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View Full Version : Random observations from Monday's game.


santo=dorf
04-18-2006, 10:52 PM
The Hall of Fame gift shop has been changed. They got rid of the museum part, and have more shopping space with the fans being able to try on the jerseys without asking for assistance.

The yellow pinwheels going the wrong way on the middle section of the ballpark are really faded out.

Gray paint is peeling off all over the same areas mentioned above.

The skyboxes above my section (152) were completely gutted.

Beer is $6.00 a pint.

Why are the Sox listed as the 1900 American League Champions considering our team and the American League were established in 1901? :?:

The blue seats suck and will not be missed at all.

JohnBasedowYoda
04-18-2006, 11:14 PM
Why are the Sox listed as the 1900 American League Champions considering our team and the American League were established in 1901? :?:



I think there was like a "pre-season season"

Lip Man 1
04-19-2006, 11:47 AM
The American League actually began in 1900 but was not 'officially' recognized until 1901 after representatives of both leagues reached an agreement.

Lip

roylestillman
04-19-2006, 11:54 AM
Those skyboxes above 152 were never built out, as well as a pretty large number of them along the 1st base side. They were used as auxiliary press boxes during the post season last year. Those white wooden counters are still there from last fall.

PaleHoseGeorge
04-19-2006, 12:36 PM
The American League actually began in 1900 but was not 'officially' recognized until 1901 after representatives of both leagues reached an agreement.

Lip
The Western League renamed itself the American League for the 1900 season. This is also the year the St. Paul Saints moved to 39th Street and renamed themselves the White Stockings. They won the very first American League championship.

For 1901 the American League declared itself a major league and began to raid in earnest the talent from N.L. rosters. Today this is officially recognized as the beginning of the modern era of baseball, two major leagues competing separately.

There was no agreement between the A.L. and N.L. until 1903 when the N.L. finally agreed to a world championship, but the governance of the two leagues remained mostly separate for many years afterwards.

Now we just need TornLabrum to set the record straight and tell me exactly what happened.
:wink:

Fabs
04-19-2006, 01:41 PM
The Hall of Fame gift shop has been changed. They got rid of the museum part, and have more shopping space with the fans being able to try on the jerseys without asking for assistance.



Where did they move all the cool museum stuff? I was wondering where it went. :(:

TornLabrum
04-19-2006, 05:22 PM
The Western League renamed itself the American League for the 1900 season. This is also the year the St. Paul Saints moved to 39th Street and renamed themselves the White Stockings. They won the very first American League championship.

For 1901 the American League declared itself a major league and began to raid in earnest the talent from N.L. rosters. Today this is officially recognized as the beginning of the modern era of baseball, two major leagues competing separately.

There was no agreement between the A.L. and N.L. until 1903 when the N.L. finally agreed to a world championship, but the governance of the two leagues remained mostly separate for many years afterwards.

Now we just need TornLabrum to set the record straight and tell me exactly what happened.
:wink:

You got it right on the money. The 1900 AL was still considered to be a minor league, and they actually still operated under the old National Agreement with the NL, even securing NL permission to move to Chicago, provided they didn't play north of (IIRC) 35th St. The old South Side Grounds was on 39th (now Pershing Rd.) between Princeton and Wentwork.

The AL declared war on the NL in 1901, and started raiding it for talent. (There was some pretty good second rate talent available in 1900 because the NL cut back from 12 to 8 teams before the start of the 1900 season.) Open war existed until 1903. John McGraw was the AL's Benedict Arnold, secretly agreeing to quit on the Baltimore Orioles in 1902, taking his best players with him to New York to play for the Giants. The AL retaliated by selling the Baltimore Franchise (which was operated by the league for the rest of 1902) to a couple of NY pols.

With AL teams in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and St. Louis outdrawing their older NL rivals, the NL sent out peace overtures. Baseball was governed by a National Commission, consisting of the presidents of both leagues and one other person. They handled all interleague matters and goverened the World Series.

Another oddity. McGraw hated Ban Johnson. One of the reasons he absconded to New York was the latest in a series of suspensions Johnson handed McGraw for dirty tactics. He boycotted the 1904 World Series. The first Series in 1903 was actually just a mutually agreed to series of games by Boston and Pittsburgh. After the 1904 fiasco, John Brush, who owned the Giants laid down the rules for the 1905 Series. The "Brush Rules" are pretty close to those that govern the Series today.

Now aren't you sorry you asked?

itsnotrequired
04-19-2006, 05:50 PM
You got it right on the money. The 1900 AL was still considered to be a minor league, and they actually still operated under the old National Agreement with the NL, even securing NL permission to move to Chicago, provided they didn't play north of (IIRC) 35th St. The old South Side Grounds was on 39th (now Pershing Rd.) between Princeton and Wentwork.

The AL declared war on the NL in 1901, and started raiding it for talent. (There was some pretty good second rate talent available in 1900 because the NL cut back from 12 to 8 teams before the start of the 1900 season.) Open war existed until 1903. John McGraw was the AL's Benedict Arnold, secretly agreeing to quit on the Baltimore Orioles in 1902, taking his best players with him to New York to play for the Giants. The AL retaliated by selling the Baltimore Franchise (which was operated by the league for the rest of 1902) to a couple of NY pols.

With AL teams in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and St. Louis outdrawing their older NL rivals, the NL sent out peace overtures. Baseball was governed by a National Commission, consisting of the presidents of both leagues and one other person. They handled all interleague matters and goverened the World Series.

Another oddity. McGraw hated Ban Johnson. One of the reasons he absconded to New York was the latest in a series of suspensions Johnson handed McGraw for dirty tactics. He boycotted the 1904 World Series. The first Series in 1903 was actually just a mutually agreed to series of games by Boston and Pittsburgh. After the 1904 fiasco, John Brush, who owned the Giants laid down the rules for the 1905 Series. The "Brush Rules" are pretty close to those that govern the Series today.

Now aren't you sorry you asked?
:hawk

"I luuuv baseball history"

PaleHoseGeorge
04-19-2006, 05:55 PM
:hawk

"I luuuv baseball history"

This topic was right in Torn's wheelhouse. I knew he would take me deep if I wasn't careful, nibbbling on the edges.

:jon
"Hey, that's just the way I pitch."

:wink:

itsnotrequired
04-19-2006, 05:58 PM
This topic was right in Torn's wheelhouse. I knew he would take me deep if I wasn't careful, nibbbling on the edges.

:jon
"Hey, that's just the way I pitch."

:wink:

I read Koppett's Concise History of Major League Baseball (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0786712864/qid=1145487392/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_3/102-9940023-7580116?s=books&v=glance&n=283155) last year and am re-reading it again this year. I just finished reading about the creation of the AL.:cool:

gosox3072
04-19-2006, 06:38 PM
Any answer for what they did with the hall of fame part of the gift store?

skobabe8
04-19-2006, 07:32 PM
Any answer for what they did with the hall of fame part of the gift store?

Yep. Its all been moved to the scout seat restaurant.

nasox
04-19-2006, 08:12 PM
anybody else see the dumbass on the visitors dugout in the top of the 5th inning? Security kicked him out promptly, but what an idiot.