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View Full Version : I need a good baseball read


mike squires
04-10-2006, 02:23 AM
Ok, about a month ago I read and really enjoyed "The Bad Guys one. " A behind the scenes look at the RedSox/Mets in 86. I know there have been some talk about baseball books in the past. Any good reads out there you now I'll like that I can pick up at the library?

Mr. White Sox
04-10-2006, 02:34 AM
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy

not sure of the author.

TheKittle
04-10-2006, 03:46 AM
Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy

not sure of the author.

Jane Leavy. Great book.

Shut Out by Howard Bryant Talks about the racial history of the Red Sox.

Steelrod
04-10-2006, 05:07 AM
Not the Times or the Trib!

goofymsfan
04-10-2006, 08:17 AM
Ok, about a month ago I read and really enjoyed "The Bad Guys one. " A behind the scenes look at the RedSox/Mets in 86. I know there have been some talk about baseball books in the past. Any good reads out there you now I'll like that I can pick up at the library?

Maybe I'll Pitch Forever-Satchel Paige

Ball Four-Jim Bouton

Jurr
04-10-2006, 08:24 AM
Ball four is a great read. Lots of insider stuff.

Moneyball is a good one, if you've never read it.

My favorite is called Game Time: A baseball companion by Roger Angell. This guy has been covering baseball for sixty years, and he gives really good insight. The book jumps with different stories that he's written over his tenure. He writes about days he spent with Bob Gibson (learning about Bob Gibson's competitive nature was awesome), Joe Dimaggio, and others. Then, after reading about past players, he breaks into a writing about how intrigued he was by the Giants/Braves pennant chase of 1992 or Bonds' homer chase to 73. It's incredible.

viagracat
04-10-2006, 10:04 AM
"Carcher In The Wry" by Bob Uecker. He's as funny a writer as he is in person.

roylestillman
04-10-2006, 10:06 AM
Slouching Towards Fargo. Its the story of the St. Paul Saints in about 1996 and 1997 when Mike Veeck and Bill Murray were running the team.

dondosae1
04-10-2006, 10:07 AM
I will probably be made fun for even mentioning this, but I am currently reading, "Chicken Soup for a Baseball Fan's Soul". I don't like to read at all, but I have really been enjoying this book. Great stories and it could be a really fast read (I only read a story or two a day).

PaulDrake
04-10-2006, 10:33 AM
I highly recommend New York City Baseball: The Last Golden Age by Harvey Frommer. Between 1947 and 1957 at least one NY team played in the WS every year except for 1948. In 1954 the Giants stunned the baseball world by sweeping a Cleveland Indians team that had won 111 games in the regular season, which was only 154 games back then. The following year Brooklyn's Dodgers finally won a WS, a victory all the more sweet because they beat the Yankees. It truly was a golden age for NYers, and it all came to a sudden inglorious end. In 1957 first the Giants, then the Dodgers announced they were California bound. This book tells the story of that time better than anything else I've ever read.

Luke
04-10-2006, 11:07 AM
Three nights in August is a pretty good read, if you can stand to read a book about a Cubs-Cards series. It actually speaks pretty warmly of the people in the Sox organization from LaRussa's tenure. It's very much for the baseball nerd, sometimes goes into pitch-by-pitch detail of the approach to a game.

Luckiest Man is a pretty good read as well. Lots of info about Lou Gehrig, but also a lot of Yankee love and adoration.

Koufax book (A Lefty's Legacy) was great. One of the best baseball books I've ever read.

Money Ball was OK. Kenny doesn't look quite so silly now. It's almost required reading for a baseball fan, even if you don't agree with SABRmetrics and PECOTA.

I'm currently reading Scout's Honor. It's about the Braves scouting methods. Very much the anti-MoneyBall. The information is awesome, the writing style is a little stiff though.

SouthSide_HitMen
04-10-2006, 11:26 AM
Earl Weaver on Strategy
Veeck as in Wreck
The Boys of Summer

spiffie
04-10-2006, 11:40 AM
"Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty" by Buster Olney is a great description of how a team with all the resources in the world can buy itself right out of a championship.

"Juicing the Game" by Howard Bryant not only gives a lot of positive pub to the White Sox and Frank Thomas, but really sets the table for the "Game of Shadows" controversy going on now.

"Whatever Happened to the Hall of Fame" by Bill James is just a nifty read. Plus it advocates Minnie Minoso for the Hall of Fame.

chisox117
04-10-2006, 12:20 PM
I'd reccomend

"If They Don't Win, It's a Shame" by Dave Rosebaum -- an interesting day by day, behind the scenes look at the 1997 Marlins team that "bought" the World Series.
-or-
if you're looking for a White Sox book, Stealing First in a Two Team Town by Rich Lindberg is probably my favorite.

:gulp:

michned
04-10-2006, 12:25 PM
As was mentioned in a previous post, the funniest baseball book I ever read was "Catcher In The Wry," by the Ueck.

Other favorites: "The Bronx Zoo," by Sparky Lyle and Peter Golenbock, which gave an inside look at the asylum that was the '78 Yankees.

"Me and the Spitter," by Gaylord Perry. Great autobiography. It's been about 30 years since I read it, but I believe he credits former Sox pitcher Bob Shaw with teaching him the pitch.

"The Umpire Strikes Back," by Ron Luciano. Interesting because it's a baseball biography from the umpire's point of view. It's still hard to believe a guy who was so upbeat and funny had another side and wound up taking his own life and left a note basically saying, this is no one's fault, it's just time to go.

Luke
04-10-2006, 12:36 PM
I'd reccomend

"If They Don't Win, It's a Shame" by Dave Rosebaum -- an interesting day by day, behind the scenes look at the 1997 Marlins team that "bought" the World Series.
-or-
if you're looking for a White Sox book, Stealing First in a Two Team Town by Rich Lindberg is probably my favorite.

:gulp:

Stealing First gives some interesting perspective into the new park and how it came to be. I was suprised to learn of the correspondance between the Sox and MLB.

pdimas
04-10-2006, 12:44 PM
The Thrill of the Grass by W.P. Kinsella - It's a book of short stories. I read it at least once a summer and am now on my third copy of the book.

Larceny and Old Leather - I forget the author but he is from the Chicagoland area. Its a really amusing and funny read about how crooked the game can be :smile: .

chisox117
04-10-2006, 03:44 PM
Stealing First gives some interesting perspective into the new park and how it came to be. I was suprised to learn of the correspondance between the Sox and MLB.

Yeah, those were trying times to be a Sox fan. Ueberroth basically tells Reinsdorf: If you don’t get the new tax-payer funded stadium, leave town…Don’t worry about the White Sox fans, they’ve got the Cubs to root for.:angry:

To all who got the deal done::gulp:

goofymsfan
04-10-2006, 06:46 PM
I will probably be made fun for even mentioning this, but I am currently reading, "Chicken Soup for a Baseball Fan's Soul". I don't like to read at all, but I have really been enjoying this book. Great stories and it could be a really fast read (I only read a story or two a day).

I love this one. They need to come out with at second edition.

goofymsfan
04-10-2006, 06:57 PM
You're Out and You're Ugly, Too! Confessions of an Umpire with Attitude-Durwood Merrill

I enjoyed this one, but I know some have found it to be a bit thick with sarcasm and such.

Anything by David Halberstam. I really enjoyed October, 1964. Teammates was mentioned by someone else.

Parrothead
04-10-2006, 07:01 PM
Earl Weaver on Strategy
Veeck as in Wreck
The Boys of Summer

Veeck as in Wreck is outstanding. My 16 year old nephew thought so too.

D. TODD
04-11-2006, 10:46 AM
"The Black Prince of Baseball" The Hal Chase story. Just finished it, and it was an interesting read. Alot about the gambling, and early days of the game. Chase was a character to say the least.

areilly
04-11-2006, 11:44 AM
Veeck as in Wreck is outstanding. My 16 year old nephew thought so too.

I'm going to go ahead and give ""Veeck as In Wreck" a resounding nomination. Can we make it required reading among the Sox fan base? :cool:

I also know how much he's loved around here, but David Wells' "Perfect I'm Not" is actually a pretty entertaining book, if not a little overly self-congratulatory. And he does speak pretty kindly about the Sox organization as a whole.