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soxwon
04-27-2006, 06:48 PM
THROUGHOUT SOX HISTORYNAME THE PARTNERS THAT HAVE WORKED WITH THE FOLLOWING LEAD ANNOUNCERS
bob elson 7 partners
harry caray 7 partners
joe mcconell 2 partners
lorn brown 1 partner
john rooney 2 partners

name the partners

johnr1note
04-27-2006, 07:14 PM
It depends on how you count the partnering, because some of the lead play by play guys served as color commentators for other play by play announcers, but here is what I have:

Bob Elson 7 partners: Jack Brickhouse, Dick Bingham, Don Wells, Ralph Kiner, Milo Hamilton, Bob Finnegan, Red Rush

Harry Caray 7 partners (actually 8): Ralph Faucher, Gene Osborn, Bill Mercer, Lorn Brown, Jimmy Piersall, Mary Shane, Joe McConnell, Rich King

Joe McConnell 2 partners (actually 3): Early Wynn, Lorn Brown, Del Crandall

Lorn Brown 1 partner: Del Crandall

John Rooney 2 partners: Wayne Hagen, Ed Farmer

**************

Now, of which of these do you have fond memories? Who was the best Sox radio team?

Of course, for me, I was coming of age when Harry was doing the call, and I thought he did a great job on radio.

I remember Early Wynn as having a poor on air delivery, but a very knowledgable color guy. Lorn Brown was OK.

soxwon
04-27-2006, 10:12 PM
It depends on how you count the partnering, because some of the lead play by play guys served as color commentators for other play by play announcers, but here is what I have:

Bob Elson 7 partners: Jack Brickhouse, Dick Bingham, Don Wells, Ralph Kiner, Milo Hamilton, Bob Finnegan, Red Rush

Harry Caray 7 partners (actually 8): Ralph Faucher, Gene Osborn, Bill Mercer, Lorn Brown, Jimmy Piersall, Mary Shane, Joe McConnell, Rich King

Joe McConnell 2 partners (actually 3): Early Wynn, Lorn Brown, Del Crandall

Lorn Brown 1 partner: Del Crandall

John Rooney 2 partners: Wayne Hagen, Ed Farmer

**************

Now, of which of these do you have fond memories? Who was the best Sox radio team?

Of course, for me, I was coming of age when Harry was doing the call, and I thought he did a great job on radio.

I remember Early Wynn as having a poor on air delivery, but a very knowledgable color guy. Lorn Brown was OK.


i think you looked these up in the media guide.
if you didnt your amazing.

i was just trying to test the KNOWLEDGE of sox fans.

TornLabrum
04-27-2006, 10:52 PM
It depends on how you count the partnering, because some of the lead play by play guys served as color commentators for other play by play announcers, but here is what I have:

Bob Elson 7 partners: Jack Brickhouse, Dick Bingham, Don Wells, Ralph Kiner, Milo Hamilton, Bob Finnegan, Red Rush

Harry Caray 7 partners (actually 8): Ralph Faucher, Gene Osborn, Bill Mercer, Lorn Brown, Jimmy Piersall, Mary Shane, Joe McConnell, Rich King

Joe McConnell 2 partners (actually 3): Early Wynn, Lorn Brown, Del Crandall

Lorn Brown 1 partner: Del Crandall

John Rooney 2 partners: Wayne Hagen, Ed Farmer

**************

Now, of which of these do you have fond memories? Who was the best Sox radio team?

Of course, for me, I was coming of age when Harry was doing the call, and I thought he did a great job on radio.

I remember Early Wynn as having a poor on air delivery, but a very knowledgable color guy. Lorn Brown was OK.

Of course, this didn't ask about the TV partners for Caray and Rooney.

Of the radio partners, I remember or knew of:

Elson: Brickhouse, Wells, Kiner, Hamilton, Finnegan, and Rush.
Caray (radio): All
McConnell: All.
Brown: Yup.
Rooney (radio): Both

StillMissOzzie
04-28-2006, 02:22 AM
Didn't Gary Thorne do some radio for the Sox too? I don't remember if that was a temporary thing, filling in for someone else while they did something like NCAA basketball , or what, but I do remember his dulcet tones. I also recall cringing whenever I heard Del Crandall speak.

SMO
:gulp:

johnr1note
04-28-2006, 09:10 AM
i think you looked these up in the media guide.
if you didnt your amazing.

i was just trying to test the KNOWLEDGE of sox fans.

OK, OK, I admit looking at the media guide to refresh my memory -- i certianly wasn't around for the Elson/Brickhouse broadcasts of the 50s. I would have been right going back to Harry, but as others point out, the TV and radio booth sometimes blend together. Rooney did a little TV w/Drysdale as I recall, so I somehow remember Drysdale doing radio, but the media guide says no.

tebman
04-28-2006, 10:31 AM
It depends on how you count the partnering, because some of the lead play by play guys served as color commentators for other play by play announcers, but here is what I have:

Bob Elson 7 partners: Jack Brickhouse, Dick Bingham, Don Wells, Ralph Kiner, Milo Hamilton, Bob Finnegan, Red Rush

Harry Caray 7 partners (actually 8): Ralph Faucher, Gene Osborn, Bill Mercer, Lorn Brown, Jimmy Piersall, Mary Shane, Joe McConnell, Rich King

Joe McConnell 2 partners (actually 3): Early Wynn, Lorn Brown, Del Crandall

Lorn Brown 1 partner: Del Crandall

John Rooney 2 partners: Wayne Hagen, Ed Farmer

**************

Now, of which of these do you have fond memories? Who was the best Sox radio team?
The most entertaining by far were Caray and Piersall. For all his experience, I never thought much of Bob Elson; he always sounded like he just woke up, though when he was paired with Hamilton and Rush I thought they were good on-air teams. Early Wynn was bru-tal, and Mary Shane was in over her head.

Joe McConnell, Lorn Brown, Jack Brickhouse, Milo Hamilton, and of course, John Rooney, were all broadcast pros who painted a great word picture and were easy on the ears. Sadly, that's not the case now with Ed Farmer. I don't know if Farmer is simply incapable of sounding more interesting, or if it's an act that he's worked on, but he has that too-cool-for-school quality that's more annoying than unique.

But hey, If I'm so smart, why didn't they ask me? :tongue:

Dick Allen
04-28-2006, 01:08 PM
Bob Elson was considered the dean of broadcasters at the time, if I recall correctly. But he was awfully dull, even when the team wasn't.

johnr1note
04-28-2006, 02:16 PM
Bob Elson was considered the dean of broadcasters at the time, if I recall correctly. But he was awfully dull, even when the team wasn't.

He was SO dull that White Sox historian Richard Linberg dubbed him "the Somnambulist." To Bob Elson, home runs were "White Owl Wallops." and we were constantly being pointned towards "Friendly Bob Adams. . . " I wonder if there are any recordings available today of Elson. I mean, I was a kid at at the time, and I remember a sense that he called a good game, but its so fuzzy. I heard a recording of Jack Brickhouse calling a Cubs game from the late 60s at the Museum of Broadcast History a while back, and was shocked at how different he was than I remembered him. I guess time makes all our boyhood heroes seem larger than life.

I will say this much about Harry when he was in his prime (either with the Cards or the Sox), before old age caught up with him when he was with the Cubs, and he became a sad caricatrue of himself. Harry knew how to call a game on the radio. My biggest complaint about the recent Sox broadcast teams prior to this year was if you tuned in during an inning in progress, you invariably had to wait until the last out was recorded and they were headed for commercial before anyone mentioned the score. Or sometimes the situation -- runners on, count, etc. If you jumped in, it took quite a while to catch up. Not so with Harry. There was always a quick reminder of the score, the count, runner on base . . . whatever information could be relevant to someone tuning in within the last few minutes. But these were asides. He always focused on the game, and the action in front of him. Even when he would venture into innaneness (reading off the fans who were present and had sent him a note "the boys from Whiting are here . . . " or commentary about spelling names backwards and such) it always was brief. You never felt disconnected from the action. Even the now missed John Rooney seemed hell bent on keeping me in suspense, waiting until the last possible moment to reveal the score. I HATED that.