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SouthSide_HitMen
05-07-2006, 11:12 PM
Earl Santee has been involved in the design of 18 MLB stadiums and over 40 minor league and spring training facilities.

The link also provides renderings of the new Mets stadium (always a hit on WSI :thumbsup: ) as well as the Nationals, Busch and two projects in limbo - the Twins and Marlins (The New Yankee Stadium will be linked shortly).

http://www.businessofbaseball.com/santee_interview.htm

One change in design over the past few years vs. Comiskey / Jacobs Field / Camden Yards:

In fact, Id say if anything the baseball suite market has shrunk significantly over the last five years. I mean significantly. It is about providing distinct experiences for the premium seats just like you do with the everyday fan, and that makes the buildings different than what they were before. When we do suites now, there are not many of them and we do them in such a way that they have a position that causes the design to stay uniquely different. Like in Jacobs [Field], where you have three levels of suites along the third base line, but I dont think you see the suite market driving the design of the projects anymore. In fact, its one of those ingredients but were definitely in a shrinking suite market and it has been for five years.

Ol' No. 2
05-08-2006, 09:53 AM
Earl Santee has been involved in the design of 18 MLB stadiums and over 40 minor league and spring training facilities.

The link also provides renderings of the new Mets stadium (always a hit on WSI :thumbsup: ) as well as the Nationals, Busch and two projects in limbo - the Twins and Marlins (The New Yankee Stadium will be linked shortly).

http://www.businessofbaseball.com/santee_interview.htm

One change in design over the past few years vs. Comiskey / Jacobs Field / Camden Yards:

In fact, Id say if anything the baseball suite market has shrunk significantly over the last five years. I mean significantly. It is about providing distinct experiences for the premium seats just like you do with the everyday fan, and that makes the buildings different than what they were before. When we do suites now, there are not many of them and we do them in such a way that they have a position that causes the design to stay uniquely different. Like in Jacobs [Field], where you have three levels of suites along the third base line, but I dont think you see the suite market driving the design of the projects anymore. In fact, its one of those ingredients but were definitely in a shrinking suite market and it has been for five years.I never had any desire to watch a game from a suite. Being in the stands is where it's at.

Hangar18
05-08-2006, 10:00 AM
In fact, its one of those ingredients but were definitely in a shrinking suite market and it has been for five years.


We can say this much for sure about Comiskey II, it has definitely become a "HOW NOT-TO" design a baseball stadium. Again, you look at all the new parks that are being built, and the main component that goes with the park is the surrounding area. I was just at Petco last year and the difference between last June and last week when I was there was amazing, all of the construction around the park that just keeps happening, more restaurants and bars going up in the area, making that side of town an entertainment option. The SOX need to bite the bullet and admit their SoxUtopia design of Nothing around the park, just doesnt work in an urban environment.

ondafarm
05-08-2006, 10:14 AM
I never had any desire to watch a game from a suite. Being in the stands is where it's at.

I've been in a suite twice and will once again this year. A company I was working for had several out of town business guest, including several foreign nationals. I was asked to come along, and given an upgrade on my tie, to aid in explaining to international business guys the finer points of baseball. There's nothing like telling a Kuwaitii what a slider is.

I also went with a group of exchange students and was a guest speaker, informing them of the difference between Japanese and American baseball. I almost got fired on that gig because I gave the entire talk in Japanese, although the group could iunderstand and all their teachers, the bimbo who was running the whole thing insisted she was conducting an immersion class.

My mother turns 70 this June so the whole family will turn out for her birthday celebration at a Sox game. We are taking a suite and are trying to contact other past presidents of the Nellie Fox fan club. Billy Pierce is also being contacted. But it'll be a nice group of just under 39 so a suite works perfectly.

itsnotrequired
05-08-2006, 10:27 AM
I never had any desire to watch a game from a suite. Being in the stands is where it's at.

I wouldn't want to catch all the games from a suite but one or two a season would be nice.

So who is going to invite me?

Luke
05-08-2006, 02:29 PM
We can say this much for sure about Comiskey II, it has definitely become a "HOW NOT-TO" design a baseball stadium. Again, you look at all the new parks that are being built, and the main component that goes with the park is the surrounding area. I was just at Petco last year and the difference between last June and last week when I was there was amazing, all of the construction around the park that just keeps happening, more restaurants and bars going up in the area, making that side of town an entertainment option. The SOX need to bite the bullet and admit their SoxUtopia design of Nothing around the park, just doesnt work in an urban environment.
I think that was case a few years ago, but the area around the park is changing really quickly now. With all the new lofts and condos going up, and lots of artist moving to Bridgeport, the neighborhood may look a lot like Bucktown or Wicker Park in 5 or 10 years. Coming from the northen 'burbs I always thought Bridgeport had a very cool, very real character, I hope it doesn't get lost.