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View Full Version : Just a little scenario to think about (Baseball GM's worst nightmare)...


WhiteSoxFan84
04-07-2006, 06:45 PM
My friends and I always bring up odd scenarios about anything and everything and most of them are usually nonsense and just funny. But this is a scenario that my friends and I love to go back and forth on. I will just say it to you guys like I've heard it and use myself as an example...


I've always been known as a laid back guy that never cared for much and was always looking to have fun. I like playing the game of baseball and am very good at it, but the passion for the game and it's history, I've never really had it. I've been partying hard my whole life and just letting loose. I somehow graduate college and get drafted by a major league team. I keep my act together for a couple of seasons in the minors and a couple of years in the majors. The scouts are raving about me being the next big thing and everytime wants to acquire me.

The team that drafted me is scared to lose me so they offer me a HUGE contract extension. I'm currently making the league minimum (just over $300,000) when they decide to offer me a 5 year, $30 million. I play it cool and pretend not to like the deal too much and then tell the team, "Hey, I love this city, I love this team, I love this organization, let's make the deal a 10-year deal". I'm a hitter, young, durable, and extremely talented, so they don't see why not, and offer me a 10 year, $90 million extension (every penny is guranteed). I sign immediately even though a lot of people around baseball see this as a steal for the team considering I'll be worth a lot more in a couple of years and especially if I had tested free agency.

However, none of them realize how little I care about the game. I see the contract, see the GURANTEED money, and let loose again and I drop the "act". I start partying everyday, showing up late to practice, and slowly I start falling apart as a baseball player. In less than 2 years after signing the 10-year deal, I am not even good enough to stay on the major league roster of my team. I give it a go in the minors for a month or two and decide to just retire. I don't feel that bad at all though, as I didn't care much for the game and just wanted the money, which I got.


My questions to you guys are;
1) has a player ever done anything like this?
2) do you think a player with this mentality exists/will exist?
3) what can GMs in baseball (and basketball for that matter) do about guranteed contracts that get them screwed? i know insurance is an option, but look at the astros and jeff bagwell, it doesn't always work out for the team.
4) would you ever do something like this? and it doesnt have to be something this drastic, something as little as a divorce may cause guys to just not care anymore, retire, and have them at home collecting the money.

bigfoot
04-08-2006, 06:22 PM
IIRC, the max term an insurance co will guarantee a contract is for three years. It was longer at one time, but the burn marks from some LT contracts came back to bite them. Mostly pitchers whose arms fell apart. The scenerio you describe is intriguing, sounds like Scammy.......

Thome's Homey
04-08-2006, 06:37 PM
If you retire, you break your contract and are not payed the remainder of it, even when it's guaranteed. The only way to get around that is to demand the entire amount of the contract as a signing bonus and then play for the league minimum. No team is dumb enough to do that.

Daver
04-08-2006, 06:41 PM
This couldn't happen, because there are out clauses in every contract for a player that does not comply with what the team he is contractually bound to's policies. Showing up late everyday would result in having him put on the ineligible list, which means he doesn't get paid, and he cannot seek employment elsewhere. Soriano almost faced that with the Nationals this year by refusing to play left field.

WhiteSoxFan84
04-08-2006, 07:15 PM
This couldn't happen, because there are out clauses in every contract for a player that does not comply with what the team he is contractually bound to's policies. Showing up late everyday would result in having him put on the ineligible list, which means he doesn't get paid, and he cannot seek employment elsewhere. Soriano almost faced that with the Nationals this year by refusing to play left field.

What if the player just started losing his skill?

And as for the person who said if you retire you don't get any money, didn't Albert Belle retire and get paid? I know his problem was injuries forced him to retire, but I'm pretty sure anyone who wants to retire can blame it on some injury or what have you.

Thome's Homey
04-08-2006, 07:21 PM
What if the player just started losing his skill?

And as for the person who said if you retire you don't get any money, didn't Albert Belle retire and get paid? I know his problem was injuries forced him to retire, but I'm pretty sure anyone who wants to retire can blame it on some injury or what have you.

An injury is different. Your team will release you if they think you're beyond salvaging. If that happens, you get paid.

The thing is, they're going to send you to 3 or 4 doctors on THEIR payroll before they believe that you're damaged beyond repair.

If a player just starts to suck at all things baseballish or if he's just dogging it, he'll rot in A ball until he gets off his butt. They'll keep him until the end of his contract because they'd have to pay him, anyway.

Chances are, the guy gets so embarrassed at being in A ball that he plays his butt off to get to the bigs. Otherwise, people will talk about him the way they talk about Joe Borchard. No one wants to be talked about like that. Imagine everyone you know reading in the paper daily that you're a worthless hack. Yuck. :redneck

voodoochile
04-08-2006, 07:23 PM
What if the player just started losing his skill?

And as for the person who said if you retire you don't get any money, didn't Albert Belle retire and get paid? I know his problem was injuries forced him to retire, but I'm pretty sure anyone who wants to retire can blame it on some injury or what have you.

Nope, injury or age causing loss of skills/production do not void the contract.

It wasn't a guaranteed contract, but both Cade McNown and Ryan Leaf from football are examples of guys who took the money and ran for the party life.

If money is all you care about then you aren't a professional athlete, you are just some clown with enough skills to get paid.

Ol' No. 2
04-09-2006, 12:08 PM
There are so many implausible parts of this story that the combination of all of them together becomes an impossibility. Just getting through the minor leagues to a major league roster takes an enormous amount of dedication and sacrifice. Right there, this hypothetical player would have been filtered out. Second, free agency only kicks in after 6 years of service, so there's no reason for a team to offer a long-term contract to this guy. By the time he's accumulated six years, his true colors will be apparent. Third, teams don't offer big contracts purely on potential. Fourth, you can't just retire and blame it on non-existant injuries. Witness what's going on in Houston. Bagwell had numerous medical examinations before the insurance would pay off.

ewokpelts
04-09-2006, 01:11 PM
There are so many implausible parts of this story that the combination of all of them together becomes an impossibility. Just getting through the minor leagues to a major league roster takes an enormous amount of dedication and sacrifice. Right there, this hypothetical player would have been filtered out. Second, free agency only kicks in after 6 years of service, so there's no reason for a team to offer a long-term contract to this guy. By the time he's accumulated six years, his true colors will be apparent. Third, teams don't offer big contracts purely on potential. Fourth, you can't just retire and blame it on non-existant injuries. Witness what's going on in Houston. Bagwell had numerous medical examinations before the insurance would pay off.
Difference though, is that Bagwell wants to play.

As for this imaginary player, it's near impossible to make an mlb roster, so why would you want to piss it away?

Gene

p.s. the only recent player that signed a long term deal so early in his mlb career is Pujols. But he already had three monster years before he signed that contract, and the redbird KNEW he'd win almost every arbitrtation case. Better to lock him down below his true market value.