
I doubt Coop wants to be a manager. While he understands pitching, hitting probably isn't his forte. Managers have a lot of responsibilties and things they don't control. If the pitching staff is failing, then either the pitching coach or manager is fired, but it's mostly the pitching coach's fault. Also goes with hitting and defense. Anything failing and the manager may go.

Kenny Williams had to convince Cooper to remain the big league pitching coach at the end of the season when he replaced Nardi, Don wanted to go back to being the minor league pitching coordinator.

He has been with the Sox for about 15 years, I doubt he is going anywhere soon.

caulfield12
05-14-2006, 06:02 PM
Was Larry Dierker a pitching coach too prior to managing, or did he come directly from the broadcasting booth?

Maybe Steve Stone will be the next Cubs´ manager, lol.

ondafarm
05-14-2006, 06:17 PM
Pitching coaches still sometimes become managers. Joe Kerrigan and Larry Rothschild come into mind (maybe they aren't successful, heh), but I'm sure when a pitching coach becomes a manager the hitting coach just handles the offense duties.

I'm not saying it can't happen, but there just aren't a lot who become great managers.

oldcomiskey
05-14-2006, 08:33 PM
I'm not saying it can't happen, but there just aren't a lot who become great managers.
the name Ray Miller comes to mind

mmmmmbeeer
05-15-2006, 12:09 AM
I want to say there was article last year with Coop mentioning how much he envied his father's dedication to a single job/organization for his entire career. Coop made it sound like he would like to follow in his father's footsteps. Coop doesn't seem like the kind of dude who really cares too much about a few extra bucks, as long as he likes what he's doing.