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View Full Version : 1906, a different era indeed!


stl_sox_fan
03-27-2006, 12:20 PM
I was just reading chicagosports.com over lunch. They will have a season long article reminiscing about the Subway Series.


http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/media/thumbnails/htmlstory/2006-03/22543940.jpg (http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubssox/cs-060327cubssox06,1,5934104.htmlstory?coll=cs-home-headlines)

Look at these stats
1906 Sox Stats (http://baseball-reference.com/teams/CHW/1906.shtml)
Amazing stat - Billy Sullivan and Fielder Jones led the team with 2 Home Runs!!

1906 Cubs Stats (http://baseball-reference.com/teams/CHC/1906.shtml)
Amazing stat - Mordeci Brown led the Cubs with 26 wins and a 1.04 ERA

And oh yeah...Sox Won it all!!!!

Baby Fisk
03-27-2006, 12:24 PM
Was there a subway back in 1906? :?:

lumpyspun
03-27-2006, 12:25 PM
Yea, that's what I was going to ask too...The Subway Series was in 2000.

stl_sox_fan
03-27-2006, 12:25 PM
Was there a subway back in 1906? :?:

I'll edit the thread to read "Horse and Buggy Series" :D:

russ99
03-27-2006, 12:26 PM
I was just reading chicagosports.com over lunch. They will have a season long article reminiscing about the Subway Series.


http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/media/thumbnails/htmlstory/2006-03/22543940.jpg (http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubssox/cs-060327cubssox06,1,5934104.htmlstory?coll=cs-home-headlines)

Look at these stats
1906 Sox Stats (http://baseball-reference.com/teams/CHW/1906.shtml)
Amazing stat - Billy Sullivan and Fielder Jones led the team with 2 Home Runs!!

1906 Cubs Stats (http://baseball-reference.com/teams/CHC/1906.shtml)
Amazing stat - Mordeci Brown led the Cubs with 26 wins and a 1.04 ERA

And oh yeah...Sox Won it all!!!!


My desktop picture is the front page from 1906 of an unnamed Chicago newspaper - what a great headline!

For some strange reason, they refer to the Cubs as the "Giant Killers". I wonder why?

Baby Fisk
03-27-2006, 12:28 PM
My desktop picture is the front page from 1906 of an unnamed Chicago newspaper - what a great headline!

For some strange reason, they refer to the Cubs as the "Giant Killers". I wonder why?
The NY Giants won the NL pennant the previous year.

However in 1906 there was no bigger Goliath than the invincible Cubs. The Sox humiliated them in the WS.

stl_sox_fan
03-27-2006, 12:31 PM
Was there a subway back in 1906? :?:
This got me thinking.
From www.chicago-l.org (http://www.chicago-l.org/history/index.html)

Knowing is half the battle. Yo Joe!!!:cool:

Baby Fisk
03-27-2006, 12:41 PM
This got me thinking.
From www.chicago-l.org (http://www.chicago-l.org/history/index.html)

Knowing is half the battle. Yo Joe!!!:cool:
Great link. :thumbsup:

batmanZoSo
03-27-2006, 01:03 PM
"The 1906 World's Series is brought to you by Subway sandwich shoppes."

http://www.coalvalleydays.com/images/subway_logo.jpg

Even though in 1906 the sub sandwich didn't exist and neither did radio to broadcast such a message.

Did you know the sandwich was invented by Earl of Sandwich in 1762? Figures a guy named Sandwich invents the sandwich. What a coincidence, eh?

lumpyspun
03-27-2006, 01:14 PM
"The 1906 World's Series is brought to you by Subway sandwich shoppes."

http://www.coalvalleydays.com/images/subway_logo.jpg

Even though in 1906 the sub sandwich didn't exist and neither did radio to broadcast such a message.

Did you know the sandwich was invented by Earl of Sandwich in 1762? Figures a guy named Sandwich invents the sandwich. What a coincidence, eh?

Did you know that where I'm from in Northeastern PA, the word sandwich has morphed into "Sangwich".

itsnotrequired
03-27-2006, 01:16 PM
"The 1906 World's Series is brought to you by Subway sandwich shoppes."

http://www.coalvalleydays.com/images/subway_logo.jpg

Even though in 1906 the sub sandwich didn't exist and neither did radio to broadcast such a message.

Did you know the sandwich was invented by Earl of Sandwich in 1762? Figures a guy named Sandwich invents the sandwich. What a coincidence, eh?

:ozzie

"Subway: Eat French!"

:cool:

jortafan
03-27-2006, 01:53 PM
Was there a subway back in 1906? :?:

There was no subway in Chicago back then, but the elevated train tracks were already in place, particularly the portion that gives the downtown area its nickname "the Loop."

My point in noting that fact is to say that it doesn't matter. Only an all-New York series is a "subway" series. For Chicago, it would be the "el" series (or "L" series or "elevated" series, whichever spelling you prefer). And the "el" was in place back in 1906.

This is just a little nit-picking on my part, since it irritates me a little bit when people try to apply New York slang to a Chicago thing. It doesn't bother me as much as the concept of Chicago Cubs fans do. It is more along the lines of people beyond the age of 6 who slop ketchup on their hot dogs, then wonder why sensible people give them a funny look.

Madvora
03-27-2006, 02:25 PM
There was no subway in Chicago back then, but the elevated train tracks were already in place, particularly the portion that gives the downtown area its nickname "the Loop."

My point in noting that fact is to say that it doesn't matter. Only an all-New York series is a "subway" series. For Chicago, it would be the "el" series (or "L" series or "elevated" series, whichever spelling you prefer). And the "el" was in place back in 1906.

This is just a little nit-picking on my part, since it irritates me a little bit when people try to apply New York slang to a Chicago thing. It doesn't bother me as much as the concept of Chicago Cubs fans do. It is more along the lines of people beyond the age of 6 who slop ketchup on their hot dogs, then wonder why sensible people give them a funny look.
To me, it's "The Cubs-Sox game"

"Red Line Series" would be the title that makes the most sense.

itsnotrequired
03-27-2006, 02:31 PM
There was no subway in Chicago back then, but the elevated train tracks were already in place, particularly the portion that gives the downtown area its nickname "the Loop."

My point in noting that fact is to say that it doesn't matter. Only an all-New York series is a "subway" series. For Chicago, it would be the "el" series (or "L" series or "elevated" series, whichever spelling you prefer). And the "el" was in place back in 1906.

This is just a little nit-picking on my part, since it irritates me a little bit when people try to apply New York slang to a Chicago thing. It doesn't bother me as much as the concept of Chicago Cubs fans do. It is more along the lines of people beyond the age of 6 who slop ketchup on their hot dogs, then wonder why sensible people give them a funny look.

The correct spelling is "L". The "El" is in NYC.

stl_sox_fan
03-27-2006, 02:43 PM
This thread took a completely different turn than I had expected.
Can I trademark CTA Series? SF-Oakland coined the BART series back in '89.
BTW CTA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Transit_Authority)founded in 1947.

TDog
03-27-2006, 02:44 PM
There was no subway in Chicago back then, but the elevated train tracks were already in place, particularly the portion that gives the downtown area its nickname "the Loop." ...

Although there were subways in other cities. In London, subways are pedestrian footpaths that run under roads, but the Underground was operating underground trains for mass transit as early as the 1860s.

batmanZoSo
03-27-2006, 03:18 PM
The correct spelling is "L". The "El" is in NYC.

Wouldn't "el" make more sense because it's elevated? Or is it called "L" because of "the loop"?